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ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
ID Theft
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  • 1. ID THEFT: Protect Yourself! Bill Taylor University of Wyoming Community Development Area Educator The University of Wyoming is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.
  • 2. ID theft
    • ID theft criminals use your personal information to apply for credit or government benefits
      • Your name
      • Your birth date
      • Your Social Security number
      • Your address
      • Your bank account or credit card numbers
    UW Community Development Education
  • 3. What can be done with a false ID?
    • Open credit cards, buy goods
    • Take out loans
    • Get cell phones
    • Open bank accounts
    • Seek employment
    • Open credit accounts
    • Pay bills
    UW Community Development Education
  • 4. It pays to prevent ID theft
    • Victims spend an average of 600 hours recovering from ID theft, often over a period of years.
    • It is estimated that every victim of ID theft spends $1,400 in out-of-pocket expenses to clear their names
    UW Community Development Education
  • 5. Have you ever been the victim of identity fraud?
    • Yes
    • No
    UW Community Development Education
  • 6. Credit card fraud
    • Keep an eye on your credit cards at all times
    • Unscrupulous employees might steal the information from your credit card and use it to make counterfeit cards
    • Shred all credit card statements, receipts and solicitations before throwing them away
    UW Community Development Education
  • 7. Dumpster diving
    • Crooks look in garbage cans and elsewhere for discarded credit card statements and receipts to obtain the card numbers
    • These papers can be used to steal your identity and set up credit in your name
    • Shred sensitive papers
    UW Community Development Education
  • 8. Phishing
    • A term used for emails that claim to be from your bank, a reputable business or a government agency
    • Criminals ask for personal information such as Social Security numbers or account numbers to steal funds and/or steal identities
    UW Community Development Education
  • 9. Nigerian letters
    • E-mails that ask recipients to provide their bank account number to help them share in a big pot of money
    • If you respond to these letters you will lose your money
    UW Community Development Education
  • 10. Are you already a victim?
    • Check your credit report
    • Look for
      • Accounts you don’t recognize
      • Inaccurate information
    UW Community Development Education
  • 11. Credit reports
    • Check your credit reports regularly.
    • Free credit reports can be obtained once a year from each of the 3 credit reporting agencies
    UW Community Development Education
  • 12. Have you obtained your credit report within the last year?
    • Yes
    • No
    UW Community Development Education
  • 13. Have you found a mistake in your credit report?
    • Yes
    • No
    UW Community Development Education
  • 14. Credit reporting agencies
    • Equifax, 800-525-6285, www.equifax.com
    • Experian, 888-397-3742, www.experian.com
    • TransUnion, 800-680-7289, www.transunion.com
    UW Community Development Education
  • 15. Free credit reports
    • Annual Credit Report
      • www.annualcreditreport.com
      • (877) 322-8228
      • Annual Credit Report, Request Service, PO Box 105281, Atlanta, GA 30348-5281
    UW Community Development Education
  • 16. Social Security number (SSN)
    • Memorize your Social Security number (SSN)
    • Don’t carry your Social Security card
    • Don’t print your SSN on your driver’s license or bank checks
    • Keep all papers listing your SSN hidden or locked away
    • Shred all documents with SSNs before you throw them away
    UW Community Development Education
  • 17. Financial information
    • Check bills, bank and credit card statements
      • Report any unauthorized transactions immediately
    • Track statements, new credit cards or check orders in the mail
    • Call the companies immediately if you notice
      • Unauthorized transactions
      • Missing credit cards or checks
    UW Community Development Education
  • 18. Cards and account numbers
    • Shield ATM keypads when entering passwords
    • Memorize your PINs
    • Watch your cards while they are with sales clerks or waiters
    • Lock your own mailbox
      • Use US post boxes for outgoing mail that contains account numbers
    UW Community Development Education
  • 19. Phone and Internet
    • Don’t answer callers or e-mails asking for personal information
      • Remember, you may be overheard on a cell phone
    • Always make sure you are dealing with reputable companies
    UW Community Development Education
  • 20. Marketing
    • Read your bank’s privacy notice
    • Stop or ‘opt out’ of pre-screened credit offers
      • (888) 5OPT-OUT
    UW Community Development Education
  • 21. Monitor your mail
    • Missed bills, credit card statements, etc. may signal trouble
    UW Community Development Education
  • 22. Always question …
    • Charges, bills or collection calls that are not yours
      • Complain immediately
    • Denials of credit when you have good credit
      • Get a free copy of the credit report used to make the decision
      • Check for mistakes or fraud
    UW Community Development Education
  • 23. Password accounts
    • Place passwords on your credit card, bank and phone accounts
    • Don’t use easy-to-guess names and numbers
    • Ask businesses not to use SSN or mother’s maiden name
    UW Community Development Education
  • 24. Warning signs of fraud
    • Be suspicious if you hear
      • You’ve won a prize or free gift
      • You’ve been selected to receive a special offer
      • You must act immediately or lose out
      • You must pay for shipping your prize or free gift
      • You must give your credit card number and expiration date to verify that you are a credit cardholder
    UW Community Development Education
  • 25. Warning signs of fraud (cont.)
