Executive Powers:  Part 1  Chapter 14: section 1 and 2
 
Topics <ul><li>Diplomatic and Military Power </li></ul><ul><li>Legislative Power </li></ul><ul><li>Judicial Power </li></ul>
I. Diplomatic and Military Power <ul><li>Treaties and Executive Agreements </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition </li></ul><ul><li...
A. Treaties and Executive Agreements <ul><li>The President can make treaties with two-thirds approval of the Senate. </li>...
B. Recognition <ul><li>Another diplomatic power of the President is the power of  recognition .   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To...
<ul><li>Alexander Hamilton wrote: </li></ul><ul><li>“ the direction of war most peculiarly demands those qualities which d...
C. War Powers <ul><li>The President is the Commander in Chief, commander of the Armed Services. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pres...
D. War Powers Resolution  of 1973 <ul><li>3 provisions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>President must report to congress of any mili...
II. Legislative Power <ul><li>State of The Union Address </li></ul><ul><li>Veto power </li></ul>
A. State of the Union Address <ul><li>Each year the President stands before congress to deliver this address. </li></ul><u...
B. Veto Power <ul><li>The president has the power to  veto  legislation made by congress. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can also  ...
V. Judicial Power <ul><li>The Appointments </li></ul><ul><li>Pardons  </li></ul><ul><li>Amnesty </li></ul><ul><li>Other po...
A. The Appointments <ul><li>The Power to appoint Supreme Court Judges. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be confirmed by the Sena...
B. Pardons <ul><li>A  pardon  is a legal forgiveness for a crime </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can only be used in federal cases <...
C. Amnesty <ul><li>A special pardon given to a group of people. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1977 Carter granted Amnesty to those...
D. Other powers <ul><li>reprieve  is the postponement of the execution of a sentence. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Still guilty <...
What we know <ul><li>What are the diplomatic and military powers of the executive? </li></ul><ul><li>How is there a confli...
Terms <ul><li>Executive agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Treaty </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition </li></ul><ul><li>War Powers Reso...
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Executive Powers Ch 14 Part 2

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Executive Powers Ch 14 Part 2

  1. 1. Executive Powers: Part 1 Chapter 14: section 1 and 2
  2. 3. Topics <ul><li>Diplomatic and Military Power </li></ul><ul><li>Legislative Power </li></ul><ul><li>Judicial Power </li></ul>
  3. 4. I. Diplomatic and Military Power <ul><li>Treaties and Executive Agreements </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition </li></ul><ul><li>War Powers </li></ul><ul><li>War Powers Act of 1973 </li></ul>
  4. 5. A. Treaties and Executive Agreements <ul><li>The President can make treaties with two-thirds approval of the Senate. </li></ul><ul><li>The President can by-pass senate approval with executive agreement . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These agreements have the same legal status as treaties. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They do not require the approval of the senate </li></ul></ul>
  5. 6. B. Recognition <ul><li>Another diplomatic power of the President is the power of recognition . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To recognize a foreign government as legitimate. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recognition is given or withheld from foreign governments as a method of approving or disapproving that nations actions. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>China and Cuba. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hamas??? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Tibet and Taiwan??? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 7. <ul><li>Alexander Hamilton wrote: </li></ul><ul><li>“ the direction of war most peculiarly demands those qualities which distinguished the exercise of power by a single hand”. </li></ul><ul><li> Federalist 74 </li></ul>
  7. 8. C. War Powers <ul><li>The President is the Commander in Chief, commander of the Armed Services. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>President has sent troops into combat without Congressional approval. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Barbary Coast Pirates under Jefferson </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>James Polk and the Nueces River valley </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Korean War and Vietnam War </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Military strikes against Libya, Afghanistan, Sudan, Bosnia, Granada, Panama, and on </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Congress has power to declare war. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Has passed joint resolutions 8 times in support of military action. </li></ul></ul>
  8. 9. D. War Powers Resolution of 1973 <ul><li>3 provisions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>President must report to congress of any military action within 48 hours. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Troop involvement is limited to 60 days. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Congress can approve for longer involvement. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Congress may pass a concurrent resolution to end combat operations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Many oppose the WPR as unconstitutional. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Restricts the power of the executive. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 10. II. Legislative Power <ul><li>State of The Union Address </li></ul><ul><li>Veto power </li></ul>
  10. 11. A. State of the Union Address <ul><li>Each year the President stands before congress to deliver this address. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tells the State of the Union . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sets a national agenda </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attempts to influence Congress </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The President can also work closely with individual legislators to push a specific agenda. </li></ul>
  11. 12. B. Veto Power <ul><li>The president has the power to veto legislation made by congress. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can also pocket Veto </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Congress can override a presidential veto with a two-thirds vote. </li></ul><ul><li>Some want to give the President the power of Line Item Veto </li></ul>
  12. 13. V. Judicial Power <ul><li>The Appointments </li></ul><ul><li>Pardons </li></ul><ul><li>Amnesty </li></ul><ul><li>Other powers </li></ul>
  13. 14. A. The Appointments <ul><li>The Power to appoint Supreme Court Judges. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Must be confirmed by the Senate. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Has an incredible impact. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Judges serve the rest of their life. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Far reaching impact. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They interpret the constitution </li></ul></ul>
  14. 15. B. Pardons <ul><li>A pardon is a legal forgiveness for a crime </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can only be used in federal cases </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Usually granted after conviction, but not always </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Richard M. Nixon and Watergate </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Clinton and his brother. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  15. 16. C. Amnesty <ul><li>A special pardon given to a group of people. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1977 Carter granted Amnesty to those who avoided the draft during the Vietnam War. </li></ul></ul>
  16. 17. D. Other powers <ul><li>reprieve is the postponement of the execution of a sentence. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Still guilty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Penalty is postponed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A commutation reduces the sentence or the fine imposed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Still guilt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The penalty has been reduced </li></ul></ul>
  17. 18. What we know <ul><li>What are the diplomatic and military powers of the executive? </li></ul><ul><li>How is there a conflict between the executive and legislative branch over the issue of military powers? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the War Powers Resolution of 1973? </li></ul><ul><li>How can the President influence legislation? </li></ul><ul><li>How can the President influence the courts? </li></ul>
  18. 19. Terms <ul><li>Executive agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Treaty </li></ul><ul><li>Recognition </li></ul><ul><li>War Powers Resolution of 1973 </li></ul><ul><li>Line item veto </li></ul><ul><li>State of union address </li></ul><ul><li>Pardon </li></ul><ul><li>Amnesty </li></ul><ul><li>Reprieve </li></ul><ul><li>Clemency </li></ul>

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