Mobilidade - 7a. Mídia

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Presentation made by Wellknown.as at the Brazilian media group RBS. We highlight the impact of mobility into people's lives and the new approaches of media consumption in the mobile space.

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  • We do an annual look into the size of the mobile industry here at the Communities Dominate blog. So its time to review the growth of mobile and report on the technology that has 4 Billion subscribers. Recognizing that the world has about 6.7 Billion people, it means there is a mobile phones subscription now for 60% of the whole planet (source TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).START WITH SCALELets start with comparisons. Newspapers? the total circulation of all daily newspapers worldwide is about 480 milllion. Cars? There are about 800 million cars on the planet. Cable and satellite TV subscriptions? About 850 million. Personal computers including desktops, laptops and netbooks, about 1 billion. Fixed landline telephone connections, about 1.2 billion. eMail users about 1.3 billion. Internet users about 1.4 billion. Television sets about 1.5 billion. And credit cards? About 1.7 billion people carry at least one credit card in their wallet.But there are 4 billion mobile phone subscriptions now in January 2009. More than twice the number of credit card owners, 2.5 times the number of TV sets or internet uses, approx 3 times the number of email users of total landline phones and yes, four times the number of personal computers. This is a monster sized industry, totally towering over all others.OVER 1.1 B NEW PHONES PER YEARIts not just the size of the established industry. It is a dynamic industry selling a massive number of new devices per year. 1.18 Billion new mobile phones were sold in 2008 (IDC 2009). Compare that with approx 280 million new personal computers, laptops and netbooks sold last year, or under 300 million TV sets and we get to understand the scale. More new mobile phones were sold last year, than the total installed base of computers of any kind in the world. And these phones are increasingly powerful phones too. Top end mobile phones have up to 8 megapixel cameras, 3 inch and even 4 inch screens, memory card slots that take 8 gigabyte removable memory cards. Increasingly new phones are 3G high speed data phones, and even higher speed data phones, so-called 3.5G phones are already on the market.Of the established base of phones, over 99% can receive basic SMS text messages, or their equivalents, depending on country and technology. Over 90% of all phones in the world have a basic browser. Over 80% have a colour screen and over 70% have the data connectivity to be able to receive MMS picture messages. Over 60% of all phones are cameraphones. Over 50% of all phones have bluetooth wireless connectivity. 40% of all phones can install Java or Brew based applications. 20% of all phone subscriptions are 3G high speed data enabled and 10% of phones are smartphones (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009)
  • We do an annual look into the size of the mobile industry here at the Communities Dominate blog. So its time to review the growth of mobile and report on the technology that has 4 Billion subscribers. Recognizing that the world has about 6.7 Billion people, it means there is a mobile phones subscription now for 60% of the whole planet (source TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).START WITH SCALELets start with comparisons. Newspapers? the total circulation of all daily newspapers worldwide is about 480 milllion. Cars? There are about 800 million cars on the planet. Cable and satellite TV subscriptions? About 850 million. Personal computers including desktops, laptops and netbooks, about 1 billion. Fixed landline telephone connections, about 1.2 billion. eMail users about 1.3 billion. Internet users about 1.4 billion. Television sets about 1.5 billion. And credit cards? About 1.7 billion people carry at least one credit card in their wallet.But there are 4 billion mobile phone subscriptions now in January 2009. More than twice the number of credit card owners, 2.5 times the number of TV sets or internet uses, approx 3 times the number of email users of total landline phones and yes, four times the number of personal computers. This is a monster sized industry, totally towering over all others.OVER 1.1 B NEW PHONES PER YEARIts not just the size of the established industry. It is a dynamic industry selling a massive number of new devices per year. 1.18 Billion new mobile phones were sold in 2008 (IDC 2009). Compare that with approx 280 million new personal computers, laptops and netbooks sold last year, or under 300 million TV sets and we get to understand the scale. More new mobile phones were sold last year, than the total installed base of computers of any kind in the world. And these phones are increasingly powerful phones too. Top end mobile phones have up to 8 megapixel cameras, 3 inch and even 4 inch screens, memory card slots that take 8 gigabyte removable memory cards. Increasingly new phones are 3G high speed data phones, and even higher speed data phones, so-called 3.5G phones are already on the market.Of the established base of phones, over 99% can receive basic SMS text messages, or their equivalents, depending on country and technology. Over 90% of all phones in the world have a basic browser. Over 80% have a colour screen and over 70% have the data connectivity to be able to receive MMS picture messages. Over 60% of all phones are cameraphones. Over 50% of all phones have bluetooth wireless connectivity. 40% of all phones can install Java or Brew based applications. 20% of all phone subscriptions are 3G high speed data enabled and 10% of phones are smartphones (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009)
  • We do an annual look into the size of the mobile industry here at the Communities Dominate blog. So its time to review the growth of mobile and report on the technology that has 4 Billion subscribers. Recognizing that the world has about 6.7 Billion people, it means there is a mobile phones subscription now for 60% of the whole planet (source TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).START WITH SCALELets start with comparisons. Newspapers? the total circulation of all daily newspapers worldwide is about 480 milllion. Cars? There are about 800 million cars on the planet. Cable and satellite TV subscriptions? About 850 million. Personal computers including desktops, laptops and netbooks, about 1 billion. Fixed landline telephone connections, about 1.2 billion. eMail users about 1.3 billion. Internet users about 1.4 billion. Television sets about 1.5 billion. And credit cards? About 1.7 billion people carry at least one credit card in their wallet.But there are 4 billion mobile phone subscriptions now in January 2009. More than twice the number of credit card owners, 2.5 times the number of TV sets or internet uses, approx 3 times the number of email users of total landline phones and yes, four times the number of personal computers. This is a monster sized industry, totally towering over all others.OVER 1.1 B NEW PHONES PER YEARIts not just the size of the established industry. It is a dynamic industry selling a massive number of new devices per year. 1.18 Billion new mobile phones were sold in 2008 (IDC 2009). Compare that with approx 280 million new personal computers, laptops and netbooks sold last year, or under 300 million TV sets and we get to understand the scale. More new mobile phones were sold last year, than the total installed base of computers of any kind in the world. And these phones are increasingly powerful phones too. Top end mobile phones have up to 8 megapixel cameras, 3 inch and even 4 inch screens, memory card slots that take 8 gigabyte removable memory cards. Increasingly new phones are 3G high speed data phones, and even higher speed data phones, so-called 3.5G phones are already on the market.Of the established base of phones, over 99% can receive basic SMS text messages, or their equivalents, depending on country and technology. Over 90% of all phones in the world have a basic browser. Over 80% have a colour screen and over 70% have the data connectivity to be able to receive MMS picture messages. Over 60% of all phones are cameraphones. Over 50% of all phones have bluetooth wireless connectivity. 40% of all phones can install Java or Brew based applications. 20% of all phone subscriptions are 3G high speed data enabled and 10% of phones are smartphones (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009)
