• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Enterprise Social Media: Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007
 

Enterprise Social Media: Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007

on

  • 1,178 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,178
Views on SlideShare
1,178
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
8
Comments
1

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Enterprise Social Media: Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Enterprise Social Media: Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Document Transcript

    • Enterprise Social Media: Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 www.awarenessnetworks.com
    • Trends and Best Practices in Adopting Web 2.0 in 2007 Definitions For the purposes of this report, the following terms are defined as follows: • Communities—a group of people who primarily interact via a computer network; also a supplemental form of communication among people who know each other primarily in real life. • Social network—a social structure made of individuals or organizations that are tied by one or more specific types of interdependency, such as values, visions, idea, financial exchange, friends, etc. • Wiki—software that allows users to create, edit and link web pages easily; often used to create collaborative websites and to power community websites. • Podcast—a collection of digital media files distributed over the Internet using syndication feeds for playback on portable media players and personal computers. • Forum—a web application for holding discussions and posting user generated content. • RSS—a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated content such as blog entries, news headlines or podcasts, enabling users to keep up with their favorite websites in an automated manner that’s easier than checking them manually (formally “RDF site summary,” known colloquially as “really simple syndication”). • Discussion group—see Forum; may refer to the entire community or to a specific subforum dealing with a distinct topic. • Photo sharing—the publishing or transfer of a user’s digital photos online, thus enabling the user to share them with others. — information courtesy of wikipedia.com www.awarenessnetworks.com 3
    • Trends and Best Practices in Adopting Web 2.0 in 2007 Abstract This report seeks to explore the adoption of Web 2.0 technologies in 2007 and the future of social media initiatives in enterprise-size organizations. Discussed herein are the current uses of Web 2.0 technologies such as blogs, wikis and social networking, concerns about the risks posed by such technologies and the success rates and effectiveness of these tools. Key findings uncovered in the study include: • More than half of enterprise-size organizations utilize Web 2.0 technologies (54 percent), as do 74 percent of companies with less than 500 employees. • The majority of respondents using Web 2.0 technologies employ a combination of internal- and external-facing tools (64 percent). • Blogs are the most used Web 2.0 technology (selected by 87 percent of respondents), followed by communities, wikis, RSS feeds and social networking. • The most successful uses of Web 2.0 technologies in their organizations are blogs (44 percent), communities (42 percent) and wikis (39 percent). • Ninety-six percent report that all Web 2.0 technologies they’ve used have been successful, with 83 percent reporting no clear failures. • Limited internal resources to deploy the technology is the biggest obstacle in adopting Web 2.0 technologies. The trends and initiatives discussed herein are supported by the “Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007” survey conducted by Equation Research during the fourth quarter of 2007. 4 www.awarenessnetworks.com
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Table of contents 6. Methodology 6. Demographics 7. 2007 Trends in Web 2.0 Usage 9. Personal-use Social Networking at Work 9. Success with Web 2.0 Technologies 9. Obstacles in Web 2.0 Adoption: Resources and Security 10. Ideal Capabilities for Social Media Initiatives 11. Positive Impact of Web 2.0 Use 12. The Future of Web 2.0 Adoption: 2008 and Beyond www.awarenessnetworks.com 5
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Methodology Because of the large number of professionals who participated in this survey, we are 95 percent confident that the responses of the population to the survey questions would be +/- 9.3 percent from the figures stated herein. The survey was sent via email to approximately 60,000 professionals during the fourth quarter of 2007, and 112 participants completed the survey, which was live for 18 days. Each respondent answered the questionnaire via an online survey tool and was assured of his or her confidentiality. Their responses were used to drive the results and conclusions of this report and will be used only in this aggregate analysis. Demographics The demographic composition of the respondent pool provides a representative sample of enterprise-size businesses. Almost two-thirds of respondents are from enterprise-size organizations (those with more than 1,000 employees), which provides an accurate and higher-level assessment of Web 2.0 technology adoption in companies of that size. Respondents represent a variety of roles within the organization. While almost a quarter hold senior-executive level positions, 41 percent are from the management level. Likewise, respondents came from a range of departments, but the greatest factions work in the marketing/advertising and technology/IT departments of their organizations. *Respondents were given the option to pick more than one department. 6 www.awarenessnetworks.com
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 2007 Trends in Web 2.0 Usage Fifty-nine percent of all respondents’ organizations currently use Web 2.0 technologies, including 92 percent of professionals in the business development/strategy department and 63 percent of marketing/advertising professionals. More than half of enterprise-size organizations utilize Web 2.0 technologies (54 percent), as do 74 percent of companies with less than 500 employees. The majority of respondents using Web 2.0 technologies employ a combination of internal- and external-facing tools (64 percent). Those using a combination of internal- and external-facing tools include 58 percent of respondents at enterprise-size companies. Blogs are the most used Web 2.0 technology (selected by 87 percent of respondents), followed by communities, wikis, RSS feeds and social networking. Eighty-four percent of all respondents’ organizations provide information in RSS format, among them 92 percent of professionals in the marketing/advertising department. More than two-thirds of all respondents’ companies provide them with software to subscribe to RSS feeds (69 percent). (See graph below for more information.) www.awarenessnetworks.com 7
