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Sharing Data in the Age of the GeoWeb
 

Sharing Data in the Age of the GeoWeb

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James looks at how to share data in the age of the GeoWeb.

James looks at how to share data in the age of the GeoWeb.

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  • James Fee\nEvangelist for WeoGeo\nhttp://www.weogeo.com\n
  • I’m going to talk about sharing your spatial data\n
  • I’m going to talk about sharing your spatial data\n
  • \n
  • ESRI can’t open may of the data sharing standards that are becoming prevalent on the GeoWeb such as SpatiaLite, Atom and KML.\n
  • The root of the problem is data portals. They are too difficult to use and don’t get us the answers we need.\n
  • Take desktop GIS software and put it on the internet, that will work won’t it? You want a GIS Professional performing analysis, not creating websites.\n
  • Take geodata.gov\n\nI want to find information about the Central Arizona Project which we Arizonans use to bring water from Colorado to fill our pools.\n
  • The search seemed simple to me until the second screen appears. What is going on here?\n
  • Eventually you get the results and predictably it isn’t anything in Arizona. \n
  • Ground water in Portland, OR should never be result #3 for a search Water in Arizona.\n
  • Yea, huge failure.\n
  • Even changing from a generic “Arizona” to Phoenix, AZ doesn’t improve a thing.\n
  • Data.gov is no better\n
  • Searching for Arizona Copper gives you results, but not anything that seems relevant.\n
  • A quick check shows that the textual search pulls up results that FAIL. See description that says “excludes ... Hawaii”. These datasets shouldn’t show.\n
  • What about Google Maps, didn’t Where 2.0 show us we could use that to find spatial data?\nWell Google shows local search results over spatial data...\n\n\n
  • The CAL-Atlas starts our well searching for GIS data in California. We’ve got a nice map we can use to limit our search to southern California.\n
  • But results still confuse the requester. I’m not sure how “critical habitat” and “Orange County Buildings are related”.\n
  • And what happens when you click on a link. You get metadata.\n
  • And what happens when you click on a link. You get metadata.\n
  • And of course the front page of the USF&WS requires you to start all over again on your data search.\n
  • Screaming at your computer doesn’t help at all...\n
  • So lets think about how we can improve things.\nData formats are the key to start sharing...\n
  • Shapefiles are interop friendly right? \n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • You start with the 3 amigos\nAdd on some projection info and some metadata\nThen throw on some crazy ESRI index stuff that you may need\n\n
  • So you zip up the shapefile....\n
  • So you zip up the shapefile....\n
  • So your friend takes that zip file and drags it to ArcMap.\n
  • So your friend takes that zip file and drags it to ArcMap.\n
  • So your friend takes that zip file and drags it to ArcMap.\n
  • So your friend takes that zip file and drags it to ArcMap.\n
  • So your friend takes that zip file and drags it to ArcMap.\n
  • So your friend takes that zip file and drags it to ArcMap.\n
  • And of course it doesn’t work...\n
  • So can we come up with a standard that the community embraces rather than committees?\n
  • So lets think about what would work for us...\nWhat is important for organizations sharing data and those who want to consume it.\nI put an asterisk after OGC support because we still need committee buy-in for enterprise users\n
  • So lets think about what would work for us...\nWhat is important for organizations sharing data and those who want to consume it.\nI put an asterisk after OGC support because we still need committee buy-in for enterprise users\n
  • So lets think about what would work for us...\nWhat is important for organizations sharing data and those who want to consume it.\nI put an asterisk after OGC support because we still need committee buy-in for enterprise users\n
  • So lets think about what would work for us...\nWhat is important for organizations sharing data and those who want to consume it.\nI put an asterisk after OGC support because we still need committee buy-in for enterprise users\n
  • So lets look at a format that meets many of those requirements.\nESRI’s File Geodatabase, it works with most ESRI platforms, it has symbology, it works on Linux (unlike the Personal Geodatabase) and it stores a lot of different information.\n
  • So this is easy....\n
  • The elephant in the room, he is always around when we are talking ESRI support...\n
  • To access FGDB, you need ArcObjects. No other way, no open APIs, no open source tools read it. Safe’s FME Spatial ETL even requires ArcObjects.\n
  • Which besides licensing, you need to work with this\n
