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11 readingpoetry
 

11 readingpoetry

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    11 readingpoetry 11 readingpoetry Presentation Transcript

    • Reading PoetryThe Experience of Words
    • What Is Poetry?Poetry is a type of rhythmic, compressed language thatuses figures of speech and imagery to appeal to thereader’s emotions and imagination.•A poem captures the poet’s experience and thoughts and offers them to readers for examination. Nature’s first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leaf’s a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost
    • PunctuationPay attention to a poem’s punctuation when you read thepoem aloud. Punctuation indicates where you shouldpause while reading.•Pause whenever you encounter punctuation, even if the punctuation occurs in the middle of a line. • Commas, semicolons, colons, and dashes indicate short pauses. • End punctuation—periods, question marks, and exclamation points—indicates longer pauses.•Do not pause at the end of a line if there is no punctuation there.
    • Word OrderPay attention to the word order in poetry. Poets may useunusual word order to emphasize certain ideas.•If a line or sentence in a poem is confusing, look for the subject and verb.•Rearrange or reword the sentence to help you understand it. Consider what the word order emphasizes. “The foe long since in silence slept; Alike the conqueror silent sleeps; And Time the ruined bridge has swept Down the dark stream which seaward creeps.” from “Concord Hymn” by Ralph Waldo Emerson
    • Figures of SpeechPay attention to figures of speech in poetry. Poets usefigures of speech to add to a poem’s meaning.•Identify figures of speech—similes, metaphors, and personification—and note the effect they produce.•Figures of speech may make a description clear, create a mood, or reveal the speaker’s attitude about the subject.
    • SpeakerPay attention to the poem’s speaker—the voice talking tothe reader.•Look for clues about who is speaking in the poem.•The poet’s own voice may be speaking, or the speaker may be a character the poet has created, an animal, or an object.
    • DictionPay attention to the poem’s diction—a speaker’s choice ofwords. Diction can reveal the speaker’s attitude toward thesubject.•Analyze the speaker’s language choices.•Identify whether the words are mostly positive or negative.•Consider what feelings the words evoke.
    • Sound EffectsPay attention to sound effects in poems. Poets usesound effects to create mood or add emphasis.•Listen to the rhythm of the lines, and determine whether the poem follows a set meter. • Consider how the the rhythm or lack of rhythm affects the poem’s meaning.•Look for rhymes. Poets may follow a certain rhyme scheme or use internal rhyme. However, not all poems rhyme. • Consider how the rhyme scheme affects the poem’s meaning.
    • Sound Effects•Look for other sound effects, such as alliteration and onomatopoeia. • Alliteration is the repetition of consonant sounds. • Onomatopoeia is the use of words that sound like their meanings—for example, bump, slosh, and whimper. • Consider what the sound effects emphasize.
    • RepetitionPay attention to the use of repetition in the poem. A poetmay use repetition to get readers to focus on the themeor most important idea in a poem.•Watch for repeated words or images.•Consider what the repeated words emphasize.
    • Let’s Practice“Truth,” said a traveller,“Is a rock, a mighty fortress;Often have I been to it,Even to its highest tower,From whence the world looks black.”“Truth,” said a traveller,“Is a breath, a wind,A shadow, a phantom;Long have I pursued it,But never have I touchedThe hem of its garment.” from The Black Riders, XXVIII by Stephen Crane
    • Let’s PracticeWhen should you continue reading at the end of a line?Where should you pause? “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a rock, a mighty fortress; Often have I been to it, Even to its highest tower, From whence the world looks black.” “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a breath, a wind, A shadow, a phantom; Long have I pursued it, But never have I touched The hem of its garment.” from The Black Riders, XXVIII by Stephen Crane
    • Let’s PracticeDo you need to rearrange the word order of any line tounderstand it better? “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a rock, a mighty fortress; Often have I been to it, Even to its highest tower, From whence the world looks black.” “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a breath, a wind, A shadow, a phantom; Long have I pursued it, But never have I touched The hem of its garment.” from The Black Riders, XXVIII by Stephen Crane
    • Let’s PracticeWhat figures of speech does the poet use? What do theymean? “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a rock, a mighty fortress; Often have I been to it, Even to its highest tower, From whence the world looks black.” “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a breath, a wind, A shadow, a phantom; Long have I pursued it, But never have I touched The hem of its garment.” from The Black Riders, XXVIII by Stephen Crane
    • Let’s PracticeWho is the speaker in the poem? How does the speaker’sdiction affect the tone of the poem? “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a rock, a mighty fortress; Often have I been to it, Even to its highest tower, From whence the world looks black.” “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a breath, a wind, A shadow, a phantom; Long have I pursued it, But never have I touched The hem of its garment.” from The Black Riders, XXVIII by Stephen Crane
    • Let’s PracticeWhat sound effects does the poet use? What words,phrases, or lines are repeated? “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a rock, a mighty fortress; Often have I been to it, Even to its highest tower, From whence the world looks black.” “Truth,” said a traveller, “Is a breath, a wind, A shadow, a phantom; Long have I pursued it, But never have I touched The hem of its garment.” from The Black Riders, XXVIII by Stephen Crane
    • On Your OwnUse the suggestions in this lesson to analyze this poem. When I am dead and over me bright April Shakes out her rain-drenched hair, Though you should lean above me broken-hearted, I shall not care. I shall have peace, as leafy trees are peaceful When rain bends down the bough; And I shall be more silent and cold-hearted Than you are now. “I Shall Not Care ” by Sara Teasdale
    • The End