  • We do an annual look into the size of the mobile industry here at the Communities Dominate blog. So its time to review the growth of mobile and report on the technology that has 4 Billion subscribers. Recognizing that the world has about 6.7 Billion people, it means there is a mobile phones subscription now for 60% of the whole planet (source TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).START WITH SCALELets start with comparisons. Newspapers? the total circulation of all daily newspapers worldwide is about 480 milllion. Cars? There are about 800 million cars on the planet. Cable and satellite TV subscriptions? About 850 million. Personal computers including desktops, laptops and netbooks, about 1 billion. Fixed landline telephone connections, about 1.2 billion. eMail users about 1.3 billion. Internet users about 1.4 billion. Television sets about 1.5 billion. And credit cards? About 1.7 billion people carry at least one credit card in their wallet.But there are 4 billion mobile phone subscriptions now in January 2009. More than twice the number of credit card owners, 2.5 times the number of TV sets or internet uses, approx 3 times the number of email users of total landline phones and yes, four times the number of personal computers. This is a monster sized industry, totally towering over all others.OVER 1.1 B NEW PHONES PER YEARIts not just the size of the established industry. It is a dynamic industry selling a massive number of new devices per year. 1.18 Billion new mobile phones were sold in 2008 (IDC 2009). Compare that with approx 280 million new personal computers, laptops and netbooks sold last year, or under 300 million TV sets and we get to understand the scale. More new mobile phones were sold last year, than the total installed base of computers of any kind in the world. And these phones are increasingly powerful phones too. Top end mobile phones have up to 8 megapixel cameras, 3 inch and even 4 inch screens, memory card slots that take 8 gigabyte removable memory cards. Increasingly new phones are 3G high speed data phones, and even higher speed data phones, so-called 3.5G phones are already on the market.Of the established base of phones, over 99% can receive basic SMS text messages, or their equivalents, depending on country and technology. Over 90% of all phones in the world have a basic browser. Over 80% have a colour screen and over 70% have the data connectivity to be able to receive MMS picture messages. Over 60% of all phones are cameraphones. Over 50% of all phones have bluetooth wireless connectivity. 40% of all phones can install Java or Brew based applications. 20% of all phone subscriptions are 3G high speed data enabled and 10% of phones are smartphones (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009)
  • We do an annual look into the size of the mobile industry here at the Communities Dominate blog. So its time to review the growth of mobile and report on the technology that has 4 Billion subscribers. Recognizing that the world has about 6.7 Billion people, it means there is a mobile phones subscription now for 60% of the whole planet (source TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).START WITH SCALELets start with comparisons. Newspapers? the total circulation of all daily newspapers worldwide is about 480 milllion. Cars? There are about 800 million cars on the planet. Cable and satellite TV subscriptions? About 850 million. Personal computers including desktops, laptops and netbooks, about 1 billion. Fixed landline telephone connections, about 1.2 billion. eMail users about 1.3 billion. Internet users about 1.4 billion. Television sets about 1.5 billion. And credit cards? About 1.7 billion people carry at least one credit card in their wallet.But there are 4 billion mobile phone subscriptions now in January 2009. More than twice the number of credit card owners, 2.5 times the number of TV sets or internet uses, approx 3 times the number of email users of total landline phones and yes, four times the number of personal computers. This is a monster sized industry, totally towering over all others.OVER 1.1 B NEW PHONES PER YEARIts not just the size of the established industry. It is a dynamic industry selling a massive number of new devices per year. 1.18 Billion new mobile phones were sold in 2008 (IDC 2009). Compare that with approx 280 million new personal computers, laptops and netbooks sold last year, or under 300 million TV sets and we get to understand the scale. More new mobile phones were sold last year, than the total installed base of computers of any kind in the world. And these phones are increasingly powerful phones too. Top end mobile phones have up to 8 megapixel cameras, 3 inch and even 4 inch screens, memory card slots that take 8 gigabyte removable memory cards. Increasingly new phones are 3G high speed data phones, and even higher speed data phones, so-called 3.5G phones are already on the market.Of the established base of phones, over 99% can receive basic SMS text messages, or their equivalents, depending on country and technology. Over 90% of all phones in the world have a basic browser. Over 80% have a colour screen and over 70% have the data connectivity to be able to receive MMS picture messages. Over 60% of all phones are cameraphones. Over 50% of all phones have bluetooth wireless connectivity. 40% of all phones can install Java or Brew based applications. 20% of all phone subscriptions are 3G high speed data enabled and 10% of phones are smartphones (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009)