      • You’re asked for personal information
      • You’re asked to donate to an agency whose name sounds like a well known charity
      • You’re one of only a chosen few to receive this offer
      • A courier will come to your home to get your payment
      • Little risk and large, short term profits
    UW Community Development Education
  • 26. Protect your assets
    • Never
      • reveal your financial information to someone who calls you on the phone
      • allow strangers to come into your home
      • believe that a stranger will use your money for a good purpose
      • assign power of attorney to people you don’t know very well
      • sign contracts that have any blank lines in them
    UW Community Development Education
  • 27. Protect your assets (cont.)
    • Financial exploitation is often committed by a person that is trusted by the victim
    • Keep all important financial documents under lock and key in your home
    • Store valuables in a bank safe deposit box
    UW Community Development Education
  • 28. What can you do?
    • Do not give your telephone calling card, credit card, or bank account numbers to strangers by telephone or mail unless you initiated the order for goods or services.
    • Do not be pressured by salespeople into buying NOW .
    • Do not pay to receive a free gift.
    • Shut the door. Hang up the phone.
    UW Community Development Education
  • 29. ID Protection Service
    • Consider subscribing
    • Amount of protections varies depending on company
    • Types of services
      • Request credit reports and request a fraud alert for each
      • Remove you from preapproved credit card offers
    UW Community Development Education
  • 30. ID Protection Service (cont.)
    • Types of services (cont.)
      • Check criminal databases for illegal activity attached to your name
      • Monitor any address changes attached to your name
      • Assist with lost or stolen wallet
      • Legal assistance
      • Liability insurance (for fraudulent charges and expenses to recover identity)
    UW Community Development Education
  • 31. ID theft clean up
    • Document the crime
    • File a police report with your local police department
      • Get a copy of the police report
    • Contact appropriate state and federal law enforcement agencies
    • Complete a free ID Theft Affidavit from the FTC
      • www.ftc.gov/idtheft
    UW Community Development Education
  • 32. Victims - be watchful
    • Dispute fraudulent accounts immediately
      • Close all affected accounts
      • Follow up your phone call with a written request
    • Get letters stating disputed accounts have been closed
    • Create new passwords for all of your accounts
      • Avoid easy-to-guess passwords
    UW Community Development Education
  • 33. Resources
    • Consumer Action
      • www.consumer-action.org
      • 415-777-9635
    • Identity Theft Resource Center
      • www.idtheftcenter.org
      • 858-693-7935
    • National Consumers League
      • www.nclnet.org/
      • 202-835-3323
    UW Community Development Education
  • 34. Resources (cont.)
    • National Fraud Information Center (part of National Consumers League)
      • www.fraud.org
    • Privacy Rights Clearinghouse
      • www.privacyrights.org/identity.htm
      • 619-298-5681
    • Wyoming Attorney General
      • attorneygeneral.state.wy.us
      • 307-777-7841
    • AARP
      • www.aarp.org/
      • 888-687-2277
    UW Community Development Education
  • 35. Resources (cont.)
    • Wyoming Adult Protective Services
      • dfsweb.state.wy.us/aps.htm
      • 307-777-3602
    • North American Securities Association
      • www.nasaa.org/home/index.cfm
      • 202-737-0900
    • National Association of Attorneys General
      • 202-326-6040
    UW Community Development Education
  • 36. Resources (cont.)
    • FTC ID Theft Clearinghouse / ID Theft Hotline
      • www.ftc.gov/bcp/edu/microsites/idtheft/
    • US Department of Justice
      • www.usdoj.gov/
      • 202-514-2000
    • Federal Bureau of Investigation
      • www.sfbi.gov/; denver.fbi.gov
      • 307-772-2380
    UW Community Development Education
  • 37. Resources (cont.)
    • Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
      • www.fdic.gov/consumers/theft/index.html
      • 877-275-3342
    • United States Postal Inspection Service
      • Postalinspectors.uspis.gov/
      • 800-372-8347
    • United States Secret Service
      • www.secretservice.gov/
      • 307-772-2380
    UW Community Development Education
  • 38. Questions? The University of Wyoming is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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