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Requirements Gathering for Project Management Success

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Ever wonder why your project isn't going as smoothly as it could be? Do you know the 5 key components of a successful requirements gathering process? This presentation will help ensure your project …

Ever wonder why your project isn't going as smoothly as it could be? Do you know the 5 key components of a successful requirements gathering process? This presentation will help ensure your project gets started on the right foot.

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  • 1. www.wgconsulting.com Requirements Gathering: The first step to project success
  • 2. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 24/7/2014  70% of organizations have suffered at least one project failure in the prior 12 months.  50% of respondents also indicated that their project failed to consistently achieve what they set out to achieve!  Many organizations fail to measure benefits so they are unaware of their true status in terms of benefits realization. Source: KPMG Study, Global IT Management Survey Dec 2010 The Facts
  • 3. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 34/7/2014  Interviews with 600 people closely involved in software development projects finds that even at the start of a project many people expect their projects to fail!  “Fuzzy business objectives, out-of-sync stakeholders, and excessive rework” mean that 75% of project participants lack confidence that their projects will succeed.  78% of respondents reported that the “Business is usually or always out of sync with project requirements” What are the statistics?
  • 4. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 44/7/2014  Too many project managers either overlook the importance of requirements management or fail to understand the difference between scope, requirements, and expectations.  In fact, 60-80 percent of project failures can be attributed directly to poor requirements gathering, analysis, and management (Meta Group, now a part of Gartner). G. Chandrashekar of the ProjectSmart blog wrote, “Innumerable studies have shown that requirements gathering is the single most important step…It’s far more expensive to fix a requirements error than a coding error. But somehow everyone seems to believe that a requirements specification document is the easiest part to produce…It can’t be further from the truth. No one ever built a good structure without the right foundation. Make sure that you take time to gather the requirements fully and analyze them in depth.” What is the problem?
  • 5. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 54/7/2014 Why Projects Fail….
  • 6. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 64/7/2014  The requirements gathering or the discovery phase is essential to the success of any project.  Many experienced project managers would agree that if the requirements are identified correctly and early in the project cycle there would be a significant reduction in the project budget.  If an effort to save time and project dollars, requirements gathering is often overlooked or is not allocated enough time or budget. Why are requirements important?
  • 7. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 74/7/2014 Five key components of requirements gathering 1. Gathering requirements comes first, defining scope comes second. It is fairly common in the project management world for people to use the terms “requirements” and “scope” synonymously. But they are different. “Requirements” define what is needed and “Scope” is how you are going get there.  “Requirements” are the demands, needs, and specifications for a product as outlined by project stakeholders. The Deep Fried Brain Blog defines requirements as what the customer needs.  “Scope” is defined as the work that needs to be accomplished to deliver a product, service, or result with the specified features and functions.
  • 8. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 84/7/2014 Five key components of requirements gathering 2. There are two types of requirements: project requirements and product requirements. Project Requirements define how the work will be managed. Project requirements focus on who, when, where, and how something gets done. Product Requirements include high level features or capabilities that the business team has committed to delivering to a customer. Project requirements must be defined first and then products evaluated based on the best fit to these needs.
  • 9. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 94/7/2014 Five key components of requirements gathering 3. Make sure you adequately document all the requirements. The requirements gathering process should be iterative and all discussions documented and verified to make sure requirements were understood correctly. Requirements should be evaluated throughout the project to make sure systems are not overly complicated, over designed and address the initial needs defined at the beginning of the project.
  • 10. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 104/7/2014 Five key components of requirements gathering 4. Select the best methodology for the project. The approach when developing a project must be determined for each engagement based on the project team, the organization and the goals of the project. In some cases, a hybrid of these methodologies is ideal. A few examples of project methodology include: RAD (Rapid Application Deployment) Spiral • Used for less structured projects • Projects are divided to smaller initiatives • Prototyping is used Spiral • Incremental build • Additional functionality added later • Prototyping used Waterfall • Tightly defined objectives • Controlled process • Major milestones with accountability JAD (Joint Application Design) • Involves the client or end user in the design and development of an application • Collaborative workshops • Requires dedicated resources Scrum • Flexible and collaborative • General guidelines are set but constantly reevaluated • Inspect and reevaluate
