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WhereCampPDX 2009 Keynote
 

WhereCampPDX 2009 Keynote

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James talks about data interoperability and how GIS files can help or hinder sharing of information.

James talks about data interoperability and how GIS files can help or hinder sharing of information.

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  • \n
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  • ESRI can’t open may of the data sharing standards that are becoming prevalent on the GeoWeb such as SpatiaLite, Atom and KML.\n
  • Standards organizations\n“The ESRI Standard”\n
  • Standards organizations are based on consensus.\nThey are slow to adjust to changes in the marketplace.\nFollow don’t lead.\nGeoJSON, GeoRSS, KML, SpatiaLite are all examples\n
  • Shapefiles are interop friendly right? \n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • So you zip up the shapefile....\n
  • So you zip up the shapefile....\n
  • * .sbn and .sbx — a spatial index of the features\n * .fbn and .fbx — a spatial index of the features for shapefiles that are read-only\n * .ain and .aih — an attribute index of the active fields in a table or a theme's attribute table\n * .ixs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles\n * .mxs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles (ODB format)\n * .atx — an attribute index for the .dbf file in the form of shapefile.columnname.atx (ArcGIS 8 and later)\n * .shp.xml — metadata in XML format\n * .cpg — used to specify the code page (only for .dbf) for identifying the character encoding to be used\n\n
  • * .sbn and .sbx — a spatial index of the features\n * .fbn and .fbx — a spatial index of the features for shapefiles that are read-only\n * .ain and .aih — an attribute index of the active fields in a table or a theme's attribute table\n * .ixs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles\n * .mxs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles (ODB format)\n * .atx — an attribute index for the .dbf file in the form of shapefile.columnname.atx (ArcGIS 8 and later)\n * .shp.xml — metadata in XML format\n * .cpg — used to specify the code page (only for .dbf) for identifying the character encoding to be used\n\n
  • * .sbn and .sbx — a spatial index of the features\n * .fbn and .fbx — a spatial index of the features for shapefiles that are read-only\n * .ain and .aih — an attribute index of the active fields in a table or a theme's attribute table\n * .ixs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles\n * .mxs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles (ODB format)\n * .atx — an attribute index for the .dbf file in the form of shapefile.columnname.atx (ArcGIS 8 and later)\n * .shp.xml — metadata in XML format\n * .cpg — used to specify the code page (only for .dbf) for identifying the character encoding to be used\n\n
  • * .sbn and .sbx — a spatial index of the features\n * .fbn and .fbx — a spatial index of the features for shapefiles that are read-only\n * .ain and .aih — an attribute index of the active fields in a table or a theme's attribute table\n * .ixs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles\n * .mxs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles (ODB format)\n * .atx — an attribute index for the .dbf file in the form of shapefile.columnname.atx (ArcGIS 8 and later)\n * .shp.xml — metadata in XML format\n * .cpg — used to specify the code page (only for .dbf) for identifying the character encoding to be used\n\n
  • * .sbn and .sbx — a spatial index of the features\n * .fbn and .fbx — a spatial index of the features for shapefiles that are read-only\n * .ain and .aih — an attribute index of the active fields in a table or a theme's attribute table\n * .ixs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles\n * .mxs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles (ODB format)\n * .atx — an attribute index for the .dbf file in the form of shapefile.columnname.atx (ArcGIS 8 and later)\n * .shp.xml — metadata in XML format\n * .cpg — used to specify the code page (only for .dbf) for identifying the character encoding to be used\n\n
  • * .sbn and .sbx — a spatial index of the features\n * .fbn and .fbx — a spatial index of the features for shapefiles that are read-only\n * .ain and .aih — an attribute index of the active fields in a table or a theme's attribute table\n * .ixs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles\n * .mxs — a geocoding index for read-write shapefiles (ODB format)\n * .atx — an attribute index for the .dbf file in the form of shapefile.columnname.atx (ArcGIS 8 and later)\n * .shp.xml — metadata in XML format\n * .cpg — used to specify the code page (only for .dbf) for identifying the character encoding to be used\n\n