  • People who have grown up in the Internet age, having been exposed to the ideals of open formats, have developed "strong beliefs" in user ownership of data--"what data [users] want, when they want to take it back and what app they want to use". \nThese ideals will be carried into enterprises as this generation matures.\n
  • People who have grown up in the Internet age, having been exposed to the ideals of open formats, have developed "strong beliefs" in user ownership of data--"what data [users] want, when they want to take it back and what app they want to use". \nThese ideals will be carried into enterprises as this generation matures.\n
  • People who have grown up in the Internet age, having been exposed to the ideals of open formats, have developed "strong beliefs" in user ownership of data--"what data [users] want, when they want to take it back and what app they want to use". \nThese ideals will be carried into enterprises as this generation matures.\n
  • So users want open and are demanding open. How can we deliver something?\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • SQLite\nIf it is good enough for these guys\n
  • It is good enough for this guy\n
  • All the benefits of Shapefiles: Open, Easy to use\nNone of the limitations\nMultiple files\nLimited field widths\n
  • All the benefits of Shapefiles: Open, Easy to use\nNone of the limitations\nMultiple files\nLimited field widths\n
  • None of the limitations\nMultiple files and Limited field widths\n
  • None of the limitations\nMultiple files and Limited field widths\n
  • None of the limitations\nMultiple files and Limited field widths\n
  • None of the limitations\nMultiple files and Limited field widths\n
  • None of the limitations\nMultiple files and Limited field widths\n
  • None of the limitations\nMultiple files and Limited field widths\n
  • None of the limitations\nMultiple files and Limited field widths\n
  • None of the limitations\nMultiple files and Limited field widths\n
  • No support from ESRI\nStill not well known in the community\n
  • No support from ESRI\nStill not well known in the community\n
  • No support from ESRI\nStill not well known in the community\n
  • No support from ESRI\nStill not well known in the community\n
  • Built on SQLite RDBMS -- Just a file\nPortable - Works on Windows, Linux or Mac OS X\nImplements OGC Simple Features for SQL -- PostGIS and SQL Server 2008 support OGC SF SQL as well\n
  • Built on SQLite RDBMS -- Just a file\nPortable - Works on Windows, Linux or Mac OS X\nImplements OGC Simple Features for SQL -- PostGIS and SQL Server 2008 support OGC SF SQL as well\n
  • Built on SQLite RDBMS -- Just a file\nPortable - Works on Windows, Linux or Mac OS X\nImplements OGC Simple Features for SQL -- PostGIS and SQL Server 2008 support OGC SF SQL as well\n
  • Community needs to drive new GIS standards. \n\nGeoJSON, GeoRSS are perfect examples. ESRI supports them.\n
  • Community needs to drive new GIS standards. \n\nGeoJSON, GeoRSS are perfect examples. ESRI supports them.\n
  • So lets look at how we share geodata...\n
  • ESRI created their layer package just to solve this problem.\nZip file (like KMZ)\nFGDB + ESRI Layer Symbology\nESRI handler to automatically unzip and add to ArcMap\n\n
  • ESRI created their layer package just to solve this problem.\nZip file (like KMZ)\nFGDB + ESRI Layer Symbology\nESRI handler to automatically unzip and add to ArcMap\n\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • I’ll say right now, symbology is as important as metadata to understanding how a dataset works.\n
  • Styled Layer Descriptor/Symbology Encoding\nCSS\nHas to be something better for Geo...\n
  • Styled Layer Descriptor/Symbology Encoding\nCSS\nHas to be something better for Geo...\n
  • Styled Layer Descriptor/Symbology Encoding\nCSS\nHas to be something better for Geo...\n
  • 1. GSS (Geo Style Sheets) is an evolving specification based on CSS and JSON.\n2. It is designed to handle dynamic data sources in a flexible manner, and allow interactions to be specified directly in the style sheet.\n3. GSS is unique among geographical styling system because it is designed to work directly with Javascript. GSS is a subset of JSON that is intended to feels natural to CSS users.\n
  • 1. GSS (Geo Style Sheets) is an evolving specification based on CSS and JSON.\n2. It is designed to handle dynamic data sources in a flexible manner, and allow interactions to be specified directly in the style sheet.\n3. GSS is unique among geographical styling system because it is designed to work directly with Javascript. GSS is a subset of JSON that is intended to feels natural to CSS users.\n
  • 1. GSS (Geo Style Sheets) is an evolving specification based on CSS and JSON.\n2. It is designed to handle dynamic data sources in a flexible manner, and allow interactions to be specified directly in the style sheet.\n3. GSS is unique among geographical styling system because it is designed to work directly with Javascript. GSS is a subset of JSON that is intended to feels natural to CSS users.\n
