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Narrative Stores

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  • 1.  Myths  Legends  Fantasies  Adventures › Remember, to narrate a story means to tell it in detail
  • 2.  What makes up a myth? › Usually historical › Religion-Based › Fabricated or stretched  Myths you may know: › Noah’s Ark
  • 3.  What makes up a legend? › Story from the past › Unverifiable  Legends you may know: › Robin Hood › King Arthur
  • 4.  What makes up a fantasy? › Non-realistic › Out-of-World  Fantasies you may know: › Harry Potter › The Wizard of Oz
  • 5.  What makes up on adventure? › Exciting › Dangerous › Hero’s  Adventures you may know: › Indiana Jones
  • 6.  Paper and Pencil › First draft only  Peer editor › Read peers paper › Give feedback  Positive & Negative  Computer › Final draft will be typed
  • 7.  All of the following are included: › Setting › Characters › Theme › Plot  They must relate to each other!
  • 8.  What is setting? › Surroundings and environment of story  What is it’s purpose? › To set the scene  Location and time period
  • 9.  What are characters? › People who act out the story  What are the types of characters? › Main characters  Who the story revolves around › Helping characters  Play important, but not focal points
  • 10.  What is theme? › The main idea of the story  There may be more than one  What are examples of theme? › Death › Love › Revenge
  • 11.  What is plot? › The storyline or plan of the story  What are examples of plot? › Man who escaped from giant creature › Girl who was haunted by friendly ghosts › Dog who needs to find his way home
  • 12.  Think of a favorite story  Apply it to one of the categories  Myth, Legend, Fantasy, Adventure  Use your imagination!  Have an open mind!
  • 13.  Which category describes your story?  Do you have all the literary components? › Setting, plot, characters, & theme
  • 14.  Story must be typed, 12 point font, double spaced  Paragraph format  Introduction & Conclusion  Minimum 1 page  Maximum 2 pages
  • 15.  Merriam Webster Online. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Merriam Webster website: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/narrated  Merriam Webster Online. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Merriam Webster website: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/myth  Merriam Webster Online. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Merriam Webster website: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/legend  Wikipedia the Free Encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from http://en.wikipedia.org/ wiki/Legend  Merriam Webster Online. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from Merriam Webster website: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/fantasy  Dictionary. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ adventure+  The Difference Between Myths and Legends. (n.d.). About.com. Retrieved October 1, 2009, from http://ancienthistory.about.com/cs/grecoromanmyth1/a/mythslegends.htm  Dictionary. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ setting http://fictionwriting.about.com/od/glossary/g/theme.htm  Dictionary. (n.d.). Retrieved October 1, 2009, from http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ plot  Clipart from Microsoft.

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