Literary Terms/Vocabulary <ul><li>By: Angell Wescott  </li></ul>
Ominous <ul><li>Definition: threatening, giving the impression that something bad is going to happen </li></ul><ul><li>Exa...
Petulant <ul><li>Definition: Childishly, sulky, bad tempered </li></ul><ul><li>Example:  “And while you’re at it, Muse, si...
Sycophant <ul><li>Definition: a person who acts attentive to someone in order to gain an advantage </li></ul><ul><li>Examp...
Admonition <ul><li>Definition: mild, kind, earnest reproof </li></ul><ul><li>Example:  “Faiths … all faiths … are admoniti...
Paean <ul><li>Definition: song of praise or triumph </li></ul><ul><li>Example:  The Beasts of England song in  Animal Farm...
Appellation <ul><li>Definition: giving a name to a person or thing </li></ul><ul><li>Example:  “Under the appellation of R...
Apostrophe <ul><li>Definition: address to an imaginary or absent person or a personification </li></ul><ul><li>Example:  “...
Metonymy <ul><li>Definition:  A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is clo...
Synecdoche <ul><li>Definition:  A figure of speech in which a part is made to represent the whole or the whole is made to ...
Euphemism <ul><li>Definition:  A mild or indirect word or expression for one too harsh or blunt when referring to somethin...
Epitaph <ul><li>Definition:  A phrase or statement written in memory of a person </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “Here lies Dob...
Wry <ul><li>Definition: using or expressing dry, mocking humor </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “As he followed Bill back to the...
Pious <ul><li>Definition: very religious </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “The slave auctioneer’s bell and the church-going bell...
Sumptuous <ul><li>Definition: luxurious, expensive-looking, gorgeous </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “How're we getting to King...
Garish <ul><li>Definition: bright and showy </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “When he shall die,  Take him and cut him out in li...
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Literary terms

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Literary terms

  1. 1. Literary Terms/Vocabulary <ul><li>By: Angell Wescott </li></ul>
  2. 2. Ominous <ul><li>Definition: threatening, giving the impression that something bad is going to happen </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “Sometimes a light glimmered out of the physician's eyes, burning blue and ominous , like the reflection of a furnace, or, let us say, like one of those gleams of ghastly fire that darted from Bunyan's awful doorway in the hill-side, and quivered on the pilgrim's face.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter . Boston: Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1850. Print. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Petulant <ul><li>Definition: Childishly, sulky, bad tempered </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “And while you’re at it, Muse, sing of the rage of the gods themselves, so petulant and so powerful here on their new Olympos, and of the rage of the post-humans, dead and gone though they might be, and of the rage of those few true humans left, self-absorbed and useless though they have become.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Simmons, Dan. Ilium . New York: HarperCollinsPublishers, 2003. Print. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Sycophant <ul><li>Definition: a person who acts attentive to someone in order to gain an advantage </li></ul><ul><li>Example: An example of a sycophant in Animal Farm is Squealer when he provides much information to convince the animals to believe that they are not starving. </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Orwell, George. Animal Farm . Harcourt Brace and Company, 1946. Print. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Admonition <ul><li>Definition: mild, kind, earnest reproof </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “Faiths … all faiths … are admonitions that there is something we cannot understand, something to which we are accountable.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Brown, Dan . Angels and Demons . New York: Pocket Books, 2000. Print. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Paean <ul><li>Definition: song of praise or triumph </li></ul><ul><li>Example: The Beasts of England song in Animal Farm is an example of a paean. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Beasts of England! Beasts of Ireland! </li></ul><ul><li>Beasts of land and seas and skies! </li></ul><ul><li>Hear the hoofbeats of tomorrow! </li></ul><ul><li>See the golden future rise!” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Orwell, George. Animal Farm . Harcourt Brace and Company, 1946. Print. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Appellation <ul><li>Definition: giving a name to a person or thing </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “Under the appellation of Roger Chillingworth, the reader will remember, was hidden another name, which its former wearer had resolved should never more be spoken.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Hawthorne, Nathaniel. The Scarlet Letter . Boston: Ticknor, Reed, and Fields, 1850. Print. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Apostrophe <ul><li>Definition: address to an imaginary or absent person or a personification </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “Excellent friend! How sincerely did you love me, and endeavor to elevate my mind, until it was on a level with your own.” (Frankenstein about his friend Henry who is not present at the time) </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein . Columbus, OH: Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, 2000. Print. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Metonymy <ul><li>Definition: A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is substituted for another with which it is closely associated </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “Disdaining fortune, with his brandished steel, which smoked with bloody execution” (Steel refers to his sword) </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. New York: Washington Press, 1992. Print. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Synecdoche <ul><li>Definition: A figure of speech in which a part is made to represent the whole or the whole is made to represent a part </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “Take thy face hence.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Shakespeare, William. Macbeth. New York: Washington Press, 1992. Print. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Euphemism <ul><li>Definition: A mild or indirect word or expression for one too harsh or blunt when referring to something unpleasant or embarrassing </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “What in the sam hill are you doing?” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Lee, Harper. To Kill A Mockingbird . New York City: J.B. Lippincott, 1960. Print. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Epitaph <ul><li>Definition: A phrase or statement written in memory of a person </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “Here lies Dobby, a free elf.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows . Scotland: Scholastic Inc., 2007. Print. </li></ul>
  13. 13. Wry <ul><li>Definition: using or expressing dry, mocking humor </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “As he followed Bill back to the others a wry though came to him, born no doubt of the wine he had drunk.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Rowling, J.K. Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows . Scotland: Scholastic Inc., 2007. Print. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Pious <ul><li>Definition: very religious </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “The slave auctioneer’s bell and the church-going bell chime in with each other, and the bitter cries of the heart-broken slave are drowned in the religious shouts of his pious master.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Douglass, Frederick. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass . Massachusetts: Dover Publications, 1845. Print. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Sumptuous <ul><li>Definition: luxurious, expensive-looking, gorgeous </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “How're we getting to King's Cross tomorrow, Dad?&quot; asked Fred as they dug into a sumptuous pudding.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Rowling, J.k. . Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban . New York City: Scholastic Inc., 1999. Print. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Garish <ul><li>Definition: bright and showy </li></ul><ul><li>Example: “When he shall die, Take him and cut him out in little stars, And he will make the face of heaven so fine That all the world will be in love with night And pay no worship to the garish sun.” </li></ul><ul><li>Citation: Shakespeare, William. Romeo and Juliet. New York: Dover Publications, 1993. Print. </li></ul>

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