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  • Shapefiles are interop friendly right? \n
  • The elephant in the room\n
  • To access FGDB, you need ArcObjects\n
  • Which besides licensing, you need to work with this\n
  • We need an open spatial database\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • It is good enough for this guy\n
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  • PostGIS and SQL Server 2008 support OGC SF SQL as well\n
  • PostGIS and SQL Server 2008 support OGC SF SQL as well\n
  • PostGIS and SQL Server 2008 support OGC SF SQL as well\n
  • PostGIS and SQL Server 2008 support OGC SF SQL as well\n
  • Community needs to drive new GIS standards. \n\nGeoJSON, GeoRSS are perfect examples. ESRI supports them.\n
  • Community needs to drive new GIS standards. \n\nGeoJSON, GeoRSS are perfect examples. ESRI supports them.\n
  • \n
  • ESRI created their layer package just to solve this problem.\nZip file (like KMZ)\nFGDB + ESRI Layer Symbology\nESRI handler to automatically unzip and add to ArcMap\n\n
  • ESRI created their layer package just to solve this problem.\nZip file (like KMZ)\nFGDB + ESRI Layer Symbology\nESRI handler to automatically unzip and add to ArcMap\n\n
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  • Styled Layer Descriptor/Symbology Encoding\n
  • Styled Layer Descriptor/Symbology Encoding\n
  • Styled Layer Descriptor/Symbology Encoding\n
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  • All community driven standards. \nNo OGC\nProprietary GIS support\n
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  • There are three types of spatial data\n
  • There are three types of spatial data\n
  • There are three types of spatial data\n
  • How do you make sure that people can find your data when they need it most?\n
  • People will pay for quality data when it is easy to do so. \nSo much information is locked up behind doors because there is no way for people to monezite it.\nGive RSP Architects example of design studies\n
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  • The key takeaway from this is that the community will build maps on their own, even if you provide them. \nWhat you need to do is offer up your data in consumable formats such as GeoRSS, GeoJSON, KML, SpatiaLite so that the community can incorporate your data into these projects.\n
  • The key takeaway from this is that the community will build maps on their own, even if you provide them. \nWhat you need to do is offer up your data in consumable formats such as GeoRSS, GeoJSON, KML, SpatiaLite so that the community can incorporate your data into these projects.\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Downloading TIGER is a huge PITA\n
  • You can get down to the county, but sometimes that is too much data.\nSan Bernardino County in California is larger than Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Delaware combined.\nLA County would be a member of the G20. \n
  • You have to download each county at a time which takes a long time. \nYou have to download each county in each state!\n
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  • Truly open data formats allow users freedom of using the best software packages to get their work done.\n\n
  • I’m looking at you FGDB\n
  • We are seeing better data catalogs with generally open spatial data formats.\nThey are still tied back into the old ways of sharing (FTP, Whole File Downloads)\n
  • We are seeing better data catalogs with generally open spatial data formats.\nThey are still tied back into the old ways of sharing (FTP, Whole File Downloads)\n
  • We are seeing better data catalogs with generally open spatial data formats.\nThey are still tied back into the old ways of sharing (FTP, Whole File Downloads)\n
  • Archiving geo data is as important as sharing.\n
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  • American had fallen in love with Dharma and Greg\n
  • Needless to say the project was a critical success.\n
  • The project was stored in my personal data warehouse (a cd in the bottom of my drawer)\n
  • My old computer with VB5, FoxPro and MapObjects 1.2 has been recycled\n
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WhereCampPDX 2009 Keynote WhereCampPDX 2009 Keynote Presentation Transcript

