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What’s in the Dairy Group?
All fluid milk products
and many foods made
from milk that retain
their calcium
Additionally, d...
MyPlate recommends
3 daily servings
2 cups for 2-3 year olds
2 ½ cups for 4-8 year olds
A serving is

1 cup milk

3-4 cheese cubes,
1/3 cup shredded

About 75% of
the calcium in
the U.S. food
supply comes
from ...
or
½ cup = ½ cup milk
Frozen yogurt

Pudding made
with milk
Breakfast smoothie

Southwestern cheese and corn chowder

A powerhouse
of good taste
Fresh berry stuffed French toast
with...
Closing the Gap
Dairy foods provide 3 of the 4 shortfall
nutrients… calcium, potassium and
vitamin D.
Calcium requirements vary by age.
what’s your personal target?
At this age
1 to 3 years
4 to 8 years
9 to 18 years
19 to 5...
Bone Health
Osteoporosis
causes weak bones.
In this too-common
disease, bones
become fragile and
break easily.

Normal
Bon...
• After mid-30’s, bone
loss begins for men and
women. Women lose
bone mass faster after
menopause.
• Bones can weaken
earl...
Not just bones…dairy foods
• Provide health benefits
– improves bone mass

• Reduce the risk of
–
–
–
–
–

osteoporosis
ki...
DASH
Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension
A diet rich in low-fat milk, cheese and
yogurt, fruits and vegetables, and lo...
Protein in milk helps muscles
recover after exercise

A diet higher
in protein
can also
help you feel
fuller longer.
At less than .25 cents per glass, milk is
a nutritional bargain
Few foods deliver dairy’s powerhouse of nutrients in
such ...
Make Mine Chocolate
A nod to nutrient-dense fat-free chocolate milk

Flavored milk contributes only 3% of the
added sugar ...
Comparison of Consumption
to Recommendations

2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
Dairy Consumption Gap

NHANES 2007-2008, ages 2 years and older
Milk is the #1
source of
calcium, potassium, vitamin D
LOOK at the Nutrition Facts Panel
All milk contains
nearly the same
amount of
calcium & other
essential
nutrients.

10% or...
Add One More
• Americans are currently consuming
about two dairy servings per day on
average.

• MyPlate recommends increa...
Enjoy your daily dairy dose
• Use milk when
making soups

• Spoon yogurt on
fruit

• Add shredded
cheese to salad

• Dunk ...
Start Young
to Build Healthy Habits
What you do today
matters tomorrow.
Kids say “yum”
•
•
•
•

String cheese
Pizza
Pour a glass at
Flavored milk
meals
Yogurt
The American
smoothies
Academy of
P...
Lactose Intolerance
does not mean dairy intolerance

Drink milk with food.

Aged cheese such as Cheddar and Swiss are low
...
Moooo
Milk should
be stored
cold,
between
35˚and 40˚

The Latin word for
cow is bos – which
is why so many
cows are called...
Tools & Resources:
MyPlate.gov
Tools & Resources
www.NationalDairyCouncil.org
NUTRITION LIBRARY:
• Dairy Council Digest
• Facts Sheets
• Recipes
• Resear...
Milk, yogurt, or cheese, dairy
delivers on your plate

Switch to fat-free or low-fat.
Naturally Nutrient Rich

Few foods contain as much naturally occurring calcium and
essential nutrients as dairy.
A single ...
Putting Recommendations
into Action
• American Academy of Family
Physicians

aafp.org
• American Academy of Pediatrics

aa...
Dairy's role in my plate
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Dairy's role in my plate

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Learn how dairy fits into a health eating plan.