  • We do an annual look into the size of the mobile industry here at the Communities Dominate blog. So its time to review the growth of mobile and report on the technology that has 4 Billion subscribers. Recognizing that the world has about 6.7 Billion people, it means there is a mobile phones subscription now for 60% of the whole planet (source TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).START WITH SCALELets start with comparisons. Newspapers? the total circulation of all daily newspapers worldwide is about 480 milllion. Cars? There are about 800 million cars on the planet. Cable and satellite TV subscriptions? About 850 million. Personal computers including desktops, laptops and netbooks, about 1 billion. Fixed landline telephone connections, about 1.2 billion. eMail users about 1.3 billion. Internet users about 1.4 billion. Television sets about 1.5 billion. And credit cards? About 1.7 billion people carry at least one credit card in their wallet.But there are 4 billion mobile phone subscriptions now in January 2009. More than twice the number of credit card owners, 2.5 times the number of TV sets or internet uses, approx 3 times the number of email users of total landline phones and yes, four times the number of personal computers. This is a monster sized industry, totally towering over all others.OVER 1.1 B NEW PHONES PER YEARIts not just the size of the established industry. It is a dynamic industry selling a massive number of new devices per year. 1.18 Billion new mobile phones were sold in 2008 (IDC 2009). Compare that with approx 280 million new personal computers, laptops and netbooks sold last year, or under 300 million TV sets and we get to understand the scale. More new mobile phones were sold last year, than the total installed base of computers of any kind in the world. And these phones are increasingly powerful phones too. Top end mobile phones have up to 8 megapixel cameras, 3 inch and even 4 inch screens, memory card slots that take 8 gigabyte removable memory cards. Increasingly new phones are 3G high speed data phones, and even higher speed data phones, so-called 3.5G phones are already on the market.Of the established base of phones, over 99% can receive basic SMS text messages, or their equivalents, depending on country and technology. Over 90% of all phones in the world have a basic browser. Over 80% have a colour screen and over 70% have the data connectivity to be able to receive MMS picture messages. Over 60% of all phones are cameraphones. Over 50% of all phones have bluetooth wireless connectivity. 40% of all phones can install Java or Brew based applications. 20% of all phone subscriptions are 3G high speed data enabled and 10% of phones are smartphones (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009)
  • We do an annual look into the size of the mobile industry here at the Communities Dominate blog. So its time to review the growth of mobile and report on the technology that has 4 Billion subscribers. Recognizing that the world has about 6.7 Billion people, it means there is a mobile phones subscription now for 60% of the whole planet (source TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).START WITH SCALELets start with comparisons. Newspapers? the total circulation of all daily newspapers worldwide is about 480 milllion. Cars? There are about 800 million cars on the planet. Cable and satellite TV subscriptions? About 850 million. Personal computers including desktops, laptops and netbooks, about 1 billion. Fixed landline telephone connections, about 1.2 billion. eMail users about 1.3 billion. Internet users about 1.4 billion. Television sets about 1.5 billion. And credit cards? About 1.7 billion people carry at least one credit card in their wallet.But there are 4 billion mobile phone subscriptions now in January 2009. More than twice the number of credit card owners, 2.5 times the number of TV sets or internet uses, approx 3 times the number of email users of total landline phones and yes, four times the number of personal computers. This is a monster sized industry, totally towering over all others.OVER 1.1 B NEW PHONES PER YEARIts not just the size of the established industry. It is a dynamic industry selling a massive number of new devices per year. 1.18 Billion new mobile phones were sold in 2008 (IDC 2009). Compare that with approx 280 million new personal computers, laptops and netbooks sold last year, or under 300 million TV sets and we get to understand the scale. More new mobile phones were sold last year, than the total installed base of computers of any kind in the world. And these phones are increasingly powerful phones too. Top end mobile phones have up to 8 megapixel cameras, 3 inch and even 4 inch screens, memory card slots that take 8 gigabyte removable memory cards. Increasingly new phones are 3G high speed data phones, and even higher speed data phones, so-called 3.5G phones are already on the market.Of the established base of phones, over 99% can receive basic SMS text messages, or their equivalents, depending on country and technology. Over 90% of all phones in the world have a basic browser. Over 80% have a colour screen and over 70% have the data connectivity to be able to receive MMS picture messages. Over 60% of all phones are cameraphones. Over 50% of all phones have bluetooth wireless connectivity. 40% of all phones can install Java or Brew based applications. 20% of all phone subscriptions are 3G high speed data enabled and 10% of phones are smartphones (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009)
  • We do an annual look into the size of the mobile industry here at the Communities Dominate blog. So its time to review the growth of mobile and report on the technology that has 4 Billion subscribers. Recognizing that the world has about 6.7 Billion people, it means there is a mobile phones subscription now for 60% of the whole planet (source TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).START WITH SCALELets start with comparisons. Newspapers? the total circulation of all daily newspapers worldwide is about 480 milllion. Cars? There are about 800 million cars on the planet. Cable and satellite TV subscriptions? About 850 million. Personal computers including desktops, laptops and netbooks, about 1 billion. Fixed landline telephone connections, about 1.2 billion. eMail users about 1.3 billion. Internet users about 1.4 billion. Television sets about 1.5 billion. And credit cards? About 1.7 billion people carry at least one credit card in their wallet.But there are 4 billion mobile phone subscriptions now in January 2009. More than twice the number of credit card owners, 2.5 times the number of TV sets or internet uses, approx 3 times the number of email users of total landline phones and yes, four times the number of personal computers. This is a monster sized industry, totally towering over all others.OVER 1.1 B NEW PHONES PER YEARIts not just the size of the established industry. It is a dynamic industry selling a massive number of new devices per year. 1.18 Billion new mobile phones were sold in 2008 (IDC 2009). Compare that with approx 280 million new personal computers, laptops and netbooks sold last year, or under 300 million TV sets and we get to understand the scale. More new mobile phones were sold last year, than the total installed base of computers of any kind in the world. And these phones are increasingly powerful phones too. Top end mobile phones have up to 8 megapixel cameras, 3 inch and even 4 inch screens, memory card slots that take 8 gigabyte removable memory cards. Increasingly new phones are 3G high speed data phones, and even higher speed data phones, so-called 3.5G phones are already on the market.Of the established base of phones, over 99% can receive basic SMS text messages, or their equivalents, depending on country and technology. Over 90% of all phones in the world have a basic browser. Over 80% have a colour screen and over 70% have the data connectivity to be able to receive MMS picture messages. Over 60% of all phones are cameraphones. Over 50% of all phones have bluetooth wireless connectivity. 40% of all phones can install Java or Brew based applications. 20% of all phone subscriptions are 3G high speed data enabled and 10% of phones are smartphones (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009)
  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).

