• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Lessons Learned from the Walking Security Index (WSI) Project on How to Achieve Street-Smart Urban Transportation Improvements
 

Lessons Learned from the Walking Security Index (WSI) Project on How to Achieve Street-Smart Urban Transportation Improvements

on

  • 2,015 views

The purpose of this paper is to discuss several of the lessons learned from the Walking Security Index (WSI) project that may be helpful to other localities involved in WSI-related concerns or issues. ...

The purpose of this paper is to discuss several of the lessons learned from the Walking Security Index (WSI) project that may be helpful to other localities involved in WSI-related concerns or issues. We refer to those lessons learned as key strategic and tactical decision points which affect:
1)defining urban ansportation “improvements” as interventions or initiatives that serve the expressed needs of pedestrians; and
2)achieving urban urban transportation “improvements” that can be justified as street smart (rather than street stupid) because they actively support walking, walking-cycling, and walking-transit trips as sustainable alternatives to the non-sustainable, car-based mode of transportation that currently prevails in Canadian cities.

For this presentation the decision points selected for discussion are:
1.Establishing citizens as experts in the variable specification phase of index design.
2.Defining “improvements” in terms of impacts on pedestrians’ safety, comfort, convenience that result from changes to transportation policies, regulations, infrastructure, etc.
3.Defining “street smart” in terms of how well measures and procedures used by planners, traffic engineers, law enforcement officers and other professionals have actual, operational regard for pedestrians’ needs and capabilities.
4.Constructing index formulations that are valid and simple, and are built on existing or easy-to-acquire data, in order to satisfy the degree of difficulty and data availability criteria used in tests for operationality.
5.Adopting and applying Pedestrian Impact Assessment (PIA) principles in development, infrastructure, planning, zoning or other decisions and actions that affect pedestrians’ safety, comfort and convenience.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,015
Views on SlideShare
2,013
Embed Views
2

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
29
Comments
0

1 Embed 2

http://www.slideshare.net 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Lessons Learned from the Walking Security Index (WSI) Project on How to Achieve Street-Smart Urban Transportation Improvements Lessons Learned from the Walking Security Index (WSI) Project on How to Achieve Street-Smart Urban Transportation Improvements Presentation Transcript

