Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Personas for Accessible UX
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Personas for Accessible UX

6,210

Published on

Published in: Design, Technology
0 Comments
32 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
6,210
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
15
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
72
Comments
0
Likes
32
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Social model of disability.
    It's the interaction.
    That's what we create.
    So it make sense that accessibility is part of UX
  • ISO says so.
  • Discussion
  • Invisible: people think they don't know any pwd
    They don't get included in user research

    Hidden: relatively low numbers of any specific disability
    and assistive technology is not revealed in analytics. (pros and cons of this)

    Misunderstood: still. Really.
  • Accessibility and usability both have the same approach to what makes a problem, error or barrier critical
    See
    David Travis: www.userfocus.co.uk/articles/prioritise.html
    Glenda Sims: 2103 Accessibility Summit: http://environmentsforhumans.com
  • Avoids focus on disabiity and shifts it to the interaction of technologu\y
  • Transcript

    • 1. Personas for Accessible UX Including everyone in design & research Whitney Quesenbery Center for Civic Design http://www.slideshare.net/whitneyq/personas-for-accessible-ux Twitter: @whitneyq | #aux
    • 2. Hi Whitney Users' stories, plain language, accessibility, civic design A Web for Everyone a book with Sarah Horton
    • 3. Usability and accessibility are like twins separated at birth 
    • 4. Disability the outcome of the interaction between a person ... and the environment and attitudinal barriers they may face International Classification of Functioning (ICF), World Health Organization
    • 5. Accessibility The usability of a product, service, environment or facility by people with the widest range of capabilities. - ISO 9241-20
    • 6. How do we include people with disabilities in our design considerations?
    • 7. Why are people with disabilities not considered (more) in UX design work? Invisible Hidden Misunderstood
    • 8. It's about barriers, or... What problems will stop someone from being able to use the site? Barrier Priority What it covers Critical Barriers that stop someone from using a site or feature successfully Serious Problems that cause frustration, slow someone down, or require work-arounds Annoying (moderate) Things that are frustrating, but won't stop someone from using the site Noisy (minor) Minor issues that might not cause someone a problem, but which damage credibility
    • 9. It's not (just) about checklists....or What is the experience we are trying to support and improve?
    • 10. Personas Present research data in human form Provide context for characteristics Show variation and diversity
    • 11. But how do we incorporate accessibility needs into our personas?
    • 12. Focus on domain User journey Aptitude Attitude Ability
    • 13. Focus on domain
    • 14. Focus on ability? Vision Hearing Mobility Dexterity Cognitive
    • 15. Focus on ability Carol Jacob Lea Emily Steven Maria Trevor Vishnu
    • 16. Focus on assistive technologies? Eye trackers Screen magnifiers Keyboard Captions Speech and...
    • 17. Responsive to different devices
    • 18. Responsive to different interaction styles Images: Braille, foot pedal, magnifier, Talking Dial, Voiceover, joystick, audio, high contrast keyboard Glenda Watson Hyatt and her iPad, captions on screens, plain language labels, speech input
    • 19. Focus on features and preferences Flexible presentation Media alternatives Diversity of devices Variations in input methods Multilanguage Distracted use
    • 20. Emily "I want to do everything for myself" • College student, works part time at a community center • Loves her iPad • Can be clumsy with technology so likes large, clear buttons and to control timing
    • 21. Emily "I want to do everything for myself" • College student, works part time at a community center • Loves her iPad • Can be clumsy with technology so likes large, clear buttons and to control timing
    • 22. Jacob "The right technology lets me do anything." • Paralegal, writes case summaries overnight • Complete gadget geek • Likes audio • Uses a keyboard.
    • 23. Jacob "The right technology lets me do anything." • Paralegal, writes case summaries overnight • Complete gadget geek • Likes audio • Uses a keyboard.
    • 24. Because everyone has preferences!
    • 25. Accessible UX Personas Carol Jacob Lea Emily Steven Maria Trevor Vishnu