  • As we report on this blog and in our books, Mobile is the newest and least understood mass media channel. If counted in sequential order, mobile is the 7th of the mass media (Print is first, recordings second, cinema third, radio fourth, TV fifth and the internet the sixth mass media channel). Mobile only became a mass media channel ten years ago when in the autumn of 1998, the first downloadable ringing tones (very basic music content) became available to download to a few select phones, in Finland. Ten years later, at the end of 2008, the mobile content industry was worth about 71 Billion dollars worldwide, led by music, gaming, social networking and various TV, video and TV-related services such as TV voting by SMS (TomiAhonen Consulting 2009).








  • 40M iPhones (& iPod Touch)
    operadoras e software
    plataforma muda comportamento
  • 40M iPhones (& iPod Touch)
    operadoras e software
    plataforma muda comportamento
  • About 10 million apps were downloaded in the first week of the launch of the Apps Store. In its first month, more than 60 million software programs were downloaded, and it generated about $1 million a day in sales. On July 10, 2008, Apple CEO Steve Jobs told USA Today that the App Store contained 500 third-party applications for the iPhone and the iPod Touch, 125 of which were free downloads. These third party applications range from business to game applications, entertainment to educational applications, and many more applications available for free or for sale. As of July 11, 2008, users may buy applications from the App Store, and transfer them to an iPhone or iPod Touch with the iPhone 2.0 software update, which became available through iTunes on the same day. 10 million applications were downloaded the first weekend.[9] On January 16, 2009, Apple announced on its website that 500 million applications had been downloaded.[
  • Note: For HTC, Gartner counts only the company's own-branded devices including the G1.
    Symbian accounted for 49.3 per cent of worldwide smartphone operating systems (OS) market share in the first quarter of 2009, down from 56.9 per cent share in the first quarter of 2008. RIM’s smartphone OS market share reached 19.9 per cent in the first quarter of 2009, up from 13.3 per cent share in the first quarter of last year. The iPhone OS accounted for 10.8 per cent of the market, up from 5.3 per cent market share in the first quarter of 2008.
    To keep pace with the competition and the slew of new products, the race is on to update the respective mobile operating systems as well. Android's 1.5, or Cupcake, update is out now, while RIM just finished tweaking the BlackBerry operating system to support touchscreens and speedier browsing.
    Finally, Apple is poised to release iPhone OS version 3.0, with a slew of enhancements as Palm is readying its new mobile platform, webOS, to coincide with debut of its upcoming Pre smartphone.
  • Note: For HTC, Gartner counts only the company's own-branded devices including the G1.
    Symbian accounted for 49.3 per cent of worldwide smartphone operating systems (OS) market share in the first quarter of 2009, down from 56.9 per cent share in the first quarter of 2008. RIM’s smartphone OS market share reached 19.9 per cent in the first quarter of 2009, up from 13.3 per cent share in the first quarter of last year. The iPhone OS accounted for 10.8 per cent of the market, up from 5.3 per cent market share in the first quarter of 2008.
    To keep pace with the competition and the slew of new products, the race is on to update the respective mobile operating systems as well. Android's 1.5, or Cupcake, update is out now, while RIM just finished tweaking the BlackBerry operating system to support touchscreens and speedier browsing.
    Finally, Apple is poised to release iPhone OS version 3.0, with a slew of enhancements as Palm is readying its new mobile platform, webOS, to coincide with debut of its upcoming Pre smartphone.
  • Note: For HTC, Gartner counts only the company's own-branded devices including the G1.
    Symbian accounted for 49.3 per cent of worldwide smartphone operating systems (OS) market share in the first quarter of 2009, down from 56.9 per cent share in the first quarter of 2008. RIM’s smartphone OS market share reached 19.9 per cent in the first quarter of 2009, up from 13.3 per cent share in the first quarter of last year. The iPhone OS accounted for 10.8 per cent of the market, up from 5.3 per cent market share in the first quarter of 2008.
    To keep pace with the competition and the slew of new products, the race is on to update the respective mobile operating systems as well. Android's 1.5, or Cupcake, update is out now, while RIM just finished tweaking the BlackBerry operating system to support touchscreens and speedier browsing.
    Finally, Apple is poised to release iPhone OS version 3.0, with a slew of enhancements as Palm is readying its new mobile platform, webOS, to coincide with debut of its upcoming Pre smartphone.
  • The number of people using their mobile device daily to access online news and information more than doubled from January 2008 to January 2009 and now stands at 22.4 million, according to data from comScore. Among the total audience of 63.2 million people who accessed news and information on their mobile devices in January 2009, more than a third (35%) did so daily. In January, 22.3 million people accessed news and information via a downloaded application.
    News is migrating to mobile. Globally 17% of all mobile phone subscribers pay to get news on their phones. That may seem like a small number, until you notice it is 680 million subscribers, and the total daily newspaper circulation worldwide is about 480 million. So paid mobile phone based news is consumed by 41% more consumers on the planet, than who pay for a newspaper. In many Asian countries mobile news consumption is past 30% of subscribers. I could go on. I hope I have illustrated mhy point. (All the data in this paragraph TomiAhonen Consulting 2009.)
  • The number of people using their mobile device daily to access online news and information more than doubled from January 2008 to January 2009 and now stands at 22.4 million, according to data from comScore. Among the total audience of 63.2 million people who accessed news and information on their mobile devices in January 2009, more than a third (35%) did so daily. In January, 22.3 million people accessed news and information via a downloaded application.
    News is migrating to mobile. Globally 17% of all mobile phone subscribers pay to get news on their phones. That may seem like a small number, until you notice it is 680 million subscribers, and the total daily newspaper circulation worldwide is about 480 million. So paid mobile phone based news is consumed by 41% more consumers on the planet, than who pay for a newspaper. In many Asian countries mobile news consumption is past 30% of subscribers. I could go on. I hope I have illustrated mhy point. (All the data in this paragraph TomiAhonen Consulting 2009.)
  • The number of people using their mobile device daily to access online news and information more than doubled from January 2008 to January 2009 and now stands at 22.4 million, according to data from comScore. Among the total audience of 63.2 million people who accessed news and information on their mobile devices in January 2009, more than a third (35%) did so daily. In January, 22.3 million people accessed news and information via a downloaded application.
    News is migrating to mobile. Globally 17% of all mobile phone subscribers pay to get news on their phones. That may seem like a small number, until you notice it is 680 million subscribers, and the total daily newspaper circulation worldwide is about 480 million. So paid mobile phone based news is consumed by 41% more consumers on the planet, than who pay for a newspaper. In many Asian countries mobile news consumption is past 30% of subscribers. I could go on. I hope I have illustrated mhy point. (All the data in this paragraph TomiAhonen Consulting 2009.)
  • The number of people using their mobile device daily to access online news and information more than doubled from January 2008 to January 2009 and now stands at 22.4 million, according to data from comScore. Among the total audience of 63.2 million people who accessed news and information on their mobile devices in January 2009, more than a third (35%) did so daily. In January, 22.3 million people accessed news and information via a downloaded application.
    News is migrating to mobile. Globally 17% of all mobile phone subscribers pay to get news on their phones. That may seem like a small number, until you notice it is 680 million subscribers, and the total daily newspaper circulation worldwide is about 480 million. So paid mobile phone based news is consumed by 41% more consumers on the planet, than who pay for a newspaper. In many Asian countries mobile news consumption is past 30% of subscribers. I could go on. I hope I have illustrated mhy point. (All the data in this paragraph TomiAhonen Consulting 2009.)
  • The number of people using their mobile device daily to access online news and information more than doubled from January 2008 to January 2009 and now stands at 22.4 million, according to data from comScore. Among the total audience of 63.2 million people who accessed news and information on their mobile devices in January 2009, more than a third (35%) did so daily. In January, 22.3 million people accessed news and information via a downloaded application.
    News is migrating to mobile. Globally 17% of all mobile phone subscribers pay to get news on their phones. That may seem like a small number, until you notice it is 680 million subscribers, and the total daily newspaper circulation worldwide is about 480 million. So paid mobile phone based news is consumed by 41% more consumers on the planet, than who pay for a newspaper. In many Asian countries mobile news consumption is past 30% of subscribers. I could go on. I hope I have illustrated mhy point. (All the data in this paragraph TomiAhonen Consulting 2009.)
  • The number of people using their mobile device daily to access online news and information more than doubled from January 2008 to January 2009 and now stands at 22.4 million, according to data from comScore. Among the total audience of 63.2 million people who accessed news and information on their mobile devices in January 2009, more than a third (35%) did so daily. In January, 22.3 million people accessed news and information via a downloaded application.
    News is migrating to mobile. Globally 17% of all mobile phone subscribers pay to get news on their phones. That may seem like a small number, until you notice it is 680 million subscribers, and the total daily newspaper circulation worldwide is about 480 million. So paid mobile phone based news is consumed by 41% more consumers on the planet, than who pay for a newspaper. In many Asian countries mobile news consumption is past 30% of subscribers. I could go on. I hope I have illustrated mhy point. (All the data in this paragraph TomiAhonen Consulting 2009.)
  • Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. remain strong, topping $23 billion, according to the 2008 Internet Advertising Revenue Report.
    In light of the heightened activity and interest, eMarketer forecasts that mobile advertising will rise from $648 million in 2008 to $3.3 billion in 2013.
    The market value is \"over-estimated in the short term and under-estimated in the long term.”
    3 ou of 4 marketers plan to hike spending on mobile advertisement.
    The mobile ad market is the Internet ad market of 10 years ago.
    Calling a toll free phone number published in the ads is the most common means of response; iPhone users called twice as much as non-iPhone users
    One in seven consumers reported buying a product or visiting a store as a result of seeing a mobile advertisement; for iPhone users, more than one in four bought something as a result of seeing an ad
    Mobile ad click-through rates fluctuate from 2 percent to 20 percent. But they are consistently higher than online. Mobile is also vastly more effective, in part because the lack of clutter. One banner ad per mobile Web page is more engaging than the dozens that crowd the average Internet website. In fact, one of Nokia's advertisers reports ads on mobile are outperforming Web ads by eight times.

  • Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. remain strong, topping $23 billion, according to the 2008 Internet Advertising Revenue Report.
    In light of the heightened activity and interest, eMarketer forecasts that mobile advertising will rise from $648 million in 2008 to $3.3 billion in 2013.
    The market value is \"over-estimated in the short term and under-estimated in the long term.”
    3 ou of 4 marketers plan to hike spending on mobile advertisement.
    The mobile ad market is the Internet ad market of 10 years ago.
    Calling a toll free phone number published in the ads is the most common means of response; iPhone users called twice as much as non-iPhone users
    One in seven consumers reported buying a product or visiting a store as a result of seeing a mobile advertisement; for iPhone users, more than one in four bought something as a result of seeing an ad
    Mobile ad click-through rates fluctuate from 2 percent to 20 percent. But they are consistently higher than online. Mobile is also vastly more effective, in part because the lack of clutter. One banner ad per mobile Web page is more engaging than the dozens that crowd the average Internet website. In fact, one of Nokia's advertisers reports ads on mobile are outperforming Web ads by eight times.

  • Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. remain strong, topping $23 billion, according to the 2008 Internet Advertising Revenue Report.
    In light of the heightened activity and interest, eMarketer forecasts that mobile advertising will rise from $648 million in 2008 to $3.3 billion in 2013.
    The market value is \"over-estimated in the short term and under-estimated in the long term.”
    3 ou of 4 marketers plan to hike spending on mobile advertisement.
    The mobile ad market is the Internet ad market of 10 years ago.
    Calling a toll free phone number published in the ads is the most common means of response; iPhone users called twice as much as non-iPhone users
    One in seven consumers reported buying a product or visiting a store as a result of seeing a mobile advertisement; for iPhone users, more than one in four bought something as a result of seeing an ad
    Mobile ad click-through rates fluctuate from 2 percent to 20 percent. But they are consistently higher than online. Mobile is also vastly more effective, in part because the lack of clutter. One banner ad per mobile Web page is more engaging than the dozens that crowd the average Internet website. In fact, one of Nokia's advertisers reports ads on mobile are outperforming Web ads by eight times.

  • Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. remain strong, topping $23 billion, according to the 2008 Internet Advertising Revenue Report.
    In light of the heightened activity and interest, eMarketer forecasts that mobile advertising will rise from $648 million in 2008 to $3.3 billion in 2013.
    The market value is \"over-estimated in the short term and under-estimated in the long term.”
    3 ou of 4 marketers plan to hike spending on mobile advertisement.
    The mobile ad market is the Internet ad market of 10 years ago.
    Calling a toll free phone number published in the ads is the most common means of response; iPhone users called twice as much as non-iPhone users
    One in seven consumers reported buying a product or visiting a store as a result of seeing a mobile advertisement; for iPhone users, more than one in four bought something as a result of seeing an ad
    Mobile ad click-through rates fluctuate from 2 percent to 20 percent. But they are consistently higher than online. Mobile is also vastly more effective, in part because the lack of clutter. One banner ad per mobile Web page is more engaging than the dozens that crowd the average Internet website. In fact, one of Nokia's advertisers reports ads on mobile are outperforming Web ads by eight times.

  • Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. remain strong, topping $23 billion, according to the 2008 Internet Advertising Revenue Report.
    In light of the heightened activity and interest, eMarketer forecasts that mobile advertising will rise from $648 million in 2008 to $3.3 billion in 2013.
    The market value is \"over-estimated in the short term and under-estimated in the long term.”
    3 ou of 4 marketers plan to hike spending on mobile advertisement.
    The mobile ad market is the Internet ad market of 10 years ago.
    Calling a toll free phone number published in the ads is the most common means of response; iPhone users called twice as much as non-iPhone users
    One in seven consumers reported buying a product or visiting a store as a result of seeing a mobile advertisement; for iPhone users, more than one in four bought something as a result of seeing an ad
    Mobile ad click-through rates fluctuate from 2 percent to 20 percent. But they are consistently higher than online. Mobile is also vastly more effective, in part because the lack of clutter. One banner ad per mobile Web page is more engaging than the dozens that crowd the average Internet website. In fact, one of Nokia's advertisers reports ads on mobile are outperforming Web ads by eight times.

  • Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. remain strong, topping $23 billion, according to the 2008 Internet Advertising Revenue Report.
    In light of the heightened activity and interest, eMarketer forecasts that mobile advertising will rise from $648 million in 2008 to $3.3 billion in 2013.
    The market value is \"over-estimated in the short term and under-estimated in the long term.”
    3 ou of 4 marketers plan to hike spending on mobile advertisement.
    The mobile ad market is the Internet ad market of 10 years ago.
    Calling a toll free phone number published in the ads is the most common means of response; iPhone users called twice as much as non-iPhone users
    One in seven consumers reported buying a product or visiting a store as a result of seeing a mobile advertisement; for iPhone users, more than one in four bought something as a result of seeing an ad
    Mobile ad click-through rates fluctuate from 2 percent to 20 percent. But they are consistently higher than online. Mobile is also vastly more effective, in part because the lack of clutter. One banner ad per mobile Web page is more engaging than the dozens that crowd the average Internet website. In fact, one of Nokia's advertisers reports ads on mobile are outperforming Web ads by eight times.

  • Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. remain strong, topping $23 billion, according to the 2008 Internet Advertising Revenue Report.
    In light of the heightened activity and interest, eMarketer forecasts that mobile advertising will rise from $648 million in 2008 to $3.3 billion in 2013.
    The market value is \"over-estimated in the short term and under-estimated in the long term.”
    3 ou of 4 marketers plan to hike spending on mobile advertisement.
    The mobile ad market is the Internet ad market of 10 years ago.
    Calling a toll free phone number published in the ads is the most common means of response; iPhone users called twice as much as non-iPhone users
    One in seven consumers reported buying a product or visiting a store as a result of seeing a mobile advertisement; for iPhone users, more than one in four bought something as a result of seeing an ad
    Mobile ad click-through rates fluctuate from 2 percent to 20 percent. But they are consistently higher than online. Mobile is also vastly more effective, in part because the lack of clutter. One banner ad per mobile Web page is more engaging than the dozens that crowd the average Internet website. In fact, one of Nokia's advertisers reports ads on mobile are outperforming Web ads by eight times.

  • Internet advertising revenues in the U.S. remain strong, topping $23 billion, according to the 2008 Internet Advertising Revenue Report.
    In light of the heightened activity and interest, eMarketer forecasts that mobile advertising will rise from $648 million in 2008 to $3.3 billion in 2013.
    The market value is \"over-estimated in the short term and under-estimated in the long term.”
    3 ou of 4 marketers plan to hike spending on mobile advertisement.
    The mobile ad market is the Internet ad market of 10 years ago.
    Calling a toll free phone number published in the ads is the most common means of response; iPhone users called twice as much as non-iPhone users
    One in seven consumers reported buying a product or visiting a store as a result of seeing a mobile advertisement; for iPhone users, more than one in four bought something as a result of seeing an ad
    Mobile ad click-through rates fluctuate from 2 percent to 20 percent. But they are consistently higher than online. Mobile is also vastly more effective, in part because the lack of clutter. One banner ad per mobile Web page is more engaging than the dozens that crowd the average Internet website. In fact, one of Nokia's advertisers reports ads on mobile are outperforming Web ads by eight times.














  • 359 (normal)
    489 (DX)





