Ch02 body organization_2013

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Ch02 body organization_2013

  1. 1. Copyright ©2011 Michael L. Whitchurch, MHS All rights reserved.Medical Terminology for Health ProfessionalsProfessor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFlorida State College of JacksonvilleThe Body in Health and Disease
  2. 2. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSLearning Objectives1. Describe approaches used to organize informationabout the human body.2. Identify body directions, body cavities, body systems,and medical specialties.3. Describe various categories of diseases.4. Describe techniques used to perform a physicalexamination.
  3. 3. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSLearning Objectives5. Describe categories of healthcare professionals andsettings in which health care is provided.6. Give the medical meaning of word parts related to thebody, health, and disease.7. Build medical words about the body, health, anddisease from word parts and divide and define words.
  4. 4. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSLearning Objectives8. Spell and pronounce medical words about the body,health, and disease.9. Dive deeper into the body, health, and disease byreviewing the activities at the end of this chapter andonline at Medical Terminology Interactive.
  5. 5. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Body in Health• Seven different approaches for studying the body:– Body planes and body directions approach– Body cavities approach– Quadrants and regions approach– Anatomy and physiology approach– Microscopic-to-macroscopic approach– Body systems approach– Medical specialties approach
  6. 6. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHuman body in anatomical position
  7. 7. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Planes and Body Directions Approach• When the human body is in anatomical position, it canbe studied by dividing it with planes.• A plane is an imaginary flat surface, like a plate of glass.• Three body planes:– coronal plane– sagittal plane– transverse plane
  8. 8. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Planes and Body Directions Approach• These body planes divide the body into front and back,right and left, and top and bottom sections.• Body directions represent movement away from ortoward those planes.
  9. 9. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Coronal Plane and Body Directions• The coronal plane (or frontal plane)is a vertical plane that divides thebody into front and back sections.• The coronal plane is named for thecoronal suture in the cranium.
  10. 10. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-2 Coronal plane
  11. 11. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-3 Coronal and sagittal sutures of the cranium
  12. 12. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Coronal Plane and Body Directions• The front of the body is theanterior or ventral section• The back of the body is theposterior or dorsal section
  13. 13. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Coronal Plane and Body DirectionsLying with the anterior section of the body down is being inthe prone position.
  14. 14. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Coronal Plane and Body DirectionsLying with the posterior section of the body down is beingin the dorsal or supine position.
  15. 15. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-4 Anterior and posterior directions
  16. 16. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-5 Posteroanterior direction
  17. 17. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Sagittal Plane and Body Directions• A vertical plane that divides thebody into right and left sectionsis a sagittal plane• Named for the sagittal suture inthe cranium
  18. 18. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Sagittal Plane and Body Directions• If this plane divides the bodyanywhere to the left or rightof the midline, it is aparasagittal plane.• If this plane divides the bodyat the midline into equalright and left sections, then itis a midsagittal plane.
  19. 19. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Sagittal Plane and Body Directions• Moving from the side of thebody toward the midline ismoving in a medialdirection, or medially.• Moving from the midlinetoward the side of the bodyis moving in a lateraldirection, or laterally.
  20. 20. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-6 Sagittal plane
  21. 21. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-7 Midsagittal view of the head on an MRI scan(DR Unique/Custom Medical Stock Photo, Inc.)
  22. 22. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-8 Medial and lateral are directional opposites
  23. 23. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Transverse Plane and Body Directions• Horizontal plane thatdivides the body into topand bottom sections.• The upper half of the bodyis the superior section, andthe lower half is the inferiorsection.
  24. 24. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-9 Transverse plane
  25. 25. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Transverse Plane and Body Directions• Moving toward the head ismoving in a superior direction,or superiorly.– This is also the cephalad direction.• Moving toward the tail bone ismoving in an inferior direction,or inferiorly.– This is also the caudad direction.
  26. 26. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOther Body Directions and Positions• Moving from the bodytoward the end of a limb(arm or leg) is moving in adistal direction, or distally.• Moving from the end of alimb toward where it isattached to the body ismoving in a proximaldirection, or proximally.
  27. 27. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-10 Superior and inferior parts
  28. 28. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-11 Cephalad and caudad directions
  29. 29. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-12 Distal and proximal directions
  30. 30. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOther Body Directions and Positions• Structures on the surface of the body are superficial orexternal structures.• Structures below the surface and inside the body aredeep or internal structures.