  • 1. GSS (Geo Style Sheets) is an evolving specification based on CSS and JSON.\n2. It is designed to handle dynamic data sources in a flexible manner, and allow interactions to be specified directly in the style sheet.\n3. GSS is unique among geographical styling system because it is designed to work directly with Javascript. GSS is a subset of JSON that is intended to feels natural to CSS users.\n
  • I encourage everyone to check out Cartagen and see how GSS can dynamically affect vectors. Just a geospatial style sheet controlling how information is handled and delivered.\nThis is over the web, imagine how it can work on your desktop/server applications...\n
  • So we need to bring the symbology along for the ride.\nDigital photography has for years been putting metadata in sidecars with their data formats (such as GPS, conditions, did the flash fire, ect) which applications such as Adobe Photoshop can read.\nWe should be doing the same with our symbology so our apps can read this information.\n
  • So we need to bring the symbology along for the ride.\nDigital photography has for years been putting metadata in sidecars with their data formats (such as GPS, conditions, did the flash fire, ect) which applications such as Adobe Photoshop can read.\nWe should be doing the same with our symbology so our apps can read this information.\n
  • So what I propose is sharing our data with SQLite, having the GSS file come along for the ride.\nZip is up (compression is nice) and lets call it a GPK or geospatial package.\n
  • So what I propose is sharing our data with SQLite, having the GSS file come along for the ride.\nZip is up (compression is nice) and lets call it a GPK or geospatial package.\n
  • So what I propose is sharing our data with SQLite, having the GSS file come along for the ride.\nZip is up (compression is nice) and lets call it a GPK or geospatial package.\n
  • So what I propose is sharing our data with SQLite, having the GSS file come along for the ride.\nZip is up (compression is nice) and lets call it a GPK or geospatial package.\n
  • So what I propose is sharing our data with SQLite, having the GSS file come along for the ride.\nZip is up (compression is nice) and lets call it a GPK or geospatial package.\n
  • So what I propose is sharing our data with SQLite, having the GSS file come along for the ride.\nZip is up (compression is nice) and lets call it a GPK or geospatial package.\n
  • These software packages already support SQLite, so extending them to support GSS or GPK should be very doable.\nAnd these tools are the guts to many geospatial applications and analysis, the building blocks of data sharing.\n
  • These software packages already support SQLite, so extending them to support GSS or GPK should be very doable.\nAnd these tools are the guts to many geospatial applications and analysis, the building blocks of data sharing.\n
  • These software packages already support SQLite, so extending them to support GSS or GPK should be very doable.\nAnd these tools are the guts to many geospatial applications and analysis, the building blocks of data sharing.\n
  • All community driven standards. \nNo OGC\nProprietary GIS support\n
  • So lets look at what we need to do to make out data discoverable.\n
  • There are three types of spatial data.\nSome we want to be found by Google, some we want to restrict to only some users (via security) and some that we can’t even let people know exists. So figuring out what data you want to share with the world and with your teams is critical to knowing how to share it.\n
  • There are three types of spatial data.\nSome we want to be found by Google, some we want to restrict to only some users (via security) and some that we can’t even let people know exists. So figuring out what data you want to share with the world and with your teams is critical to knowing how to share it.\n
  • There are three types of spatial data.\nSome we want to be found by Google, some we want to restrict to only some users (via security) and some that we can’t even let people know exists. So figuring out what data you want to share with the world and with your teams is critical to knowing how to share it.\n
  • How do you make sure that people can find your data when they need it most?\n
  • Derivative works fuels innovation.\n\nIf we could easily license Tele Atlas or Digital Globe to create our own work and then re license it, both those companies would make more money from additional sales they didn’t have before.\n
  • Know who will be coming by to get your data and make sure they can do so in formats they want. \nGeek on the left wants raw files for rolling his own solutions.\nCybernun wants a finished product (such as PDF or a web map)\n
  • Know who will be coming by to get your data and make sure they can do so in formats they want. \nGeek on the left wants raw files for rolling his own solutions.\nCybernun wants a finished product (such as PDF or a web map)\n
  • Know who will be coming by to get your data and make sure they can do so in formats they want. \nGeek on the left wants raw files for rolling his own solutions.\nCybernun wants a finished product (such as PDF or a web map)\n