  • Data Interoperability on the GeoWeb James Fee Evangelist
  • If Sharing is Easy... http://www.flickr.com/photos/13586721@N05/3122021735/
  • Why is it sohard to sharespatial data?
  • What about spatial data standards?
  • Community Driven Standards
  • Just give me a shapefile
  • portland.shpportland.shxportland.dbf
  • portland.shpportland.shxportland.dbfportland.prjportland.shp.xml
  • portland.cpg portland.shpportland.atx portland.sbx portland.shxportland.sbn portland.dbf portland.ainportland.aih portland.prj portland.mxsportland.ixs portland.shp.xml
  • portland.cpg portland.shpportland.atx portland.sbx portland.shxportland.sbn portland.dbf portland.ainportland.aih portland.prj portland.mxsportland.ixs portland.shp.xml
  • Can We Come Up With a Standard?
  • What would work?
  • What would work? open database
  • What would work? open database open symbology
  • What would work? open database open symbology OGC support
  • What would work? open database open symbology OGC supportplatform support
  • ESRI’s File Geodatabase
  • ESRI’s File Geodatabase
  • So just give me a FileGeodatabase
  • So we need an open spatial database format
  • I really wantto get me some of that!
  • ‣ All the benefits of Shapefiles ‣ Open ‣ Easy to use
  • ‣ All the benefits of Shapefiles ‣ Open ‣ Easy to use‣ None of the limitations ‣ Multiple files ‣ Limited field widths
  • Problems with SQLite?
  • Problems with SQLite?•No support from ESRI
  • Problems with SQLite?•No support from ESRI•Still not well known in the community
  • SpatiaLite
  • SpatiaLite•Built on SQLite RDBMS
  • SpatiaLite•Built on SQLite RDBMS•Just a file
  • SpatiaLite•Built on SQLite RDBMS•Just a file•Portable - Works on Windows, Linux or Mac OS X
  • SpatiaLite•Built on SQLite RDBMS•Just a file•Portable - Works on Windows, Linux or Mac OS X•Implements OGC Simple Features for SQL
  • Community Driven Standards
  • Community Driven Standards Users drive formats
  • How do we share?
  • LayerPackageto theRescue
  • LayerPackageto theRescue
  • What Works for the Layer Package
  • What Works for the Layer Package•Compressed format shares well
  • What Works for the Layer Package•Compressed format shares well•Includes symbology
  • What Works for the Layer Package•Compressed format shares well•Includes symbology•Metadata and preview thumbnails
  • What Works for the Layer Package•Compressed format shares well•Includes symbology•Metadata and preview thumbnails•Easy to create with ArcMap
  • Problems with the Layer Package
  • Problems with the Layer Package•Uses the closed ESRI Layer file for symbology
  • Problems with the Layer Package•Uses the closed ESRI Layer file for symbology•Some files converted to closed File Geodatabase format
  • Problems with the Layer Package•Uses the closed ESRI Layer file for symbology•Some files converted to closed File Geodatabase format•Undocumented
  • We needsymbology with our datasets
  • Options:
  • Options:SLD/SE
  • Options:SLD/SE CSS
  • Put mysymbology in a sidecar!
  • portland.sqliteportland.css
  • Atom, GeoRSS, GeoJSON
  • Atom, GeoRSS, GeoJSON SQLite Spatial SpatiaLiteCSS for Symbology
  • Making data discoverable
  • Spatial Data Can Be
  • Spatial Data Can Be Secure Sensitive Open
  • Availability During Disasters
  • Monetize Where Possible
  • Picking Formats and Target Audience
  • Picking Formats and Target AudiencePhoto used under creative commons from dotbenjamin
  • Picking Formats and Target AudiencePhoto used under creative commons from dotbenjamin
  • Citizen Participation San Diego Fires
  • Sharing Large Datasets
  • Sharing Large Datasets
  • Sharing Large Datasets
  • Sharing Large Datasets
  • So what about vectors?
  • So what about vectors?
  • So what about vectors?
  • So what about vectors? 125 GB
  • Selecting Vectors to Download1.Zoom to your area of interest2.Draw polygon for selection3.Query
  • Vectors in WeoGeo
  • Vectors in WeoGeo Com ing Soo n!
  • What does datainteroperability give us?
  • Breaking Through Stacks
  • Closedformatsshould beavoided
  • Archiving Geo Data
  • How Will People Use Your Data in 10 years?
  • It Was 1998...
  • James was coding upsome cutting edgeESRI MapObjectsand FoxPro Magic
  • Data Archival Systems: 1999
  • My Old Computer is Dead
  • If only I had archived in a non-proprietary format...
  • Ways to keep this fromhappening to with your data...Use Open Formats Use ETL Pray
  • Fight for your right to use open spatial data standards
  • Thank You James Fee email: jfee@weogeo.com twitter: @cageyjamesblog: http://www.spatiallyadjusted.com mobile: 480.225.2287