  31. 31. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-13 External and internal positions
  32. 32. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Cavities Approach• The human body can bestudied according to itsbody cavities and theirinternal organs.• A cavity is a hollow spacethat is surrounded bybones or muscles.• The cranial cavity lieswithin and is protected bythe cranium.
  33. 33. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Cavities Approach• The spinal cavity or spinalcanal is a continuation of thecranial cavity as it travelsdown the midline of the back.• The spinal cavity lies withinand is protected by the bones(vertebrae) of the spinalcolumn.• The spinal cavity contains thespinal cord, the spinal nerves,and spinal fluid.
  34. 34. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Cavities Approach• The thoracic cavity lies withinthe chest and is protected bythe breast bone (sternum)anteriorly, the ribs laterally, andthe spinal column posteriorly.• The inferior border of thethoracic cavity is the large,muscular diaphragm thatfunctions during respiration.• The thoracic cavity contains thelungs.
  35. 35. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Cavities Approach• The abdominal cavity lieswithin the abdomen and isprotected by the bones of thespinal column posteriorly.• The pelvic cavity is acontinuation of the abdominalcavity and lies within and isprotected by the pelvic bonesanteriorly and laterally.• These two cavities are oftenreferred to as theabdominopelvic cavity.
  36. 36. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-14 Body cavities
  37. 37. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSQuadrants and Regions Approach• The human body can bestudied according to itsquadrants and regions.• The anterior surface of theabdominopelvic area can bedivided into four quadrantsor nine regions.
  38. 38. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSQuadrants and Regions ApproachThe four quadrants include:Right upper quadrant (RUQ)Left upper quadrant (LUQ)Left lower quadrant (LLQ)Right lower quadrant (RLQ)
  39. 39. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-15 Quadrants of the abdominopelvic area
  40. 40. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSQuadrants and Regions ApproachThe nine regions include the:Right and left hypochondriac regions.Epigastric region.Right and left lumbar regions.Umbilical region.Right and left inguinal or iliac regions.Hypogastric region.
  41. 41. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-16 Regions of the abdominopelvic area
  42. 42. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSAnatomy and Physiology Approach• Anatomy is the study of thestructures of the human body.• Physiology is the study of thefunction of those structures.
  43. 43. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMicroscopic-to-Macroscopic Approach• Most cells and cellular structuresare microscopic in size and canbe seen only through amicroscope.• Some cells, such as a femaleovum, are large enough to beseen with the naked eye.• Cells combine to form tissues,and tissues combine to formorgans.
  44. 44. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-17 Using a microscope to study the human body(microscope: Custom Medical Stock Photo, Inc.; heart muscle: Michael Abbey/PhotoResearchers, Inc.
  45. 45. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMicroscopic-to-Macroscopic Approach (cont)• Tissues and organs aremacroscopic, that is, they canbe seen with the naked eye.• Organs combine to form abody system.• The human body containsseveral different bodysystems.
  46. 46. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Systems ApproachThe human body can be studiedaccording to its various organsand how they function togetherin a body system.– Gastrointestinal (Gl) system– Respiratory system– Cardiovascular (CV) system– Blood– Lymphatic system– Integumentary system
  47. 47. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Systems ApproachThe human body can be studiedaccording to its variousorgans and how they functiontogether in a body system.– Skeletal system– Muscular system– Nervous system– Urinary system– Male genital and reproductivesystem– Female genital and reproductivesystem
  48. 48. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSBody Systems ApproachThe human body can bestudied according to itsvarious organs and howthey function together in abody system.– Endocrine system– Eyes– Ears, nose, and throat (ENT)system
  49. 49. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties andBody Systems Approach• The human body can be studied according to themedical specialties that make up the practice ofmedicine.• Each medical specialty includes the anatomy,physiology, diseases, diagnostic tests, medical andsurgical procedures, and drugs for that body system.
  50. 50. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach (con’t)• Gastroenterology– Gastrointestinal system– A gastroenterologist is a physicianwho specializes in gastroenterology.
  51. 51. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach (con’t)• Pulmonology– Respiratory system– A pulmonologist is a physician whospecializes in pulmonology.
  52. 52. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach• Cardiology– Cardiovascular system– A cardiologist is a physician whospecializes in cardiology.
  53. 53. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach• Hematology– Blood– A hematologist is a physician whospecializes in hematology.• Immunology– Blood, lymphatic system– A immunologist is a physician whospecializes in immunology
  54. 54. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach (con’t)• Dermatology– Integumentary system– A dermatologist is a physicianwho specializes indermatology.
