Creating Sustained Systematic School Change
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Creating Sustained Systematic School Change

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This powerpoint is based on Failure is Not an Option by Alan Blankstein, Chapter 3. This explains how to turnaround low performing schools that will be based on the next chapters in this book: Six ...

This powerpoint is based on Failure is Not an Option by Alan Blankstein, Chapter 3. This explains how to turnaround low performing schools that will be based on the next chapters in this book: Six principles that advance student improvement and success.

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Creating Sustained Systematic School Change Creating Sustained Systematic School Change Presentation Transcript

  • Creating Sustainable Systematic School Change Wafa Hozien, Ph.D. Virginia State University whozien@vsu.edu Based on the Book: Why Failure Is Not An Option
  • 10 Common Routes to Failure and How to Avoid Each CHAPTER 3
  • 10 Common Routes to Failure, and How to Avoid Each
  • Overview: Obstacles to Change and Possible Solutions Obstacle Possible Solutions Obstacle 1: We Don’t Want to Change • • • • Phase in sustainable change Begin with the “willing few” Create fail-safe environments for pioneers to operate Provide forums for successes to be heard, celebrated and emulated • Reevaluate the leadership style toward ensuring long-term commitment from staff to success of all students Create teacher-led leadership teams Endorse the changes teachers determine are beneficial for students Obstacle 2: You’re the Leader, Tell Me What to Do Obstacle 3: We Have No Time For This! • • • • • • • • Determine if time is the only issue Ensure that the change process is seen as worth the time spent Provide common planning time Involve students in community-based service learning Create banks of time Explore the options discussed in Resource 2, Strategies for Making Time
  • Obstacle Possible Solutions • Obstacle 4: Carrots and Sticks Don’t Work • Obstacle 5: Students Must Be Tested and Graded Obstacle 6: The Mandates are in the Way • Provide constructive alternatives to extrinsic rewards such as grades Emphasize that the goal is to learn and to grow continually • Revise grading system • Use project-based learning alternatives • Work with the school district toward acceptance of data on teacher performance based on the school’s principles of learning • Use buffering strategies to protect staff
  • Obstacle Possible Solutions Obstacle 7: We Like Last Year’s Silver Bullet Better • • • Clarify intentions, beliefs, values, and mission to ensure alignment of new initiatives Build internal capacity and direction versus external search for quick solutions Show how new initiatives offer a well-planned and assessed means of reaching the school’s smart goals Obstacle 8: We Don’t Know What We Want, What We Need, or the Difference Between the Two • Ask school teams to take the quick self- assessment provided in Resource 3. Obstacle 9: We Can’t Agree • • Gain consensus on the definition of consensus Confront behaviors that are inconsistent with the mutual agreement Broadly tout and celebrate successes • Obstacle 10: We’re Waiting for the Dream Team • • Recognize that taking leadership at any level- in the classroom or building – can still contribute to student success Pursue the ideal response to a void in leadership: Fill it
  • Obstacle Possible Solutions • • Obstacle 9: We Can’t Agree Obstacle 10: We’re Waiting for the Dream Team • • • Gain consensus on the definition of consensus Confront behaviors that are inconsistent with the mutual agreement Broadly tout and celebrate successes Recognize that taking leadership at any level- in the classroom or building – can still contribute to student success Pursue the ideal response to a void in leadership: Fill it
  • • Blankstein, Alan M. (2004). Failure Is Not an Option: Six Principles That Advance Student Achievement in Highly Effective Schools. Thousand Oaks, Calif. : Corwin. References