  • Mobilidade - 7a. Mídia

    1. 1. Mobilidade - a 7a. mídia? Rodrigo {Mazzilli, Kochenburger} wellknown.as
    2. 2. Agenda • Mobilidade: uma nova mídia? • Revolução iPhone • Batalha de plataformas • Consumo de informação • Monetização • Entrega, acesso de conteúdo, exemplos • Aspectos sociais e colaborativos • Leitores digitais, eBooks
    3. 3. Impacto de uma nova mídia Fonte: TomiAhonen Consulting, IDC, 2009
    4. 4. Impacto de uma nova mídia 4,000 m 3,000 m 2,000 m 1,000 m Jornais 0m PC Telefone Internet TV Celular Fonte: TomiAhonen Consulting, IDC, 2009
    5. 5. Impacto de uma nova mídia 1,18 B celulares (2008) 4,000 m 3,000 m 2,000 m 1,000 m Jornais 0m PC Telefone Internet TV Celular Fonte: TomiAhonen Consulting, IDC, 2009
    6. 6. Impacto de uma nova mídia 1,18 B celulares (2008) 4,000 m 3,000 m navegador: 90% 2,000 m 1,000 m Jornais 0m PC Telefone Internet TV Celular Fonte: TomiAhonen Consulting, IDC, 2009
    7. 7. Impacto de uma nova mídia 1,18 B celulares (2008) 4,000 m 3,000 m navegador: 90% 2,000 m câmera: 60% 1,000 m Jornais 0m PC Telefone Internet TV Celular Fonte: TomiAhonen Consulting, IDC, 2009
    8. 8. Impacto de uma nova mídia 1,18 B celulares (2008) 4,000 m 3,000 m navegador: 90% 2,000 m câmera: 60% 1,000 m Jornais PC Telefone Internet 0m 3G: 20% TV Celular Fonte: TomiAhonen Consulting, IDC, 2009
    9. 9. Impacto de uma nova mídia 1,18 B celulares (2008) 4,000 m 3,000 m navegador: 90% 2,000 m câmera: 60% 1,000 m Jornais PC Telefone Internet 0m 3G: 20% TV Celular smartphones: 10% Fonte: TomiAhonen Consulting, IDC, 2009
    10. 10. 7a. Mídia de Massa
    11. 11. 7a. Mídia de Massa Imprensa (1500s) 1
    12. 12. 7a. Mídia de Massa Gravadoras (1900s) Imprensa (1500s) 2 1
    13. 13. 7a. Mídia de Massa Cinema (1910s) Gravadoras (1900s) Imprensa 3 (1500s) 2 1
    14. 14. 7a. Mídia de Massa Rádio (1920s) Cinema (1910s) Gravadoras 4 (1900s) Imprensa 3 (1500s) 2 1
    15. 15. 7a. Mídia de Massa Rádio (1920s) Cinema (1910s) 5 Gravadoras 4 (1900s) Imprensa 3 (1500s) TV 2 (1950s) 1
    16. 16. 7a. Mídia de Massa Rádio (1920s) 6 Cinema (1910s) 5 Gravadoras 4 (1900s) Internet Imprensa 3 (1990s) (1500s) TV 2 (1950s) 1
    17. 17. 7a. Mídia de Massa 7 Rádio (1920s) 6 Cinema (1910s) 5 Mídia móvel Gravadoras (2000s) 4 (1900s) Internet Imprensa 3 (1990s) (1500s) TV 2 (1950s) 1
    18. 18. 7 benefícios únicos
    19. 19. 7 benefícios únicos 1. 1o. canal de mídia pessoal
    20. 20. 7 benefícios únicos 1. 1o. canal de mídia pessoal 2. permanentemente em mãos
    21. 21. 7 benefícios únicos 1. 1o. canal de mídia pessoal 2. permanentemente em mãos 3. sempre ligado
    22. 22. 7 benefícios únicos 1. 1o. canal de mídia pessoal 2. permanentemente em mãos 3. sempre ligado 4. canal de pagamento incorporado
    23. 23. 7 benefícios únicos 1. 1o. canal de mídia pessoal 2. permanentemente em mãos 3. sempre ligado 4. canal de pagamento incorporado 5. possibilida geração de conteúdo personalizado
    24. 24. 7 benefícios únicos 1. 1o. canal de mídia pessoal 2. permanentemente em mãos 3. sempre ligado 4. canal de pagamento incorporado 5. possibilida geração de conteúdo personalizado 6. informação de audiência quase perfeito
    25. 25. 7 benefícios únicos 1. 1o. canal de mídia pessoal 2. permanentemente em mãos 3. sempre ligado 4. canal de pagamento incorporado 5. possibilida geração de conteúdo personalizado 6. informação de audiência quase perfeito 7. captura contexto social no consumo de mídia
    26. 26. Revolução iPhone Média Voz SMS Usuário iPhone Email Música Jogos Internet Outros Fonte: iSupply Consumer Trak, 10/08, Morgan Stanley Research
    27. 27. Revolução iPhone 3% 3% 3% 2% 4% 15% 70% Média Voz SMS Usuário iPhone Email Música Jogos Internet Outros Fonte: iSupply Consumer Trak, 10/08, Morgan Stanley Research
    28. 28. Revolução iPhone 3% 3% 3% 9% 3% 2% 4% 8% 15% 10% 45% 12% 70% 14% Média Voz SMS Usuário iPhone Email Música Jogos Internet Outros Fonte: iSupply Consumer Trak, 10/08, Morgan Stanley Research
    29. 29. iPhone App Store
    30. 30. iPhone App Store Julho 2008 Maio 2009 Apps 500 +40000 Downloads 0 +1 bilhão
    31. 31. Batalha de plataformas Nokia RIM Apple HTC Fujitsu Outros Symbian RIM iPhone OS Fonte: Gartner, May 2009
    32. 32. Batalha de plataformas Smartphones 1QY09 19% 4% 41% 5% 11% 20% Nokia RIM Apple HTC Fujitsu Outros Symbian RIM iPhone OS Fonte: Gartner, May 2009
    33. 33. Batalha de plataformas Smartphones 1QY09 60 % 45 % 19% 4% 41% 30 % 5% 11% 15 % 20% 0% 1QY08 1QY09 Nokia RIM Apple HTC Fujitsu Outros Symbian RIM iPhone OS Fonte: Gartner, May 2009
    34. 34. Batalha de plataformas Smartphones 1QY09 60 % 56.9 45 % 49.3 19% 4% 41% 30 % 5% 11% 15 % 19.9 20% 13.3 10.8 0 % 5.3 1QY08 1QY09 Nokia RIM Apple HTC Fujitsu Outros Symbian RIM iPhone OS Fonte: Gartner, May 2009
    35. 35. Consumo móvel de informação Diário Semanal Mensal Fonte: comScore, Inc., TomiAhonen Consulting
    36. 36. Consumo móvel de informação Usuários únicos móveis, EUA (em 1,000) 63.2 M em Jan 2009 70,000 56,000 42,000 28,000 14,000 Jan 2008 0 Jan 2009 Diário Semanal Mensal Fonte: comScore, Inc., TomiAhonen Consulting