  • The key takeaway from this is that the community will build maps on their own, even if you provide them. \nWhat you need to do is offer up your data in consumable formats such as GeoRSS, GeoJSON, KML, SpatiaLite so that the community can incorporate your data into these projects.\n
  • The key takeaway from this is that the community will build maps on their own, even if you provide them. \nWhat you need to do is offer up your data in consumable formats such as GeoRSS, GeoJSON, KML, SpatiaLite so that the community can incorporate your data into these projects.\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • How does one share a huge spatial database?\nTalk about sharing GeoTIFF and MrSID\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Lets take one of the more popular vector GIS datasets - TIGER\nIt is bigger than a small Honda Civic: 125 GB\n
  • Downloading TIGER is a huge PITA\n
  • You have to download each county at a time which takes a long time. \nYou have to download each county in each state!\n
  • You can get down to the county, but sometimes that is too much data.\nSan Bernardino County in California is larger than Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Delaware combined.\nLA County would be a member of the G20. \n
  • Why can’t we clip our search results to a polygon?\n
  • Lets say I’m interested in the area around Fresno. My AOI has 7 counties so to deal with this on the Census website would take a while. Plus I want just roads, so I’d have to post process this after downloading a ton of data.\n
  • We clip out an area of Fresno and the file size decreases from 1 GB to just over 40 MB.\nAnd look, we provide the symbology along for the ride so I don’t have to even worry about how to make that.\n
  • Lastly, the big question is Google.\nThey’ve been trying to enable spatial searches though their search engine, but it isn’t doing a great job. Plus do you really want SEO getting in the way of your data?\nNow that Google owns their own data, how will they license it?\n
  • Lastly, the big question is Google.\nThey’ve been trying to enable spatial searches though their search engine, but it isn’t doing a great job. Plus do you really want SEO getting in the way of your data?\nNow that Google owns their own data, how will they license it?\n
  • So to break the silos limiting our sharing, we are going to have to break the file formats and make it more open.\n
  • So to break the silos limiting our sharing, we are going to have to break the file formats and make it more open.\n
  • As I outlined earlier, today’s users of spatial data want open format, more choice and better selection of spatial datasets. Nothing gets people to move down the road quicker than poor websites, proprietary data formats and lack of symbology.\nOpenStreetMap didn’t happen because a bunch of kids needed something to do on the weekend. It happened because government agencies wouldn’t release data in ways they wanted to work with. Now OSM is just about the biggest vector dataset in the world. \n
  • Thank you for listening to me. \nAre there any questions?\n

Sharing Data in the Age of the GeoWeb Sharing Data in the Age of the GeoWeb Presentation Transcript

  • Sharing Data in the Ageof the GeoWeb James Fee - WeoGeo.com
  • Sharing Your Spatial Data
  • Sharing Your Spatial Data or
  • Sharing Your Spatial Data or How to Push YourGIS Files Through aRound Hole and Live to Tell About it!
  • If Sharing is Easy... http://www.flickr.com/photos/13586721@N05/3122021735/
  • Why is it sohard to sharespatial data?
  • DataInteroperability
  • Data InteroperabilityData Portals...
  • Build itand they will use it!?!?
  • Lets make this simple...
  • Just give me a shapefile
  • california.shpcalifornia.shxcalifornia.dbf
  • california.shpcalifornia.shxcalifornia.dbfcalifornia.prjcalifornia.shp.xml
  • california.cpg california.shpcalifornia.atx california.sbx california.shxcalifornia.sbn california.dbf california.aincalifornia.aih california.prj california.mxscalifornia.ixs california.shp.xml
  • california.cpg california.shpcalifornia.atx california.sbx california.shxcalifornia.sbn california.dbf california.aincalifornia.aih california.prj california.mxscalifornia.ixs california.shp.xml
  • Can We Come Up With a Standard?
  • What would work?
  • What would work? open database
  • What would work? open database open symbology
  • What would work? open database open symbologyplatform support
  • What would work? open database open symbologyplatform support OGC support *
  • ESRI’s File Geodatabase
  • ESRI’s File Geodatabase
  • So just give me a FileGeodatabase
  • Users Demand Format Agnosticism
  • Users Demand Format Agnosticism• Freedom to use any application
  • Users Demand Format Agnosticism•Freedom to use any application• Open formats
  • Users Demand Format Agnosticism•Freedom to use any application• Open formats• User ownership of data
  • So we need an open spatial database format
  • I really wantto get me some of that!