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  • We all know that what we eat matters - MyPlate offers a simple visual reminder to make healthy food choices when you choose your next meal. MyPlate can help prioritize food choices by reminding us to make half of our plate fruits and vegetables and shows us the other important food groups for a well-balanced meal: whole grains, lean proteins, and low fat dairy. MyPlate is a visual cue to help implement the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for all Americans.Head over to www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for information, tools, “how-to” materials about healthy eating. While you’re there, check out the interactive tools like the customizable Daily Food Plan or Food Tracker. We hope that MyPlate becomes your plate in the months and years ahead. Snap a photo of your next meal and share on Twitter using the hashtag #MyPlate. This presentation is based on the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.
  • The 2010 Dietary Guidelines recommend that Dairy Food consumption increase. “Increase intake of fat-free and low-fat milk products such as milk, yogurt, cheese or fortified soy beverages.”*Calcium-fortified foods and beverages may provide calcium, but may not provide the other nutrients found in dairy foods.
  • 20101 Dietary Guidelines for Americans:Recommended amounts are 3 cups per day of fat-free or low-fat milk products for adults and children and adolescents ages 9-18 years;2 ½ cups per day for children ages 4 to 8 years;2 cups for children ages 2 to 3 years.
  • These count as ½ cup or half of a dairy serving
  • Breakfast, lunch and dinner, 3 servings a day.
  • American’s shortfall nutrients are calcium, potassium, vitamin D and dietary fiber.The Dietary Guidelines recommends that we choose foods that provide more potassium, fiber, calcium and vitamin D, which are nutrients of concern in Americans diets. These foods include vegetables, fruits, whole grains and milk and milk products.
  • The hallmark of the DASH trial evaluated the effects to eating patterns on blood pressure. Researchers found a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and predominately low-fat dairy (including an average of 1 ounce of regular fat cheese each day), within the context of a reduced fat diet, lowered blood pressure to a greater extent that a diet rich if fruits and vegetables but void of dairy.
  • Diets high in protein have been shown to help people feel fuller longer, which may reduce the desire to snack or over-eat, leading to decreased caloric intake.Whey protein after exercise can help speed the rebuilding of muscle by increasing muscle synthesis.1 Tang JE, et al. ApplPhysiolNutrMetab. 2007; 32: 1132-38.2 Hulmi JJ, et al. NutrMetab. 2010; 7(1): 51.
  • Nutritious, delicious and a value. Few foods deliver dairy’s powerhouse of nutrients in such an affordable and appealing way. For example, a glass of milk averages only about 25 cents, but gives you 9 essential nutrients including protein, calcium, potassium and vitamin D.
  • Flavored milk contributes 3% of added sugars. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2003-2006), Ages 2-18 years.2010 US Dietary Guidelines states: “If sweetened milk productsare chosen (flavored milk…),the added sugars also countagainst your maximum limitfor “empty calories‟ (caloriesfrom solid fats and addedsugars). This chart shows the sources of added sugars in diets of the US population. It highlights the contribution of sodas and similar calorically-sweetened beverages as the major source of added sugars in the American diet. All milk contains a unique combination of nutrients important for growth and development. And flavored milk accounts for less than 3.5 percent of added sugar intake among children ages 6-12 and less than 2 percent of the added sugar intake among teens. NHANES (2003-2006), Ages 2-18 yrsStudies how that children who drink flavored milk drink more milk overall, have better quality diets , do not have higher intakes of added sugar or fat, and are just as likely to be at a healthy weight compared to kids who do not consume flavored milk.Environ study, JADA, 2008http://www.nationaldairycouncil.org/SiteCollectionDocuments/child_nutrition/health_kit/ENVIRON%20Study%20Summary.pdfSince 2006, US dairy processors and schools have cut flavored milk calories 12.7% over 4 years and more than 75% of flavored milk is under 150 calories