  55. 55. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach (con’t)• Orthopedics– Skeletal system– An orthopedist is a physician who specializes in orthopedics.
  56. 56. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach• Orthopedics– Muscular system
  57. 57. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach• Neurology– Nervous system– A neurologist is a physician whospecializes in neurology.
  58. 58. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach (con’t)• Urology– Urinary system– A urologist is a physician whospecializes in urology.
  59. 59. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach• Male Reproductive Medicine– Male genital and reproductive system– A reproductive specialist is aphysician who specializes inreproductive medicine.
  60. 60. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach (con’t)• Gynecology and Obstetrics– Female genital and reproductivesystem– A gynecologist is a physicianwho specializes in gynecology.A obstetrician is a physicianwho specializes in obstetrics.
  61. 61. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach• Endocrinology– Endocrine system– An endocrinologist is a physicianwho specializes in endocrinology.
  62. 62. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach• Ophthalmology– Eyes– An ophthalmologist is a physicianwho specializes in ophthalmology.
  63. 63. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSMedical Specialties Approach (con’t)• Otolaryngology– Ears, nose, and throat (ENT) system– An otolaryngologist is a physician who specializes inotolaryngology.
  64. 64. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOther Medical Specialties• Other medical specialties that are not directly related to abody system include the following:Medical Specialty Descriptionpsychiatry study and treatment of the mindoncology study and treatment of cancerradiology and nuclearmedicineuse of x-rays, sound waves, and otherforms of radiation and energy todiagnose and treat diseasedentistry study and treatment of the teeth andgums
  65. 65. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOther Medical SpecialtiesMedical Specialty Descriptiondietetics study and use of nutrition, nutrients, anddietpharmacology study of drugs used as medicinesneonatology study and treatment of newborn infantspediatrics study and treatment of infants and childrengeriatrics study and treatment of the elderly
  66. 66. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Body in Disease• Preventive medicine is the healthcare specialtythat focuses on keeping a person healthy andpreventing disease.• Much of medical language deals with diseasesand how they are diagnosed and treated.• Disease is any change in the normal structureor function of the body.
  67. 67. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSThe Body in Disease• The etiology is the cause or originof a disease.• In most cases, the cause of a diseaseis known or can be discoveredthrough medical testing. In somecases, the exact cause of a disease isnever completely understood.
  68. 68. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSDisease Categories• Congenital• Degenerative• Environmental• Hereditary• Iatrogenic• Idiopathic• Infectious• Neoplastic• Nosocomial• Nutritional
  69. 69. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOnset, Course, and Outcome of Disease• The onset of disease is often noticed because ofsymptoms and/or signs.• A symptom is any deviation from health that is perceivedor felt by the patient.• When a symptom can be seen or detected by others, it isknown as a sign.
  70. 70. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOnset, Course, and Outcome of Disease• Symptomatology is the clinical picture of all the patient’ssymptoms and signs.• A syndrome is a set of symptoms and signs associatedwith, and characteristic of, one particular disease.• Patients who are asymptomatic (showing no symptomsor signs) can still have a disease, but it can only bedetected by medical tests.
  71. 71. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOnset, Course, and Outcome of Disease• The physician takes a history and performs a physicalexamination.• For the history of the present illness, the physician asksthe patient in detail about the location, onset, duration,and severity of the symptoms.• The physician also asks about the patient’s past medicalhistory, past surgical history, family history, socialhistory, and history of allergies to drugs.• After taking the patient’s history, the physician performsa physical examination to look for signs of disease.
  72. 72. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOnset, Course, and Outcome of Disease• The physician uses the following techniques (as needed)during the physical examination: inspection, palpation,auscultation, and percussion.• After taking the patient’s history and performing thephysical examination, the physician makes a diagnosisthat identifies the nature and cause of the disease orcondition.
  73. 73. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-18 Inspection(S. O’Brien/Custom Medical Stock Photo, Inc.)
