Burrell Site
Pennsylvania
HEW VDIUC
Long-Term Stewardship Site Highlights
Burrell Site (page 3)
Major Activities- disposal...
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Burrell Site ............................................................................
National Defense Authorization Act (NOAA) Long-Term Stewardship Report
Pennsylvania 2
Burrell Site
BURRELL SITE
1.0 SITE SUMMARY
1.1 Site Description and Mission
The Burrell Site is the location of a disposal...
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Term Stewanlship Report
~ To Piltsburgh (-40 miles)
Burrell Site
2.0 SITE-W...
Burrell Site
2.2 Specific Long-Term Stewardship Activities
Engineered Units
The contaminated materials are covered with a ...
National Defense Authorization Act (NOAA) Long-Tenn Stewardship Report
DOE assumes that the disposal cell cap will not nee...
Canonsburg Site
CANONSBURG SITE
1.0 SITE SUMMARY
1.1 Site Description and Mission
The Canonsburg Site is the location of a...
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Tenn Stewardship Report
disposal cell that was completed in July 1985.
To P...
Canonsburg Site
Site records are kept in permanent storage at the DOE Grand Junction Office in Colorado. The types of reco...
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Term Ste" anlship Repm·t
Long-term stewardship activities of the Canonsburg...
For more information about the Canonsburg Site, please contact:
Art Kleinrath, Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Prog...
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
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Pennsylvania

  1. 1. Burrell Site Pennsylvania HEW VDIUC Long-Term Stewardship Site Highlights Burrell Site (page 3) Major Activities- disposal cell and groundwater monitoring; access restrictions Site Size- 28 hectares (69 acres) Start/End Years-1994/in perpetuity Estimated Average Annual Cost FY2000-2006- $51 ,600 Canonsburg Site (page 7) Major Activities- disposal cell monitoring; groundwater and surface water monitoring; access restrictions; inspections Site Size -14 hectares (34 acres) Start/End Years- 1996/in perpetuity Estimated Average Annual Cost FY2000-2006-$148,000 !:
  2. 2. Table of Contents Table of Contents Burrell Site ............................................................................ 3 Canonsburg Site ........................................................................ 7 Pennsylvania 1
  3. 3. National Defense Authorization Act (NOAA) Long-Term Stewardship Report Pennsylvania 2
  4. 4. Burrell Site BURRELL SITE 1.0 SITE SUMMARY 1.1 Site Description and Mission The Burrell Site is the location of a disposal cell for uranium mill tailings and other process-related wastes that were transported from the Canonsburg Mill, about 80 kilometers (50 miles) away. The site is located in Burrell Township in southwestern Pennsylvania. The site is one mile east of the Borough of Blairsville in Indiana County. The site, covering approximately 28 hectares (69 acres), is bordered on the south by the Conemaugh River and on the north by the Consolidated Rail Corporation railroad tracks. The disposal cell, located on the western part of the site, occupies about 1.5 hectares (4 acres) of the site. In the late 1950s, 11,600 tons of residual radioactive materials were shipped 31 kilometers (50 miles) from LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP HIGHLIGHTS Major Long-Term Stewardship Activities - disposal cell and groundwater monitoring; access restrictions Total Site Area- 28 hectares (69 acres) Estimated Volume ofResidual Contaminants- disposal cell55,800 cubic meters (73,000 cubic yards); groundwater unknown Long-Term Stewardship Start-End Years- 1994-in perpetuity Average Annual Long-Term Stewardship Cost FY 2000-2006 - $51,600 Landlord- U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office the uranium milling site in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, to the privately owned railroad property in Burrell Township (now known as the Burrell Site) for use as fill material under railroad tracks. In 1986, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) acquired the Burrell Site through condemnation proceedings and began consolidating the contaminated material into an onsite disposal cell. The Burrell Site was identified as a "vicinity property" to the Canonsburg processing site. Because of the large volume of waste and the distance to the Canonsburg site, the contaminated material was consolidated at the Burrell Site with the concurrence ofthe U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). DOE completed surface remediation of the uranium mill tailings and other contaminated surface radioactive material in 1987. Remediation is complete and DOE began long-term stewardship activities in 1994. The current mission of the site is long-term monitoring and maintenance of the disposal cell and monitoring of the groundwater. The site is subject to Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of1978 (UMTRCA). As such, DOE is responsible for any remediation and long-term stewardship activities. The Burrell Site did not have a historical DOE mission prior to being acquired for use as a disposal site in 1986. 