    37. 37. Consumo móvel de informação Usuários únicos móveis, EUA (em 1,000) 63.2 M em Jan 2009 70,000 22,4 M diariamente 56,000 42,000 28,000 14,000 Jan 2008 0 Jan 2009 Diário Semanal Mensal Fonte: comScore, Inc., TomiAhonen Consulting
    38. 38. Consumo móvel de informação Usuários únicos móveis, EUA (em 1,000) 63.2 M em Jan 2009 70,000 22,4 M diariamente 56,000 42,000 22,3 M via apps 28,000 14,000 Jan 2008 0 Jan 2009 Diário Semanal Mensal Fonte: comScore, Inc., TomiAhonen Consulting
    39. 39. Consumo móvel de informação Usuários únicos móveis, EUA (em 1,000) 63.2 M em Jan 2009 70,000 22,4 M diariamente 56,000 42,000 22,3 M via apps 28,000 14,000 globalmente17% pagam Jan 2008 0 Jan 2009 Diário Semanal Mensal Fonte: comScore, Inc., TomiAhonen Consulting
    40. 40. Consumo móvel de informação Usuários únicos móveis, EUA (em 1,000) 63.2 M em Jan 2009 70,000 22,4 M diariamente 56,000 42,000 22,3 M via apps 28,000 14,000 globalmente17% pagam Jan 2008 0 Jan 2009 Ásia 30% + que assinantes Diário Semanal Mensal Fonte: comScore, Inc., TomiAhonen Consulting
    41. 41. Onde há conteúdo... Crescimento Receita Fonte: eMarketer, GfK
    42. 42. Onde há conteúdo... ...há propaganda Gasto publicidade móvel, EUA 70% $4,000.00 52.5% $3,000.00 35% $2,000.00 17.5% $1,000.00 0% $0 ‘08 ‘09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 ‘13 Crescimento Receita Fonte: eMarketer, GfK
    43. 43. Onde há conteúdo... ...há propaganda Gasto publicidade móvel, EUA estágio inicial 70% $4,000.00 52.5% $3,000.00 35% $2,000.00 17.5% $1,000.00 0% $0 ‘08 ‘09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 ‘13 Crescimento Receita Fonte: eMarketer, GfK
    44. 44. Onde há conteúdo... ...há propaganda Gasto publicidade móvel, EUA estágio inicial 70% $4,000.00 aumento planejado: 75% 52.5% $3,000.00 35% $2,000.00 17.5% $1,000.00 0% $0 ‘08 ‘09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 ‘13 Crescimento Receita Fonte: eMarketer, GfK
    45. 45. Onde há conteúdo... ...há propaganda Gasto publicidade móvel, EUA estágio inicial 70% $4,000.00 aumento planejado: 75% 52.5% $3,000.00 35% $2,000.00 17.5% $1,000.00 0% $0 ‘08 ‘09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 ‘13 Crescimento Receita Fonte: eMarketer, GfK
    46. 46. Onde há conteúdo... ...há propaganda Gasto publicidade móvel, EUA estágio inicial 70% $4,000.00 aumento planejado: 75% 52.5% $3,000.00 35% $2,000.00 conversão 1 em 7 17.5% $1,000.00 0% $0 ‘08 ‘09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 ‘13 Crescimento Receita Fonte: eMarketer, GfK
    47. 47. Onde há conteúdo... ...há propaganda Gasto publicidade móvel, EUA estágio inicial 70% $4,000.00 aumento planejado: 75% 52.5% $3,000.00 35% $2,000.00 conversão 1 em 7 17.5% $1,000.00 CTR {2%, 20%} 0% $0 ‘08 ‘09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 ‘13 Crescimento Receita Fonte: eMarketer, GfK
    48. 48. Onde há conteúdo... ...há propaganda Gasto publicidade móvel, EUA estágio inicial 70% $4,000.00 aumento planejado: 75% 52.5% $3,000.00 35% $2,000.00 conversão 1 em 7 17.5% $1,000.00 CTR {2%, 20%} 0% $0 ‘08 ‘09 ‘10 ‘11 ‘12 ‘13 Crescimento Receita Fonte: eMarketer, GfK
    49. 49. Entrega e acesso de Conteúdo
    50. 50. Entrega e acesso de Conteúdo • SMS • MMS • Video/Audio Streaming • WAP/WEB • RSS • Aplicações Nativas • Notificações
    51. 51. FOXNews • WAP/WEB • Versão do site para iPhone/iPod • Streaming de video • Alertas de texto (SMS) • App/Notificação para Blackberry
    52. 52. NY Times • WAP/WEB • Versão do site para iPhone/iPod • Aplicação para iPhone/iPod • Location Awareness • Notificações • Podcasts
    53. 53. The Wall Street Journal • WAP/WEB • Aplicação para iPhone/iPod • Aplicação para Blackberry • Notificações e alertas do Mercado de Ações • Podcasts
    54. 54. BBC’s Radio Times Principal guia britânico de TV, rádio e filmes/cinema. Aplicação para iPhone/iPod para acessar o guia.
    55. 55. The Weather Channel Aplicação “Location-aware” de acesso, em tempo real, à informações meteorológicas.
    56. 56. Informação de Tráfego Aplicação “Location-aware” de acesso, em tempo real, à informações de tráfego.
    57. 57. Associated Press • Versão do site para iPhone/iPod • Aplicação para iPhone/iPod • Notificações
    58. 58. Aspectos Sociais e Colaborativos • Conteúdo “gerado” por usuários • Qualificação de conteúdo por usuários • Conhecimento dos perfis dos usuários • Distribuição de conteúdo direcionado • Redes Sociais como fonte de informação
    59. 59. Conectividade Provedor de Conteúdo - “Aplicação Inteligente” iPhone BlackBerry Nokia Outro
    60. 60. eBooks - Leitores Digitais
    61. 61. Leitores Digitais • Amazon’s Kindle, Kindle 2, Kindle DX • Plastic Logic • Papyrus • Sony Reader • Readius
    62. 62. Faixa-etária de usuários do Kindle até 17 18-34 34-54 55 e acima
    63. 63. Faixa-etária de usuários do Kindle até 17 18-34 34-54 55 e acima 37% 38% 2% 22%
    64. 64. Obrigado! Perguntas? Rodrigo Mazzilli - rodrigo@wellknown.as @rodmaz Rodrigo Kochenburger - divoxx@wellknown.as @divoxx

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