We're Meeting...Now What?

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  • 1. We’re Meeting…Now What? A Look Inside a Learning Team Bill Ferriter Solution Tree Author Digital Learning Consultant PLC Associate Full-time Classroom Teacher. Session Website: http://digitallyspeaking.pbworks.com/Now-What
  • 2. Checking In: Working with the participants at your table, share what brings you to this particular session. What individual experiences or expertise do you bring to the conversation? What are you hoping to walk away having learned?
  • 3. Because of the inherent difficulty of working with others, and because most teachers are used to working independently, when professional learning teams are put together and members suddenly asked to work in cooperation— to make collaborative decisions about what will happen in their classrooms— many teachers experience considerable frustration. (Graham & Ferriter, 2010, p. 70)
  • 4. Activity: Carousel Brainstorming In the center of your table, you’ll find an index card with a number written on it. That number corresponds to one of the stories hanging on the outside walls of this meeting room. Please move with the other participants at your table to this story. Spend 5-7 minutes silently reading the story when you get there.
  • 5. Activity: Carousel Brainstorming After reading, work with your partners to answer the following questions: •Story One: From the evidence that you can gather in this story, what is this learning team doing well? What kinds of professional learning team behaviors have they mastered? What are they most likely to be ready to tackle next?
  • 6. Activity: Carousel Brainstorming After reading, work with your partners to answer the following questions: •Story Two: From the evidence that you can gather in this story, what is this particular learning team struggling with? What challenges might they face in the future? How do you know?
  • 7. Activity: Carousel Brainstorming After reading, work with your partners to answer the following questions: •Story Three: How would teachers in this stage of development likely feel towards professional learning communities?
  • 8. Activity: Carousel Brainstorming After reading, work with your partners to answer the following questions: Story Four: What kinds of skills does this team need to develop in order to take their work further? If you were in charge of supporting this learning team, what would your next steps be?
  • 9. Activity: Carousel Brainstorming After reading, work with your partners to answer the following questions: Story Five: Make a prediction about what will happen next to this particular learning team. Explain the factors that will cause your prediction to come true.
  • 10. Activity: Carousel Brainstorming After reading, work with your partners to answer the following questions: Story Six: Create a metaphor or a graphic image that represents the learning team in your narrative story OR that represents the kinds of support that this team needs to move forward together.
  • 11. Filling the Time "What are we supposed to do?" Rambling meetings High Frustration Simple and scattered activities.
  • 12. Filling the Time Set clear work expectations. Provide sample agendas to define team's work. Assign specific roles to members.
  • 13. Sharing Personal Practices Teamwork = Sharing Standardization of instruction. Less experienced colleagues benefit. Delegation of planning.
  • 14. Sharing Personal Practices Require consensus around curriculum and assessment. “Push beyond planning.” Require shared mini lessons. Structure efforts to use student learning data in planning.
  • 15. Common Assessments "What does mastery look like?" Emotional conversations about quality instruction and the importance of individual objectives. Pedagogical controversy.
  • 16. Common Assessments Training in conflict management. Moderate early conversations. Training in developing effective assessments. Library of sample assessments.
  • 17. Analyzing Student Learning Shift from teaching to learning. Teachers publicly face learning results. Teachers can be defensive and can grow competitive.
  • 18. Analyzing Student Learning Provide tools for data analysis. Repurpose positions/ Hire data experts. Separate person from practice. Model.
  • 19. Differentiating Follow Up Teachers respond instructionally to data. Teams take collective action rather than respond as individuals. Principals serve as collaborative partners.
  • 20. Differentiating Follow Up Demonstrate flexibility as teams identify and then pursue novel approaches. Identify relevant professional development opportunities. Redesign positions to focus additional human resources on struggling students.
  • 21. Reflecting on Instruction "What practices work with our students?" Learning connected to teaching. Deep reflection on instruction. Action research.
  • 22. Reflecting on Instruction Create opportunities for teachers to observe each other. Carefully monitoring every imitative. Celebrate and publicize findings of team studies.
  • 23. Task for School Leaders Consider three different professional learning teams in your building. Identify the stage of development that they are most likely in. What does each team do well? What mistakes do they make? How can you best support their development?
  • 24. Task for Classroom Teachers Consider your professional learning team. Identify the stage of development that you are most likely in. What does your team do well? What mistakes do YOU make? What support do YOU need to move forward?
  • 25. Bill Ferriter The Tempered Radical http://snipurl.com/temperedradical Twitter Username: @plugusin Delicious Username: plugmein Email: wferriter@hotmail.com Bill Ferriter has about a dozen titles—Solution Tree PLC author and Associate, ASCD Columnist, Senior Fellow, the Teacher Leaders Network—but he checks them all at the door each morning when he walks into his sixth grade classroom!