  • This chart shows how the average American diet compares to recommendations found in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines. Whole grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy products, seafood, and oils are consumed below recommended amounts. Nutrients of concern are fiber, potassium, calcium, and vitamin D. Note that the intake shown for vitamin D only includes food sources, not supplements or vitamin D manufactured in response to sun exposure.The excessive amounts consumed of solid fats and added sugars, refined grains, and sodium are clearly shown in comparison to recommended limits.
  • The chart clearly shows that the gaps between recommended servings and average daily consumption of dairy begin at a young age. Even at current intakes, dairy foods make significant nutrient contributions.This chart demonstrates average servings per day. The recommended intake (right side of chart) arrows correspond to serving recommendations for age.
  • Milk #1 source: Dairy Research Institute™, NHANES (2003-2006). Ages 2+ years. Data Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, National Health and Nutrition ExaminationSurvey.Spot nutrient rich foods at a glance.Using a nutrient bar graph card, hold a piece of paper level at the top of the calorie bar. Notice the number of color bars that are higher than the calorie bar. Nutrient bars above the calorie bar show that the food is rich in those nutrients in relation to calories.Nutrient-rich foods provide substantial amounts of vitamins, minerals and othernutrients with relatively few calories.Nutrient rich foods are:• Whole, fortified and fiber rich grain foods• Colorful vegetables and fruits• Fat free and low fat milk and milk products• Lean meats, poultry, fish, eggs, beans andnutsThe bar cards show why all 5 food groupsare important. Look for the colors of the barscommon to each food group to see whyfoods are grouped together. A variety ofnutrient rich foods from every group makesup a healthful and enjoyable diet.See the Difference cards are available from Western Dairy Association. www.WesternDairyAssociation.org
  • The 2010 Dietary Guidelines urges us to switch to low-fat or fat-free milk.
  • 85% of Americans are currently not meeting Dairy Groups recommendations and milk contains important nutrients such as calcium, vitamin D and protein that our bodies need every day.
  • It is especially important to establish the habit of drinking milk in young children, as those who consume milk at an early age are more likely to do so as adults.
  • A recent study indicates that the visible addition ofcheese to various middle school menu offerings mayhelp increase the consumption of fruits, vegetables andwhole grains compared with these items without cheese.Pairing foods with cheese potentially helps to increasetotal nutrient intake to improve diet quality.Donnelly JE, Sullivan DK, Smith BK, et al. The Effects of Visible Cheese on the Selection and Consumption of Food Groups to Encouragein Middle School Students. J Child NutrManag. 2010;34(1).
  • For individuals who are lactose-intolerant, low-lactose and lactose-free milk products are available. Those who do not consume milk or milk products should consume foods that provide the range of nutrients generally obtained from the milk group, including protein, calcium, potassium, magnesium, vitamin D, and vitamin A. Soy beverages fortified with calcium and vitamins A and D are considered part of the milk and milk products group becausethey are nutritionally similar to milk.
  • Transcript of "Dairy's role in my plate"

