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Prof. Phil Robinson - Supporting Children of Parents with Mental Illness
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Prof. Phil Robinson - Supporting Children of Parents with Mental Illness

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A presentation given by Prof. Phil Robinson at The Journey, CHA Conference 2012, in the 'Innovations in Mental Health Care for Children and Young People' stream.

A presentation given by Prof. Phil Robinson at The Journey, CHA Conference 2012, in the 'Innovations in Mental Health Care for Children and Young People' stream.

Published in: Health & Medicine
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  • Given the number of times over the years that children of parents with a mental illness have been the subject of presentations at TheMHS, we trust that most people in the audience realise that children of parents with a mental illness are at greater risk than their peers of developing mental illness themselves but that risk doesn’t equal destiny and there are many ways that that risk can be reduced. If you want to know more about the prevention side of things please visit us at our booth in the Hall – we’ll be very happy to talk to you there.
  • Show and example of an info sheet:Each Info sheet has been constructed to:Provide helpful information related to the subject areaQuotes from dads; kids; health workers to encourage dads‘What you can do’ suggestionsSupport numbers.
  • Whilst the theme for workers (as can be seen on this promotional mouse mat and associated wallet cards) is “Think about Dad...do it for his kids”
  • COPMI operates under the umbrella organisation of AICAFMHA and receives it’s funding from Australian Government Dept Health & Ageing
  • Transcript