    • 26. I like consistent, familiar places on the web Ability: Autism Spectrum Disorder. Uses larger text and a program that hides everything but the text, so he doesn’t get distracted Aptitude: Uses the computer well for games, but doesn’t learn new sites easily Attitude: Prefers familiar sites in an established routine Assistive Technology: Text preference settings, power keyboard user. Trevor • 18 years old • Lives with family • Goes to secondary school • Computers at school; laptop at home; basic mobile phone with SMS
    • 27. Emily I want to do everything for myself Ability: Cerebral palsy. Difficult to use hands and has some difficulty speaking clearly; uses a motorized wheel chair Aptitude: Uses the computer well, with the right input device; good at finding efficient search terms Attitude: Wants to do everything for herself; can be impatient Assistive Technology: Communicator (AAC) with speech generator, iPad, power wheelchair • 24 years old • Graduated from high school and working on a college degree • Lives in a small independent living facility • Works part-time at a local community center
    • 28. Jacob The right technology lets me do anything. Ability: Blind since birth with some light perception Aptitude: Skilled technology user Attitude: Digital native, early adopter, persists until he gets it Assistive Technology: Screen reader, audio note-taker, Braille display • 32 years old • College graduate, legal training courses • Shares an apartment with a friend • Paralegal, reviews cases and writes case summaries • Laptop, braille display, iPhone
    • 29. Lea No one gets that this really is a disability. Ability: Fatigue from fibromyalgia, trackball, and special keyboard Aptitude: Average user Attitude: Wishes people would understand how hard it can be for her to make it through the day Assistive Technology: Split keyboard, power keyboard user, Dragon Naturally Speaking • 35 years old • Masters degree • Writes for a trade publication; works from home
    • 30. Steven My only disability is that everyone doesn't sign. Ability: Native language is ASL; can speak and read lips; uses SMS/IM, Skype, and video chat Aptitude: Good with graphic tools, and prefers visuals to text; poor spelling makes searching more difficult Attitude: Can be annoyed about accessibility, like lack of captions Assistive Technology: Sign language, CART, captions, video chat • 38 years old • Art school • Graphic artist in a small ad agency • iPad, iPhone, MacBook Pro; good computer at work
    • 31. Vishnu I want to be on the same level as everyone else. Ability: Speaks three languages: Gujarati, Hindi, English, and a little spoken Mandarin. Uses contrast adjustment to see the screen clearly Aptitude: Expert user of technical tools; frustrated searching across languages Attitude: Sees himself as a world citizen, and wants to be able to use any site Assistive Technology: Contrast adjustments, screen magnification, personalized stylesheets • 48 years old • Engineering degree • Works for a medical software company on international projects • Born in India, finished graduate school in Malaysia, lives in Singapore • High tech all the way at work; two mobile phones and a personal laptop
    • 32. Maria I love this. It's all here...when I can find it. Ability: Prefers Spanish language sites, when she can find them; needs information and instructions written clearly Aptitude: Adventurous, but not very proficient; husband and daughter set up bookmarks for her Attitude: Thinks it’s wonderful to be able to have her favorite websites with her at all times Assistive Technology: Skype, online translation sites • 49 years old • Community college + healthcare certificate • Married, grown children • Spanish – English bilingual • Community health worker • Smartphone from her phone service, home computer primarily her husband’s, for his work
    • 33. Carol My grandkids are dragging me into the world of technology. Ability: First signs of macular degeneration, mild arthritis; hearing aid; no special AT on computer Aptitude: Used computers when she worked as a bookkeeper, but now her grandkids keep her old home computer updated Attitude: Willing, but not adventurous Assistive Technology: Enlarges text, but makes few other adjustments • 74 years old • Husband passed away a year ago • Lives in an apartment near one of her daughters, near some of her six grandkids (ages 6 to 16) • Retired; worked 25 years as a bookkeeper for a construction company • Older computer at home; basic mobile phone
    • 34. Just do it! Photo: mtstcil.org
    • 35. Whitney Quesenbery whitneyq@civicdesign.org @whitneyq Center for Civic Design civicdesign.org @civicdesign A Web for Everyone Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery Rosenfeld Media @AWebforEveryone
    • 36. Thank you

    ×