    1. 1. What’s in the Dairy Group? All fluid milk products and many foods made from milk that retain their calcium Additionally, dairy alternatives that provide a significant source of calcium. milk, yogurt, cheese, bu ttermilk, lactose-free milk, pudding, frozen yogurt, dairy desserts, fortified soy beverages* What’s not in the Dairy Group? Foods made from milk that have little to no calcium. cream cheese, cream, whippe d cream, butter, sour cream
    2. 2. MyPlate recommends 3 daily servings 2 cups for 2-3 year olds 2 ½ cups for 4-8 year olds
    3. 3. A serving is 1 cup milk 3-4 cheese cubes, 1/3 cup shredded About 75% of the calcium in the U.S. food supply comes from dairy foods 1 cup yogurt
    4. 4. or ½ cup = ½ cup milk Frozen yogurt Pudding made with milk
    5. 5. Breakfast smoothie Southwestern cheese and corn chowder A powerhouse of good taste Fresh berry stuffed French toast with vanilla yogurt sauce Mac & cheese casserole cups NationalDairyCouncil.org Sugar & spiced chai tea Mustard-crusted steak salad with Blue Cheese Cocoa berry yogurt tarts Grilled chicken Cheddar casserole with mushrooms
    6. 6. Closing the Gap Dairy foods provide 3 of the 4 shortfall nutrients… calcium, potassium and vitamin D.
    7. 7. Calcium requirements vary by age. what’s your personal target? At this age 1 to 3 years 4 to 8 years 9 to 18 years 19 to 50 years 51-70 males 51-70 females >70 You need this much calcium daily (mg) 700 1,000 Growth 1,300 spurt 1,000 1,000 1,200 1,200 Source: Institute of Medicine, 2010
    8. 8. Bone Health Osteoporosis causes weak bones. In this too-common disease, bones become fragile and break easily. Normal Bone Bone with Osteoporosis Source: The 2004 Surgeon General’s Report on Bone Health and Osteoporosis: What It Means to You at http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/bonehealth
    9. 9. • After mid-30’s, bone loss begins for men and women. Women lose bone mass faster after menopause. • Bones can weaken early in life without healthy eating and physical activity habits. Source: The 2004 Surgeon General’s Report on Bone Health and Osteoporosis: What It Means to You at http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/bonehealth
    10. 10. Not just bones…dairy foods • Provide health benefits – improves bone mass • Reduce the risk of – – – – – osteoporosis kidney stones pre-menstrual symptoms : high blood pressure Type 2 diabetes More than 81 million Americans have cardiovascular disease — did you know low-fat and fat-free dairy may help reduce risk?
    11. 11. DASH Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension A diet rich in low-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, fruits and vegetables, and low in fat and sodium substantially lowers blood pressure in people with or without high blood pressure as effectively as some medications. ~Appel, EJ et al., NEJM, 336(16), 1117-24, 1997; Sacks, RM et al., NEJM, 344 (1), 3-11. 2001.
    12. 12. Protein in milk helps muscles recover after exercise A diet higher in protein can also help you feel fuller longer.
    13. 13. At less than .25 cents per glass, milk is a nutritional bargain Few foods deliver dairy’s powerhouse of nutrients in such an affordable, appealing, readily available way.
    14. 14. Make Mine Chocolate A nod to nutrient-dense fat-free chocolate milk Flavored milk contributes only 3% of the added sugar in children’s diets
    15. 15. Comparison of Consumption to Recommendations 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans
    16. 16. Dairy Consumption Gap NHANES 2007-2008, ages 2 years and older
    17. 17. Milk is the #1 source of calcium, potassium, vitamin D
    18. 18. LOOK at the Nutrition Facts Panel All milk contains nearly the same amount of calcium & other essential nutrients. 10% or more is an excellent source 100% DV for calcium = 1,000 mg
    19. 19. Add One More • Americans are currently consuming about two dairy servings per day on average. • MyPlate recommends increasing intake of fat-free and low-fat milk and milk products, such as milk, yogurt, cheese, or fortified soy beverages.
    20. 20. Enjoy your daily dairy dose • Use milk when making soups • Spoon yogurt on fruit • Add shredded cheese to salad • Dunk veggies in yogurt dip • Blend yogurt and • Enjoy a steaming fruit latte
    21. 21. Start Young to Build Healthy Habits What you do today matters tomorrow.
    22. 22. Kids say “yum” • • • • String cheese Pizza Pour a glass at Flavored milk meals Yogurt The American smoothies Academy of Pediatrics • Pudding urges kids to • Quesadillas choose milk, yogurt and cheese for the calcium they need. • Hot chocolate • Cereal and milk • Broccoli with cheese • Yogurt parfaits – Yogurt, fruit, ce real
    23. 23. Lactose Intolerance does not mean dairy intolerance Drink milk with food. Aged cheese such as Cheddar and Swiss are low in lactose. Introduce dairy slowly. Gradually increase the amount. Reduce it. Enjoy lactose-free milk and milk products. Yogurt with active cultures helps digest lactose. Maximize nutrition and minimize symptoms
    24. 24. Moooo Milk should be stored cold, between 35˚and 40˚ The Latin word for cow is bos – which is why so many cows are called “Bossy.” Milk undergoes numerous safety, quality and sanitation checks, making it among the most highly regulated and safest foods.
    25. 25. Tools & Resources: MyPlate.gov
    26. 26. Tools & Resources www.NationalDairyCouncil.org NUTRITION LIBRARY: • Dairy Council Digest • Facts Sheets • Recipes • Research Reviews • Patient Education Materials • Dairy Report blog
    27. 27. Milk, yogurt, or cheese, dairy delivers on your plate Switch to fat-free or low-fat.
    28. 28. Naturally Nutrient Rich Few foods contain as much naturally occurring calcium and essential nutrients as dairy. A single glass of milk delivers 9 essential nutrients for good health…calcium, potassium, phosphorus, protein, vitamins A, D, and B12, riboflavin and niacin (niacin equivalents).
    29. 29. Putting Recommendations into Action • American Academy of Family Physicians aafp.org • American Academy of Pediatrics aap.org • MyPlate ChooseMyPlate.gov • National Medical Association nmanet.org • National Osteoporosis • Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Foundation eatright.org • Milk Matters Campaign nichd.nih.gov/milk/milk.cfm nof.org

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