1.2 Site Cleanup and Accomplishments Approximately 55,800 cubic meters (73,000 cubic yards) ofmill tailings and soils, weighing 86,000 dry tons and contaminated with four curies ofradium-226, were consolidated in the disposal cell. Remediation activities were completed at the site in July of 1987. The disposal cell was covered with a radon barrier and a rock erosion protection layer to meet the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standards for longevity, radon control, and groundwater protection. According to EPA standards, the cover must be designed to remain effective for 200 to 1,000 years. In 1994, the disposal cell was accepted under the NRC general license, and the DOE Grand Junction Office began long-term stewardship activities. Pennsylvania 3
  5. 5. National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Term Stewanlship Report ~ To Piltsburgh (-40 miles) Burrell Site 2.0 SITE-WIDE LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP 2.1 Long-Term Stewardship Activities 0 e Surface Water Monitoring Location @ Groundwater Monitoring Well O.Z5 0.5 The DOE Grand Junction Office is responsible for long-term stewardship activities at the Burrell Site and manages the site according to a long-term surveillance plan prepared specifically for the site. Site-wide long- term stewardship activities include maintaining and repairing the 1.8 meter (6 foot) high locked security fence that surrounds the entire site, controlling access to the disposal cell. Warning signs, displaying the international trefoil symbol for radioactive materials and indicating that trespassing is forbidden, are located at equal intervals along the security fence. DOE maintains and replaces these signs, as necessary. An inscribed granite marker is located on the site identifying the materials contained in the disposal cell. Drilling and otherintrusive activities are restricted across the entire property through the use of institutional controls. Site records are in permanent storage at the DOE Grand Junction Office in Colorado. The types of records maintained include site characterization data, remedial action design information, the site completion report, long-term monitoring plans, annual inspection reports, and current and historic monitoring data. A report is submitted annually to the NRC to summarize, describe, and evaluate all surveillance and maintenance actions, as required under Title 10 of the Code ofFederal Regulations, Part 40. Real property records for the site are maintained at the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office in New Mexico. Pennsylvania 4
  6. 6. Burrell Site 2.2 Specific Long-Term Stewardship Activities Engineered Units The contaminated materials are covered with a low-permeability layer of compacted clay, a bedding layer, and, finally, a protective rock cover. The clay layer prevents the escape of radon gas and the infiltration of precipitation. The free-draining bedding layer overlies the clay layer. Precipitation runs down the sloped cell top through the bedding layer and into surrounding rock drains. The cell design promotes runoff of precipitation to minimize leachate. The surrounding area was graded to promote drainage and was vegetated with native species to minimize erosion. The rock cover protects against erosion. The disposal cell at the Burrell Site is designed and constructed to last for 200 to 1,000 years. However, DOE will be responsible for conducting long-term stewardship activities in perpetuity. Long-term stewardship activities associated with the disposal cell include annual inspections to evaluate the condition of surface features, cutting grass and clearing vegetation, and performing additional maintenance, as necessary. Groundwater Groundwater near the disposal cell contains limited uranium contamination above background levels but below the maximum concentration limits. Because the STAKEHOLDER INVOLVEMENT Community interaction has been minimal since the remedial action was completed. Copies of the annual inspection report for Burrell Site and other sites are distributed to the local library and any stakeholder requesting one. The report is also published on the DOE Grand Junction Office website at www.doegjpo.com. uranium levels do not exceed the maximum concentration limits, no groundwater remediation is required. DOE monitors the groundwater at the site to ensure the disposal cell is isolating the encapsulated wastes from the local environment. Groundwater monitoring currently occurs on an annual basis. DOE will be submitting a proposal to NRC to amend the monitoring frequency to once every five years. 