  • “Open Standard” Photo by wiccked - http://flic.kr/p/cLv5z
  • Easy to Use Photo by Jason Gulledge - http://flic.kr/p/z3eWm
  • CleanDesktops! Photo by hummingcrow - http://flic.kr/p/SZdRG
  • No LimitedField Names
  • Desc_ No LimitedField Names
  • Desc_ No Limited PiplneNmField Names
  • Desc_ No Limited PiplneNmField Names RdNme
  • Dte_Colec Desc_ No Limited PiplneNmField Names RdNme
  • Dte_Colec Desc_ No Limited PiplneNmField Names Field1 RdNme
  • Dte_Colec Desc_ No Limited PiplneNmField Names Field1 RdNme Rm_Num
  • Dte_Colec Desc_ No Limited PiplneNmField Names Field1 RdNme Yes Rm_Num
  • Problems with SQLite?
  • Problems with SQLite?
  • Problems with SQLite? *
  • Problems with SQLite? * Never heard of it...
  • SpatiaLite
  • SpatiaLite
  • SpatiaLite Photo by Kansir - http://flic.kr/p/48JMTM
  • SpatiaLite Photo by Kansir - http://flic.kr/p/48JMTM
  • Community Driven Standards
  • Community Driven Standards Users drive formats
  • How do we share?
  • LayerPackageto theRescue
  • LayerPackageto theRescue
  • What Works for the Layer Package
  • What Works for the Layer Package•Compressed format shares well
  • What Works for the Layer Package•Compressed format shares well•Includes symbology
  • What Works for the Layer Package•Compressed format shares well•Includes symbology•Metadata and preview thumbnails
  • What Works for the Layer Package•Compressed format shares well•Includes symbology•Metadata and preview thumbnails•Easy to create with ArcMap
  • Problems with the Layer Package
  • Problems with the Layer Package•Uses the closed ESRI Layer file for symbology
  • Problems with the Layer Package•Uses the closed ESRI Layer file for symbology•Some files converted to closed File Geodatabase format
  • Problems with the Layer Package•Uses the closed ESRI Layer file for symbology•Some files converted to closed File Geodatabase format•Undocumented
  • We needsymbology with our datasets
  • Options:
  • Options:SLD/SE
  • Options:SLD/SE CSS
  • Enter GSS
  • Enter GSSBased on: &
  • Enter GSSBased on: &Handles dynamic data sources
  • Enter GSSBased on: &Handles dynamic data sourcesDesigned to work with
  • Example GSSbody: {! fillStyle: "#f6f6f6",! lineWidth: 0},node: {! fillStyle: "#ddd",! strokeStyle: "#090",! lineWidth: 0,! radius: 1},way: {! strokeStyle: function() {! ! return "#"+(parseInt((this.user),36).toString(16)+"000000").truncate(6,"")! },! lineWidth: function() {! ! if (this.tags.get(width))return parseInt(this.tags.get(width))! ! else return 1! },! fillStyle: "white"
  • http://cartagen.com
  • Put mysymbology in a sidecar!
  • california.sqlitecalifornia.gss
  • california.gpk
  • FDO - Feature Data Objects
  • FDO - Feature Data Objects OGR - Simple Feature Library
  • FDO - Feature Data Objects OGR - Simple Feature Library Safe FME Desktop/Server
  • Atom, GeoRSS, GeoJSON
  • Atom, GeoRSS, GeoJSON SQLiteCSS for Symbology
  • Making data discoverable
  • Spatial Data Can Be
  • Spatial Data Can Be Secure Sensitive Open
  • Availability During Disasters
  • License Derivative Work
  • Picking Formats and Target Audience
  • Picking Formats and Target AudiencePhoto used under creative commons from dotbenjamin
  • Picking Formats and Target AudiencePhoto used under creative commons from dotbenjamin
  • Citizen Participation San Diego Fires
  • Sharing Large Datasets
  • Sharing Large Datasets
  • Sharing Large Datasets
  • Sharing Large Datasets
  • So what about vectors?
  • So what about vectors?
  • So what about vectors? 125 GB
  • Selecting Vectors to Download1.Zoom to your area of interest2.Draw polygon for selection3.Query
  • Vectors in WeoGeo
  • Photo by dawn_perry - http://flic.kr/p/JWeUY Data Silos
  • Photo by dawn_perry - http://flic.kr/p/JWeUY Data Sharing
  • Photo by syntheticaperture - http://flic.kr/p/4b4PcMMore Choice andBetter Selection
  • It’s your choice Photo by syntheticaperture - http://flic.kr/p/4b4PcM More Choice and Better Selection
  • Thanks! James Fee jfee@weogeo.com @cageyjames spatiallyadjusted.com