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  • 1. CHAPTER 18 Section 1: Setting the Stage for War Section 2: World War I: A New Kind of War Section 3: The Russian Revolution Section 4: The Terms of Peace Section 5: Creating a “New” Europe World War I and the Russian Revolution
  • 2. SECTION 2 Bell Ringer 18.2: What were the advantages of both the Central and Allied Powers? World War I: A New Kind of War Advantages of the Central Powers Advantages of the Allied Powers
  • 3. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 4. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 5. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 6. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 7. Innovations in Warfare SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War It happened everywhere, on the ground and underground, on the water and under water, and in the air. It was fought using every possible means, from cavalry charges to hand-to-hand trench warfare, from bombardments to assault tanks, using gas or phosphorus.
  • 8. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Unterseeboot Submarine
  • 9. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Hiram Maxim first offered use of the machine gun to Britain in 1885 but they could see no real use for it… Not so the German army which quickly produced a version of Maxim's invention in large quantities; by the time war broke out in August 1914 the Germans had 12,000 at their disposal, a number which eventually ballooned to 100,000. In contrast the British and French had access to a mere few hundred equivalents when war began.
  • 10. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Artillery
  • 11. Trench Warfare SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 12. Chemical Weapons SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 13. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Airplanes von Richthofen was a German fighter pilot known as the " Red Baron ". He was the most successful flying ace during World War I, being officially credited with 80 confirmed air combat victories.
  • 14. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Tank
  • 15. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Propaganda
  • 16. Early Years of the War SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 17. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Battle of the Marne … changed the course of the war – Now it would be a war of attrition.
  • 18. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Battle of Tannenberg only 10,000 of the 150,000 Russian troops escaped.
  • 19. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Gallipoli
  • 20. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Britain decided to blockade Germany …. Ruining the German economy and starving the German people. . .but the Germans would also disrupt shipping to Britain using its u-boats to sink incoming ships.
  • 21. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War 7 May 1915 She was torpedoed by a German U-boat on 7 May 1915 and sank in 18 minutes, eight miles off the coast of Ireland, killing 1,198 of the 1,959 people aboard – over 100 children died. Only six of the 48 lifeboats were launched. Tragedy on the Seas . . .
  • 22. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War President Wilson denounced the attack on the Lusitania and warned that the US would not tolerate the German unrestricted submarine warfare. Germany cut back on u-boat attacks.
  • 23. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 24. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War The war now became a war of attrition. . . . A stalemate.
  • 25. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War The United States believed that it should be neutral . . . this was a European conflict . . . Americans dealt with both sides during the conflict. But British propaganda had a great influence in the States. ‘ A most dastardly crime by a callous foe murdering innocent women, children and men, which should bring upon the whole German nation the execration of the whole civilised world.’ British newspaper quote on the sinking of the Lusitania.
  • 26. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War British newspapers accused German soldiers of a series of crimes including: gouging out the eyes of civilians, cutting off the hands of teenage boys, raping and sexually mutilating women, giving children hand grenades to play with, bayoneting babies and the crucifixion of captured soldiers. Atrocities Norman Lindsay, The Bulletin (1916)
  • 27. Several developments push the U.S. toward war . . . SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War The British intercept a coded telegram from the German foreign minister Arthur Zimmerman . . . sent to the German ambassador in Mexico. Jackpot!
  • 28. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Germany resumes unrestricted submarine warfare.
  • 29. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War President Wilson addresses Congress on 6 April 1917 saying that “the world must be made safe for democracy.”
  • 30. Visual Source World War I: A New Kind of War Cartoon showing alleged German atrocities during World War One
  • 31. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
  • 32. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War 1915: German propaganda from World War I consisting of a dummy in a cage with the message that the English must take a beating.
  • 33. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War German poster 1915
  • 34. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War The German military was fairly large at the beginning of the war, and since the German government had effectively portrayed their struggle as defensive, the German populace was swept up in a nationalistic fervor. 
  • 35. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War In this cartoon the Germans are portrayed as a bull running amok in a "neutral china shop" bearing the flags of the neutral nations. The caption reads: "I shall tell everybody that I was goaded into it." The point of the cartoon is that the Germans would attack neutral countries, such as Belgium, with the excuse that they had been provoked by the actions of the victims. The original cartoon appeared in the British satirical magazine Punch, during the early part of the War.
  • 36. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War Ready for your quiz? Get your notes for Section 2. HW:Read Section 3 and be sure to take notes! Listen to this letter from a soldier in the trenches …
  • 37. SECTION 2 World War I: A New Kind of War
        •  more soldiers
    Advantages of the Central Powers
        •  territory that extended from the North Sea to the Middle East
    Advantages of the Allied Powers
        •  Germany’s army
        •  greater industrial capacity
        •  Britain’s navy