2.3 Regulatory Regime In 1994, the Burrell Site came under a general license issued by NRC for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials disposal sites (contained at Title 10 of the Code ofFederal Regulations, Section 40.27). The purpose of the general license is to ensure that such sites will be cared for in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment. The general license went into effect when NRC concurred that the site conformed to cleanup standards and formally accepted the site-specific long-term surveillance plan. Long-term stewardship activities of the Burrell Site are governed by several requirements in the following regulations: UMTRCA; the Atomic Energy Act of1954, as amended; EPA Groundwater Protection Standards; Title 40 of the Code ofFederal Regulations Part 192; and the National Environmental Policy Act of1969, as amended. 2.4 Assumptions and Uncertainties Because the Burrell Site has been monitored since 1994, the long-term stewardship activities at the site are well known and are not expected to change dramatically. Cost estimates reflect the current site agreements and monitoring frequencies. If DOE receives approval from NRC to reduce the groundwater monitoring frequency to five-year intervals, the cost for long-term stewardship activities will decrease accordingly. Pennsylvania 5
  7. 7. National Defense Authorization Act (NOAA) Long-Tenn Stewardship Report DOE assumes that the disposal cell cap will not need to be replaced for a minimum of 200 years and disposal cell monitoring will continue indefinitely. 3.0 ESTIMATED LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP COSTS Long-term stewardship costs for the Burrell Site are based on historical costs incurred while conducting actual surveillance and maintenance activities. Costs for fiscal years (FY) 2001 through 2006 include prorated costs associated with decommissioning unnecessary monitoring wells at similar sites. This represents a legacy cost inherited from DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) project. Contingency costs, such as cap replacement, are not reflected in the cost estimates. Site Long-Term Stewardship Costs (Constant Year 2000Dollars) Year(s) Amount Year(s) Amount Year(s) Amount FY 2000 $57,252 FY2008 $15,300 FY 2036-2040 $80,000 FY 2001 $55,400 FY 2009 $15,200 FY 2041-2045 $80,000 FY 2002 $58,700 FY 2010 $15,300 FY 2046-2050 $80,000 FY 2003 $52,300 FY 2011-2015 $73,000 FY 2051-2055 $80,000 FY2004 $59,000 FY 2016-2020 $72,900 FY 2056-2060 $80,000 FY 2005 $38,900 FY 2021-2025 $74,800 FY 2061-2065 $80,000 FY 2006 $39,600 FY 2026-2030 $79,200 FY 2066-2070 $80,000 FY 2007 $15,400 FY 2031-2035 $80,000 4.0 FUTURE USES No future use is expected other than the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the disposal cell. For more information about the Burrell Site, please contact: Art Kleinrath, Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503 Phone: 970-248-6037 or visit the Internet website at http://www.doegjpo.com Pennsylvania 6
  8. 8. Canonsburg Site CANONSBURG SITE 1.0 SITE SUMMARY 1.1 Site Description and Mission The Canonsburg Site is the location of a former radium and uranium processing mill that operated from 1911 to 1957. The site contains a disposal cell for the uranium mill tailings and other contaminated materials that resulted from milling operations. The site is located within the Borough of Canonsburg in southwestern Pennsylvania, approximately 32 kilometers (20 miles) southwest of downtown Pittsburgh. The 14-hectare (34-acre) site lies between Chartiers Creek and the Conrail railroad tracks. The area surrounding the Canonsburg Site is primarily residential and is moderately populated. The uranium milling operations at the site resulted in process-related waste and mill tailings. The site generated approximately 286,000 cubic meters (374,000 cubic yards) of contaminated material, some of which LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP HIGHLIGHTS Major Long-Term Stewardship Activities - disposal cell monitoring; groundwater and surface water monitoring; access restrictions; inspections Total Site Area- 14 hectares (34 acres) Estimated Volume ofResidual Contaminants- engineered units 147,000 cubic meters (192,000 cubic yards); groundwater 20,000 cubic meters (26,000 cubic yards) Long-Term Stewardship Start-End Years- 1996-in perpetuity Average Annual Long-Term Stewardship Cost FY 2000-2006 -$148,000 Landlord- U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office was shipped to the Burrell Site approximately 80 kilometers (50 miles) away. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) consolidated the remaining materials into a 2.4-hectare (6-acre) onsite disposal cell in 1985. The current mission of the Canonsburg Site is limited to long-term stewardship activities, including monitoring and maintenance of the onsite disposal cell and monitoring of the groundwater. The site is subject to Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA). As such, DOE is responsible for remediation and long-term stewardship activities. Remediation has been completed and DOE began long-term stewardship activities at the site in 1996. Historically, the mission of the Canonsburg Site was to provide uranium for the U.S. Government national defense program. Standard Chemical Company originally operated the Canonsburg Site as a radium extraction plant from 1911 to 1922. Later, Vitro Corporation ofAmerica acquired the property and processed ore to extract radium and uranium salts. From 1942 until 1957, Vitro was under contract with the Federal Government to recover uranium from ore and scrap. For the next nine years, the site was used only for storage under a U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) contract. In 1967, Canon Development Company purchased the property, and tenant companies leased it for light industrial use. 1.2 Site Cleanup and Accomplishments Initially, the uranium mill tailings were left on the Canonsburg Site in uncovered piles. Over time, the tailings were dispersed by wind and water erosion or were removed from the site for use as fill material in local and regional construction projects. Remediation of the Canonsburg Site included stabilization of approximately 147,000 cubic meters (192,000 cubic yards) of residual radioactive material remaining on the site and remediation of 163 vicinity properties. Contaminated soils at the site and in the surrounding vicinity properties were remediated to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards, as codified in Title 40 of the Code ofFederal Regulations, Part 192. DOE encapsulated the tailings and tailings-contaminated soils in an engineered Pennsylvania 7
  9. 9. National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Tenn Stewardship Report disposal cell that was completed in July 1985. To Pntsburgh, PA (-20miles) Canonsburg Site • Surface Water Monitoring Location @ GroundWater Monitoring wen 0.1 0.2 Miles Groundwater in the vicinity of the Canonsburg Site is contaminated with wastes generated during uranium ore processing. Approximately 20,000 cubic meters (26,000 cubic yards) of groundwater, covering approximately 60 hectares (78 acres), are contaminated. The major public water source for the Washington County area is surface water. There are no known uses of the groundwater in the vicinity of the disposal site. 2.0 SITE-WIDE LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP 2.1 Long-Term Stewardship Activities The DOE Grand Junction Office has been performing long-term stewardship activities at the Canonsburg Site since 1996. Access to the site is controlled by a two-meter (six-foot) high, locked perimeter fence. DOE performs fence repairs on an as-needed basis. A variety of signs, markers, and permanent monuments exist. Permanent boundary and survey monuments are placed along the site's southern boundaries. Metal signs displaying the international trefoil symbol for radioactive materials are attached to the outside of the fence and replaced, as necessary. No drilling or other intrusive activities are allowed on the property. Because ofthe site's proximity to Chartiers Creek, three sets of erosion control markers were installed along the northeast and southwest boundaries to measure movement of the creek. DOE and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers entered into an interagency agreement establishing that the Corps of Engineers will provide bank protection and erosion control measures if Chartiers Creek threatens the integrity of the Canonsburg Site. Pennsylvania 8
  10. 10. Canonsburg Site Site records are kept in permanent storage at the DOE Grand Junction Office in Colorado. The types of records maintained include the site characterization data, remedial action design information, the site completion report, long-term monitoring plans, annual inspection reports, and current and historic monitoring data. Real property records for the site are maintained at the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office in New Mexico. DOE develops and updates the records and reports required in the site-specific long-term surveillance plan for the Canonsburg Site. These reports are submitted annually to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to summarize, describe, and evaluate all surveillance and maintenance actions, as required under Title 10 of the Code ofFederal Regulations, Part 40. 2.2 Specific Long-Term Stewardship Activities Engineered Units The Canonsburg Site disposal cell contains approximately 226,000 dry tons, or 147,000 cubic meters (192,000 cubic yards), of mill tailings, with an estimated total activity of 100 curies of radium-226. The disposal cell has a compacted clay liner to protect the groundwater from contamination. The tailings were placed on top of the liner and covered with one meter STAKEHOWER INVOLVEMENT Community interaction has been minimal since the remedial action was completed. Copies of the annual inspection report for the Canonsburg Site are distributed to the local library and to any stakeholders requesting them. The report is also published on the DOE Grand Junction Office website at www.doegjpo.com. (three feet) of a clay-and-soil mixture to prevent the escape ofradon gas and the penetration ofprecipitation into the disposal cell. The