    • 1. COPMInational initiativePhil Robinson
    • 2. COPMI national initiative AIM: To promote better mental health outcomes for children of parents with a mental illness.
    • 3. Why COPMI? Children of parents with a mental illness are at greater risk than their peers of developing mental illness themselves but ... risk doesn’t equal destiny ... and there are many ways that the risk can be reduced.
    • 4. Resilience  Its not about individuals being ‘hardy’  Resilience changes in response to multiple factors (such as supportive relationships, community environments) There is evidence for a range of ‘risk’ factors but there may be others that haven’t been identified.
    • 5. Studies highlight these resiliencefactors  Parent receiving treatment/support  Child understands their parent’s mental illness  Child can communicate with parents about the mental illness  Child knows they are not to blame/responsible  Child has access to a supportive adult  Child participates in a range of activities outside of the home  Child has close friends  Child pursues their own interests The child has a sense of hope about the future
    • 6. Key statistics Up to 1 in 5 Australian young people live in families with a parent who has a mental illness. Offspring of depressed parents found to have a 3-fold increase in depression, anxiety and substance dependence when compared with those whose parents had no diagnosis. Weissman et al 2006 (large longitudinal study over 20 years)
    • 7. Key statistics ... (Australian) children with a parent who attend mental health services are between two to five times more likely than the norm to be scoring in the clinical range on the SDQ. Maybery et al, 2009
    • 8. Multi-component approach to preventionfor children of parents with a mental illness Hosman & Van Doesum, Prevention Research Centre, Nijmegen University 2000
    • 9. Prior to the COPMI initiativeScoping study undertakenby AICAFMHA tounderstand the generalresponse to calls for servicesfor children of parents witha mental illness by thosesuch as Brain Burdekin in hislandmark report into humanrights and mental illness.Released in 2001.
    • 10. 2002 - 2004 Developing and promoting ‘Principles and Actions for Services and People Working with Children Of Parents with a Mental Illness’ Involved broad consultation across Australia with those with lived experience, plus workers and administrators and a extensive literature review.
    • 11. 2002 - 2004 Developing and promoting information resources for families and for professionals (e.g. booklets, website, translations)
    • 12. Past priorities 2004 - 2012 Education of the mental health workforce (standards, MH Pod, Keeping Families and Children in Mind’ e-learning and group educator training)
    • 13. Past priorities 2004 - 2012 Education partnerships with key stakeholders such as MindMatters and KidsMatter (Primary and Early Childhood)
    • 14. Past priorities 2004 - 2012 Supporting evidence-based practice (e.g. GEMS and tools for evaluation of programs and services on our website) and research ‘clearinghouse’ Training and mentoring for program evaluators
    • 15. Past priorities 2004 - 2012 Development of information for families where a parent experiences depression or anxiety (DVD) Development and pilot testing of web- based training (‘Family Focus’) for primary mental health professionals working with families where a parent experiences depression or anxiety
    • 16. More information for parents
    • 17. Information for fathers
    • 18. Information Sheets
    • 19. Mouse mat Wallet cards
    • 20. Child Quote “When dad wasn’t well, it would’ve been most beneficial for our family if he’d been able to stay connected to us, not just be taken away and not have any contact.”
    • 21. Helping to embed good practice Regular meetings with Mental Health Department nominees from states and territories Work with non-government mental health bodies Collaborations with others working in the education field and/or child and family mental health area (e.g. KidsMatter, National Perinatal Depression Initiative)
    • 22. Supporting systems change Medical Journal of Australia supplement Advocating for changes to government funded programs to better support families where a parent experiences mental illness.
    • 23. FaHCSIA funding 2012 (Child Aware) Development and pilot testing of an ‘advanced’ module of ‘Keeping Families and Children in Mind’ designed specifically for supervisors in adult services (e.g. Drug and alcohol, housing, domestic violence, mental health). In conjunction with NCETA (National Centre for Education and Training in Addictions) and ACCP (Australian Centre for Child Protection).
    • 24. 2012-2014 ... Promoting  Family Focus DVD for families where a parent experiences depression and/or anxiety  Intervention – brief (6 session) intervention for family members including school aged children  E-learning – for primary mental health care workers
    • 25. Current focus... E-learning for primary mental health care workers, so they are prepared for the launch of the DVDs in January 2013
    • 26. 2012-2014 funding phase Developing additionaladvanced module for‘Keeping Families andChildren in Mind’ Develop and pilot test an e-learningresource (and associated materials) for„Let‟s Talk ... about the children‟ – basedon evidence from Finland of thisapproach used by secondary and tertiarymental health practitioners.
    • 27. 2012-2014 funding phase •Develop and promote information pathways within rural areas. •Develop and pilot test ‘pathways of care’ resources which enable those working with families where a parent is identified as having a mental illness and children in the 0-5 year range to respond to child and family needs and/or refer on as appropriate.
    • 28. 2012-2014 funding phase  Continue provision of expert advice.  Explore development of web-based resources that could assist mental health care organisations in collaborative work with their local health, welfare and early childhood services.
    • 29. 2012-2014 funding phase Continue to build and promote the evidence base, especially as it relates to user-driven services for children and families where a parent experiences mental illness. Maintain connections with our international consultation group. Continue strong involvement of people with lived experience.
    • 30. Who employs COPMI staff? Australian Infant Child Adolescent and Family Mental Health Association Ltd
    • 31. What is AICAFMHA’s aim? To actively promote the mental health and well being of infants, children, adolescents and their families and/or carers in Australia.
    • 32. What are AICAFMHA’s values? Collaborative partnership is the keynote, between all professional groups working in the mental health field with the young and their families and with relevant community groups, carers and consumers of mental health services from a fully representative range of geographic, cultural, social and economic backgrounds.
    • 33. What are AICAFMHA’s values? The full range of mental health issues affecting the young and their families or carers are considered from individual development, family life cycle and community perspectives.
    • 34. What are AICAFMHA’s values? Partnerships in advocacy in the public arena for effective promotion, prevention, early intervention, treatment and follow- up programs in child and adolescent mental health and that these are pursued in a context of human rights principles.
    • 35. What are AICAFMHA’s values? A broad approach to infant, child, adolescent and family mental health provides the basis for wide dissemination of scientific knowledge in this area and for encouraging the development of relevant qualitative and quantitative studies of the highest research standard.
    • 36. What are AICAFMHA’s values? Collaboration and consultation is valued with other national, international, state-based and local organisations that promote enhancement of mental health, focussing upon the needs of the young and their families.
    • 37. What are AICAFMHA’s values? A range of consultative processes with young people, families and carers is valued, processes which are inclusive and appropriate to the age level of the young people involved.
    • 38. What are AICAFMHA’s values? It is appreciated that there are approaches to working with infants, children, adolescents and their families, which are fundamentally and distinctly different from those relevant to adult mental health service provision.
    • 39. contacts 77 King William Street North Adelaide SA 5006 copmi@copmi.net.auwww.copmi.net.au +61 [8] 8367 0888
    • 40. Thank you ... Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing

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