  74. 74. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-19 Palpation(Michal Heron/Pearson Education/PH College)
  75. 75. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-20 Auscultation(Corbis RF)
  76. 76. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSFigure 2-21 Percussion(Michal Heron/Pearson Education/PH College)
  77. 77. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOnset, Course, and Outcome of Disease• If the physician cannot make a diagnosis, the patient isscheduled to undergo further diagnostic tests or referredto a specialist.• Symptoms and signs may be:– Acute (sudden and severe)– Subacute (less severe in intensity), or– Chronic (continuing for 3 months or more)
  78. 78. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOnset, Course, and Outcome of Disease• An exacerbation is a sudden worsening in the severity ofthe symptoms or signs.• A sequela is an abnormal condition or complication thatarises because of the original disease and remains afterthe original disease has resolved.• Remission is a temporary improvement in the symptomsand signs of a disease without the underlying diseasebeing cured.• A relapse or recurrence is a return of the originalsymptoms and signs of the disease.
  79. 79. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOnset, Course, and Outcome of Disease• The physician prescribes drugs or orders some type oftherapy for the patient.• If the treatment is therapeutic, the symptoms or signs ofthe disease disappear.• A disease that is refractory (resistant) to treatment is onethat does not respond to treatment.
  80. 80. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSOnset, Course, and Outcome of Disease• Certain diseases that cannot be treated with drugs ortherapy may require surgery.• The prognosis is the predicted outcome of a disease.• The course of a disease can have one of threeoutcomes:– Recuperation or recovery– Disability– Terminal illness
  81. 81. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Professionals and HealthcareSettings• Physician– The leader of the healthcare team who examines the patient,orders tests, diagnoses diseases, and treats diseases byprescribing drugs or therapy.– Surgeons are physicians who complete additional training insurgery.• Physician– Primary care physicians (PCPs) specialize in family practice orpediatrics.– A physician who is on the medical staff of a hospital and admitsa patient to the hospital is known as the attending physician.
  82. 82. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Professionals andHealthcare Settings• Physician Extenders– PEs are healthcare professionals who work under thesupervision of a physician (M.D. or D.O.).– PEs examine, diagnose, and treat patients and prescribemedications.– Physician extenders include physician’s assistants (PAs), nursepractitioners (NPs), certified nurse midwives (CNMs), andcertified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNAs).
  83. 83. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Professionals andHealthcare Settings• Nurse– Allied health professional– Examines patients, makes nursing diagnoses, and administerstreatments or drugs ordered by the physician.– Often gives hands-on care and focuses on the physical andemotional needs of the patient and the family.
  84. 84. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Professionals andHealthcare Settings• Other Allied Health Professionals– Technologists– Technicians– Therapists– Dietitians– Medical assistants– Phlebotomists– Dental hygienists– Audiologists
  85. 85. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Settings• Hospital– A hospital provides care for acutely ill patients who requiremedical or surgical care for longer than 24 hours.– A physician must write an order in the patient’s medical record toadmit or discharge the patient.– A patient in the hospital is an inpatient.• Hospital– Ancillary departments in the hospital provide additional types ofservices and include radiology, physical therapy, dietary,emergency, clinical laboratory, and pharmacy.
  86. 86. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Settings• Physician’s Office– Most frequently used healthcare setting.– A single physician (or group of physicians) maintains an officewhere patients are seen, diagnosed, treated, and counseled.– Some offices have their own laboratory and x-ray equipmentfor performing diagnostic tests.– Seriously ill patients who cannot be quickly diagnosed oradequately treated in the office are sent to a hospital.
  87. 87. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Settings (cont)• Clinic– Provides healthcare services for just one type of patient or onetype of disease.– For example, a well-baby clinic provides care to newborn infants.– Outpatient clinics are located in a hospital and their patients(outpatients) are not admitted to the hospital and do not stayovernight in the clinic.• Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC)– An ASC is a facility where minor surgery is performed and thepatient does not stay overnight.
  88. 88. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Settings• Long-Term Care Facility– A residential facility for elderly or disabled persons who areunable to care for themselves– Provides 24-hour nursing care– Persons in long-term care facilities are residents rather thanpatients.• Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF)– Long-term care facility that provides a high level of medical andnursing care for patients recently discharged from the hospital.
  89. 89. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Settings• Home Health Agency– Provides a range ofhealthcare services topersons (clients) in theirhomes when they areunable to come to aphysician’s office or clinicand do not want to live ina long-term care facility.(Andy Levin/Photo Researchers, Inc.)
  90. 90. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSHealthcare Settings• Hospice– A facility for patients who are dying from a terminal illness– Their physicians have certified that they have less than 6 monthsto live– Hospice services include: Palliative care Counseling Emotional support for the patient and family
  91. 91. Copyright ©2011 All rights reserved.Florida State College of Jacksonville | Professor: Michael L. Whitchurch, MHSAbbreviations

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