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Chap01

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It,s from Operation and supply Management 12 th edition by RICHARD,RAVI

It,s from Operation and supply Management 12 th edition by RICHARD,RAVI

Published in: Business, Technology

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  • Transcript

    • 1. McGraw-Hill/Irwin Copyright © 2009 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
    • 2. Chapter 1 Introduction to the Field
    • 3.
      • What is Operations and Supply Management?
      • Why Study Operations Management?
      • Transformation Processes Defined
      • Differences between Services and Goods
      • The Importance of Operations Management
      • Historical Development of OM
      • Current Issues in OM
      OBJECTIVES 1-
    • 4. What is Operations and Supply Management?
      • Operations and Supply Management (OM) is defined as the design, operation, and improvement of the systems that create and deliver the firm’s primary products and services
      1-
    • 5. Why Study Operations Management? Business Education Systematic Approach to Org. Processes Career Opportunities Cross-Functional Applications Operations Management 1-
    • 6. What is a Transformation Process? Defined
      • A transformation process is defined as a user of resources to transform inputs into some desired outputs
      1-
    • 7. Transformations
      • Physical--manufacturing
      • Locational--transportation
      • Exchange--retailing
      • Storage--warehousing
      • Physiological--health care
      • Informational--telecommunications
      1-
    • 8. Operations and Supply Management Supply Chain Processes Sourcing Processes Manufacturing Processes Service Processes Distribution Processes Logistics Processes Logistics Processes 1-
    • 9. What is a Service and What is a Good?
      • “ If you drop it on your foot, it won’t hurt you.” (Good or service?)
      • “ Services never include goods and goods never include services.” (True or false?)
      1-
    • 10. The Goods-Services Continuum 1-
    • 11. Historical Development of OM
      • JIT and TQC
      • Manufacturing Strategy Paradigm
      • Service Quality and Productivity
      • Total Quality Management and Quality Certification
      1-
    • 12. Historical Development of OM (cont’d)
      • Business Process Reengineering
      • Six-Sigma Quality
      • Supply Chain Management
      • Electronic Commerce
      • Service Science
      1-
    • 13. Current Issues in OM
      • Coordinate the relationships between mutually supportive but separate organizations.
      • Optimizing global supplier, production, and distribution networks.
      • Increased co-production of goods and services
      1-
    • 14. Current Issues in OM (cont’d)
      • Managing the customers experience during the service encounter
      • Raising the awareness of operations as a significant competitive weapon
      1-
    • 15. Question Bowl
      • A major objective of this book is to show how smart managers can do which of the following?
      • Improve efficiency by lowering costs
      • Improve effectiveness by creating value
      • Increasing value by reducing prices
      • Serving customers well
      • All of the above
      Answer: e. All of the above 1-
    • 16. Question Bowl
      • In the Input-Transformation-Output Relationship, a typical “input” for a Department Store is which of the following?
      • Displays
      • Stocks of goods
      • Sales clerks
      • All of the above
      • None of the above
      Answer: e. None of the above (The above are considered “Resources” of a department store. The correct answer is “Shoppers”.) 1-
    • 17. Question Bowl
      • In which of the following decades did the concept of quality control originate?
      • 1920’s
      • 1930’s
      • 1940’s
      • 1950’s
      • 1970’s
      Answer: b. 1930’s (Tools such as sampling inspection and statistical tables where first developed by Walter Shewhart, H. F. Dodge, and H. G. Romig.) 1-
    • 18. End of Chapter 1 1-