radon barrier was covered with layers ofrock and soil and seeded with grass. The disposal cell design promotes rapid runoff of precipitation to minimize leachate. The long-term stewardship activities associated with the disposal cell include annual inspections to evaluate the condition of surface features, mowing and vegetation control, and periodic maintenance activities. The disposal cell was designed and constructed to last for 200 to 1,000 years in accordance with EPA standards. However, DOE's responsibility for the safety and integrity of the Canonsburg Site will continue in perpetuity. Groundwater DOE monitors groundwater and surface water at the site as a "best management practice" to evaluate potential contaminant trends within the unconsolidated materials that underlie the disposal site. Annual groundwater monitoring for uranium is expected to continue in perpetuity. Alternate concentration limits (ACLs), cleanup standards based on site-specific considerations, for uranium have been proposed to the NRC (the site regulator). For the alternate concentrations to be approved, evidence must be provided that ACLs will not adversely impact human health or the environment. The proposed limits are 1.0 milligrams per liter at the point ofcompliance and 0.1 milligrams per liter at the point of exposure. Groundwater monitoring is currently scheduled to continue annually for uranium in perpetuity and every third year for other constituents until 2023. Surface water monitoring will be conducted annually in perpetuity at three surface locations. 2.3 Regulatory Regime In 1996, the Canonsburg Site came under a general license issued by NRC for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive disposal sites (contained at Title 10 ofthe Code ofFederal Regulations, Section 40.27). The purpose ofthe general license is to ensure that such sites will be cared for in a manner that protects human health and safety and the environment. The general license went into effect when NRC concurred with DOE that the site conformed to cleanup standards and formally accepted the site's long-term surveillance plan. Pennsylvania 9
  11. 11. National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) Long-Term Ste" anlship Repm·t Long-term stewardship activities of the Canonsburg Site are governed by several requirements in the following regulations: UMTRCA; the Atomic Energy Act of1954, as amended; EPA Groundwater Protection Standards in Title 40 of the Code ofFederal Regulations Part 192; and the National Environmental Policy Act of1969, as amended. 2.4 Assumptions and Uncertainties Because DOE has performed long-term stewardship activities at the Canonsburg Site since 1996, long-term stewardship activities are well known and are not expected to change dramatically. DOE assumes that groundwatermonitoringfor uranium will continue annuallyin perpetuity, and that monitoring of other contaminants will be performed at three-year intervals unti12023. The disposal cap is not expected to be replaced for a minimum of 200 years. DOE expects to monitor the integrity of the disposal cap in perpetuity. 3.0 ESTIMATED LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP COSTS Long-term stewardship costs for the Canonsburg Site are based on historical costs incurred while conducting actual monitoring and maintenance activities. Costs expected for fiscal year (FY) 2000 are substantially larger than costs anticipated for later years because ofthe existence of a one-time expense for stream bank stabilization. FY 2001 through FY 2006 estimates include prorated costs associated with decommissioning unnecessary monitoring wells at similar sites. Remaining costs are associated with groundwater monitoring, institutional controls, and monitoring cell performance. Contingency costs, such as cap replacement, have not been included in the cost estimates. Site Long-Term Stewardship Costs (Constant Year 2000 Dollars) Year(s) Amount Year(s) Amount Year(s) Amount FY2000 $577,338 FY 2008 $22,900 FY 2036-2040 $123,300 FY 2001 $83,100 FY 2009 $25,800 FY 2041-2045 $123,200 FY 2002 $88,100 FY 2010 $22,900 FY 2046-2050 $123,300 FY 2003 $78,500 FY 2011-2015 $109,500 FY 2051-2055 $123,200 FY 2004 $88,500 FY 2016-2020 $112,200 FY 2056-2060 $123,300 FY 2005 $58,300 FY 2021-2025 $115,100 FY 2061-2065 $123,200 FY 2006 $62,200 FY 2026-2030 $122,000 FY 2066-2070 $123,300 FY 2007 $23,000 FY 2031-2035 $123,200 4.0 FUTURE USES In accordance with UMTRCA provisions, public access to the site will be restricted indefinitely. No future use is expected other than long-term monitoring and maintenance ofthe disposal cell. The site will be monitored and maintained in accordance with the long-term surveillance plan approved by the NRC. Pennsylvania 10
  12. 12. For more information about the Canonsburg Site, please contact: Art Kleinrath, Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503 Phone:970-248-6037 or visit the Internet website at http://www.doegjpo.com Pennsylvania Canonsburg Site 11

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