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Open-ended responses from survey participants about the effectiveness of the most used Web 2.0 technologies: Blogs: • “They help us position our brand and talk with potential prospects/customers.” • “The blog has become so popular that we’ve added RSS and email alerts so people can more easily access the information on an ongoing basis when they need it. We also plan to launch another external blog in 2008.” • “Helping us share voices of passionate experts, join conversations about technology thought leadership, collect and reply to public comments, respond quickly to concerns or issues.” Communities: • “As a global company, our community has proven to connect people worldwide in many ways that traditional mediums like email and IM did not. Community management and tools helped encourage networking, discussion and collaboration.” • “Gives people an opportunity to quickly and easily grow their network and get fast answers to their business problems from peers.” • “…It’s done a lot to relieve lower-level support challenges because people can help each other given their shared experiences.” • “It provides a good platform for evangelistic outreach and allows us to tap into what our customers really think.” Wikis: • “We’ve successfully used wikis as a way to capture documentation and information sharing internally. Don’t see something? Upload it yourself. Something is incorrect? Edit it yourself.” • “Our employees are using it to consistently document our processes and procedures.” • “It’s a great way to share competitive and market intelligence internally, allowing us to better track developments in the industry, as well as keep up to date on the activities of our competitors and industry partners.” • “…wikis with built-in version control/management are THE way to collaborate on docs.” RSS: • “RSS is great for those who don’t have time to continuously surf the websites for communities, forums or blogs. It lets them view our content from the convenience of a single application or interface (the RSS reader).” • “RSS has helped internal and external customers get the information they want, when the want it to their preferred delivery method.” 8 www.awarenessnetworks.com
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Personal-use Social Networking at Work Of those respondents whose organizations currently use Web 2.0 technologies, just more than a third (37 percent) are allowed to use personal-use social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace for business purposes at work. Only 23 percent of all respondents use Facebook for business purposes at work. However, a recent study by email research specialist emedia revealed that 48 percent of social networking site users admitted accessing them at work, and one in four reported logging in daily.1 More than half of respondents are from organizations where employees are requesting to use social networking sites for business purposes at work (58 percent). Five out of six professionals in the PR department desire this ability, as do 65 percent of marketing/advertising departments. Success with Web 2.0 Technologies Respondents reported that the most successful uses of Web 2.0 technologies in their or- ganizations are blogs (44 percent), communities (42 percent) and wikis (39 percent). Ninety-six percent report that all Web 2.0 technologies they’ve used have been success- ful, with 83 percent reporting no clear failures. These facts lend support to the more than half of all respondents who say they need quantifiable ROI metrics before deploying social media for business purposes (59 percent). This requirement is a challenge for many advocates of Web 2.0 technologies. Despite their success and effectiveness, many collab- orative Web 2.0 technologies such as blogs and wikis are known for their lack of quan- tifiable ROI.2 However, this should not deter organizations from leveraging these tools, as the benefits they provide are evident — even if not quantifiable. Obstacles in Web 2.0 Adoption: Resources and Security 1 “News Digest: Social Networking Worries.” Two-thirds of respondents say that having limited internal resources to deploy the tech- PC World Business. December 2007. nology is an obstacle in adopting Web 2.0 technologies; 83 percent of respondents in 2 “Adoption of Web 2.0 Is Taking Off, but the marketing/advertising department agree. Additionally, a limited budget to deploy the Some Firms Are Still Reluctant.” Bank Sysems & Technology. technology is a challenge for 58 percent of respondents. Another obstacle in enterprise March 30, 2007. adoption of Web 2.0 technologies is the fact that more than half of respondents report that they don’t know what social media can do for the company (53 percent), including 3 “Internet and Web 2.0 Creates Unfamiliar Battleground for HR Professionals.” 73 percent of senior executives. A study of 700 HR decision makers in the United States Dec. 5, 2007. conducted by content security specialist Clearswift revealed that 23 percent (or nearly one in four) of HR decision makers are unfamiliar with Web 2.0 technologies.3 www.awarenessnetworks.com 9