  • 11. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 114/7/2014 Five key components of requirements gathering 5. Engage a diverse cross section of users It is always important to engage a broad group of users. Requirements gathering sessions are usually effective in involving groups of users. The facilitator of these discussions is critical providing leading questions, understand the business and be able to gather information effectively. It is often difficult for participants to articulate their daily routines and processes. The success of requirements gathering is contingent on the ability to extract detailed and high level information and then create a global picture of the needs of the organization.
  • 12. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 124/7/2014 Requirements: The first critical step “A good beginning makes a good ending.”  The requirements gathering process may not guarantee a successful project but provides a foundation for project that can be managed to meet well defined objectives.  Requirement gathering sessions should be designed to define business processes, owners, and reporting needs.  Requirements sessions should set a proactive tone for the project. Many project teams get into the mindset of being reactive is addressing issues. A clear, concise requirements document will create the baseline to building scope, project plans, risk mitigation plans.  Requirements provide the stepping stone to deriving scope. There are times where at the end of the requirements phase, scope cannot be clearly defined. It is essential at this point that the project methodology is modified to perhaps include a proof of concept or prototyping phase.
  • 13. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 134/7/2014 Requirements: The first critical step  Our requirements sessions are designed to be interactive and not follow a script. This environment allows users to learn from the other subject manager experts in the sessions as well as create a baseline for strong communication.  These sessions should include how communication will be delivered, the project team and their roles on the project and tools that will be used to document such as an issues log, requirements matrix, or weekly status reports.  A clear set of defined goals and objectives, reviewed throughout the term of the project is a essential to manage expectations and avoid project pitfalls.
  • 14. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 144/7/2014 In general, one of the biggest problems that globally/nationally dispersed teams face in requirements gathering and systems analysis is communication.
  • 15. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 154/7/2014 Why are we different 1. We follow the research and study what works. Our professionals have researched the results of project success and project failure. The WG team utilizes world-class methodologies to deliver value-creating solutions based on each client’s unique operating needs. Our team’s thorough understanding of operational and regulatory risk is the key to competitive results that mitigate such risks for our valued clients. 2. We adapt our approach to your needs. Best business practices have their value, but these processes cannot be applied to all organizations. Project methodology and approach can only be determined based on an understanding of users, business processes, resources, knowledge of the software and the requirements of the project.
  • 16. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 164/7/2014 Why are we different 3. We have been there. Our team is comprised of professionals with at least 15 years of industry and consulting experience. Our consultants have been IT analysts, administrators, project managers, FP&A managers, and IT professionals that have broad industry experience. This experience provides you with an educated, agile team that can adapt to the project methodology, culture and needs of your organization. 4. Communication. Our consultants focus on constant and effective communication with the client in the form of documentation, weekly meetings, demonstrations and training sessions.
  • 17. Proprietary & Confidential Copyright 2014, WG Consulting, LLC 174/7/2014 Our consultants bring many years of relevant experience to our engagements. We provide proven methodologies and efficiently organized teams to match each client’s specific project needs. Criteria • Deep Project Management & Delivery Skills • Relevant Industry Experience • Well-versed in Industry Best Practices • Client Success is the Primary Focus Client Benefit • Experienced and Right-sized team • Efficient Project Delivery Methodology • Collaborative Client/Consultant Partnership • Plans Aligned with Key Strategic Objectives Consultant 7Consultant 6Consultant 5Consultant 4Consultant 3Consultant 2Consultant 1 What Sets Us Apart
  • 18. WG Consulting Headquarters: 1415 Louisiana, Suite 3450 Houston, TX 77002 Houston London Singapore www.wgconsulting.com WG Consulting, LLC @thewgcpromise WG Consulting Andy Roehr Managing Director aroehr@wgconsulting.com O: 832.581.4990 C: 512.656.4341 Wedge International Tower 1415 Louisiana, Suite 3450 Houston, TX 77002 Roger Liau Director rliau@wgconsulting.com O: 832.581.4990 C: 713.628-8682 Wedge International Tower 1415 Louisiana, Suite 3450 Houston, TX 77002 Joel Jarratt Managing Director jjarratt@wgconsulting.com O: 832.581.4990 C: 832.458.8184 Wedge International Tower 1415 Louisiana, Suite 3450 Houston, TX 77002 Michelle Welch Director mwelch@wgconsulting.com O: 832.581.4990 C: 281.896.2223 Wedge International Tower 1415 Louisiana, Suite 3450 Houston, TX 77002 Contact Information