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Almost two-thirds of survey participants said they are limited by concerns about security, moderation and control (64 percent), especially those in organizations with more than 5,000 employees and those in the marketing/advertising, creative design and public relations departments. “The rapid development of communications technologies—and the potential for both business benefit and employee misuse—poses a significant challenge for HR professionals,” said Stephen Millard, vice president of strategy at Clearswift.4 The majority of respondents prohibited from using personal-use social networking sites for business purposes at work are restricted because there is no security (61 percent), there’s no content moderation (44 percent) and for fear of leaking confidential information (39 percent). These security concerns aren’t unfounded: The Clearswift study showed that 14 percent of HR professionals have had to discipline employees for such confidential data leakage, and another 7 percent administered disciplinary actions for employees who had posted inappropriate content on social media websites, blogs and wikis.5 Of those not currently using Web 2.0 technologies, 72 percent are not allowed to use personal use social networking sites for business purposes at work because of concerns about lowered productivity (85 percent) and various security concerns, including the possibility for leaking confidential information (58 percent), a lack of content moderation (39 percent) and the ownership of intellectual property placed on those sites (31 percent). However, almost half of those respondents said they would be allowed to use a social networking product if it addressed those concerns (42 percent). Ideal Capabilities for Social Media Initiatives Across the board, security remains the most important capability of a social media initiative, selected by 88 percent of all respondents. Workflow (chosen by 72 percent of respondents) came in second, followed by integration with identity management systems (67 percent). Permissioning (66 percent) and moderation (49 percent) are also important capabilities, especially for organizations with more than 1,000 employees. Likewise, almost two-thirds of respondents reported that broad support of Web 2.0 technologies is important to their organizations (63 percent). Social networking features are the least important capabilities to all respondents. (See graph below for more information.) 10 www.awarenessnetworks.com
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Positive Impact of Web 2.0 Use Across the board, almost all respondents report that internal-facing online social media will improve communication and collaboration (91 percent). Further, 78 percent believe such Web 2.0 technologies will improve knowledge management within their organizations, and 81 percent think it will aid in locating experts inside the office. With improved communication, collaboration and knowledge management, as well as better identification of experts within the office, productivity is likely to increase—and respondents agree. Approximately two-thirds believe such internal-facing social media initiatives would have a positive impact on enhancing productivity, including 75 percent of management and the marketing/advertising and public relations department. More than two-thirds of all respondents believe that utilizing external-facing online social media in the workplace will increase customer engagement (68 percent), including 70 percent of senior executives and 75 percent of the marketing/advertising department. Sixty-four percent think these initiatives will help increase brand awareness and loyalty. More than half of all respondents believe external facing technologies will aid in producing effective market research (58 percent), including 69 percent of the marketing/advertising department and 75 percent of the public relations department. While just 39 percent of all respondents believe these initiatives will have a positive impact on generating revenue, more than half of those in the marketing/advertising and public relations departments believe it will—as do 80 percent of those in the sales department. (See graph below for more information.) www.awarenessnetworks.com 11
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 The Future of Web 2.0 Adoption: 2008 and Beyond Twenty percent of enterprise-size organizations have a budget of more than $50,000 for social media over the next 12 months. Almost half of all respondents (47 percent) plan to deploy an internal-facing community in 2008 or 2009. A quarter plan to do so in the next six months. The top internal-facing Web 2.0 technologies respondents plan to deploy are blogs and wikis (56 percent each). Forty-four percent of respondents plan to utilize an external-facing community within the next six to 24 months. Of those, two- thirds will deploy online communities, and 62 percent will utilize blogs. In addition, more than half of respondents plan to revamp their external-facing websites (59 percent). As respondents’ plans for 2008 and 2009 indicate, Web 2.0 technologies will become the standard in the near future. As more businesses realize the benefits these types of solutions have to offer and the success other companies have seen through such applications, adoption of Web 2.0 technologies will increase exponentially. Security, however, will continue to be a great concern for the majority of users and non-users alike. To combat these safety risks, organizations must adopt sophisticated security solutions that will protect them while still allowing them to benefit from the collaborative nature of Web 2.0 technologies. 12 www.awarenessnetworks.com
    • Trends in Adopting Web 2.0 for the Enterprise in 2007 Contact Information: About Awareness Awareness, Inc. Awareness helps companies build and operate branded Web 2.0 communities. These online 880 Winter Street, Suite 300 communities let customers, prospects, employees, or partners connect with each other and share Waltham, MA 02451 content. At the core of the Awareness solution is an on-demand social media platform that combines the full range of Web 2.0 technologies—blogs, wikis, discussion groups, social United States networking, podcasts, RSS, tagging, photos, videos, mapping, etc.—with security, control, and Tel: 1 866 487 5623 content moderation. Awareness builds these features into complete communities for companies, Fax: 1 781 622 2378 or customers use the Awareness API and widgets to integrate Web 2.0 technologies into their own web properties. Major corporations such as McDonald's, Kodak, the New York Times, Awareness Canada Northwestern Mutual, and Procter and Gamble use Awareness to build brand loyalty, generate revenue, drive new forms of marketing, improve collaboration, encourage knowledge-sharing, 5050 South Service Road, Suite 100 and build a “corporate memory.” Burlington, ON L7L 5Y7 Canada Tel: 1 866 487 5623 Fax: 1 905 632 4922 © 2008 AWARENESS, INC.