    • Slides for Lessons Learned from the Walking Security Index (WSI) Project on How to Achieve Street- Smart Urban Transportation Improvements by Professor Barry Wellar, Department of Geography, University of Ottawa Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 Canada Presented at the session, Pedestrians, Transit and Liveability Annual Planning Conference, Canadian Institute of Planners Vancouver, BC May 26-29, 2002
    • Walking Security Index Design Publications* 1. Design and Pre-Testing of a Survey Instrument to Measure Pedestrian Levels of Safety and Comfort: A Case Study of the Channelized Cut-Off from Laurier Avenue East to Nicholas Street South, Ottawa, Ontario. 2. Walking Security Index Project: Literature Search, Outreach and Research Design Activities. 3. Perspectives on Pedestrian Safety. 4. Findings from a Field Re-Survey of the Laurier and Nicholas Cut-Off Channel (E-S), and Implications for the Walking Security Index. 5. Capability of IS/GIS-Based Intersection Applications to Implement the Walking Security Index (WSI): A Preliminary Status and Prospect Assessment. 6. Safety, Comfort, and Convenience as Principal Components of the Walking Security Index: Initial Specification. 7. Walking Security Index Variables: Initial Specification. 8. Walking Security Index. 9. Newspapers as a Source of Fact and Opinion on Pedestrians’ Safety, Comfort, Convenience: A Keyword-Based Literature Search and Review. *Contact person/address for information on WSI design reports: Barry Wellar <wellarb@uottawa.ca> 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 1
    • Walking Security Index Open Literature Publications 1. “Pedestrian Perspectives on Intersection Performance: A Case Study Report on Channelization”, Barry Wellar, in 1996 URISA Proceedings, pp. 181-201. 2. quot;Measuring Pedestrian Safety: A Report on the Walking Security Index (WSI) Project,quot; Barry Wellar, in Perspectives on Pedestrian Safety. B. Wellar, ed. Ottawa: Pedestrian Safety Conference Committee, Region of Ottawa-Carleton, 36-44,1996. 3. quot;The Walking Security Index: Demonstration of Roadway, Traffic and Human Factors Affecting Index Design Testing and Use,quot; Barry Wellar, in Perspectives on Pedestrian Safety. B. Wellar, ed. Ottawa: Pedestrian Safety Conference Committee, Region of Ottawa-Carleton, 69-75, 1996. 4. “Integrating Intersection Feature and Performance Data Using the Walking Security Index Model”, Barry Wellar and Jason Soroko, in 1997 URISA Proceedings (CD- ROM). <www.urisa.org> 5. “Combining Client-Driven and Curiosity-Driven Research in Graduate Programs in Geography: Some Lessons Learned and Suggestions for Making Connections”, Barry Wellar, in 1998 Papers and Proceedings of the Applied Geography Conferences, pp. 213-220. 6. “Strategies Behind Using Client-Driven Research on the Walking Security Index (WSI) to Connect Ontology, Epistemology and Praxis in Undergraduate Courses”, Barry Wellar, in 1998 Papers and Proceedings of the Applied Geography Conferences, pp. 161-169. 7. “Walking Security Index Project”, Barry Wellar, in Abstracts, 1998 Conference of the Association of American Geographers. <www.aag.org> 8. “The Walking Security Index (WSI) as a Means of Harmonizing Transportation and Community Goals”, Barry Wellar and Grant Malinsky, in 1998 Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Transportation Association of Canada. 9. Region of Ottawa-Carleton. Departmental Recommendations on Walking Security Index. File No. 50 20-98-0101. Ottawa: Region of Ottawa-Carleton, Environment and Transportation Department, 1998. 10. “Moving Research from Concepts to Operations: Comments on Contract Negotiations for the Walking Security Index (WSI) Pilot Study”, Barry Wellar, in 1999 Papers and Proceedings of the Applied Geography Conferences, pp. 11-19. 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002
    • Walking Security Index Open Literature Publications 11. Region of Ottawa-Carleton. Departmental Recommendations on Walking Security Index. File No. 50 20-99-0101. Ottawa: Region of Ottawa-Carleton, Environment and Transportation Department, 1999. 12. Region of Ottawa-Carleton. Transportation Committee Minutes, 21 April 1999. Ottawa: Region of Ottawa-Carleton, Office of the Regional Clerk, 1999. 13. Region of Ottawa-Carleton. Regional Council Minutes, 28 April 1999. Ottawa: Region of Ottawa-Carleton, Office of the Regional Clerk, 1999. 14. “Field Tests of the Driver Behaviour Index (DBI) Survey Forms: Initial Findings from an Applied Geography Project Involving Selected Regional Intersections in Ottawa- Carleton”, Barry Wellar and Catherine Vandermuelen, in 2000 Papers and Proceedings of the Applied Geography Conferences, pp. 206-214. 15. “Spatial Factors Affecting Implementation of the Walking Security Index (WSI): Initial Pilot Study Findings”, Barry Wellar, in Abstracts, 2000 Conference of the Association of American Geographers. <www.aag.org> 16. Wellar, B. The Pilot Study as a Step in the Process of Implementing Transportation Innovations: Findings from the Walking Security Index (WSI) Project”, in Papers and Proceedings of the Applied Geography Conferences. G. Tobin, B. Montz, F. Schoolmaster, editors: Denton:TX University of North Texas, Vol. 24, 2001, 243-252. 17. “Walking Security Index Pilot Study: Geography as a Factor Affecting Pedestrians’ Safety, Comfort, Convenience at Intersections”, Barry Wellar, in Abstracts, 2001 Conference of the Association of American Geographers. <www.aag.org> 18. Wellar, B. “Strategies for Designing Applications to Implement Walking Security Indexes”, in 2001 URISA Proceedings, (CD-ROM). <www.urisa.org> 19. Wellar, B. “Overview of the Walking Security Index Pilot Study”, in Transportation and Transit Committee Minutes, 07 November 2001. Ottawa: City of Ottawa, Office of the Clerk, 2001. The materials may be viewed at: http://www.city.ottawa.on.ca/calendar/ottawa/citycouncil/ttc/2001/11-07/minutes15.htm 20. “Implications of the Walking Security Index (WSI) Pilot Study for Urban Transportation Programs”, Barry Wellar, in Abstracts, 2002 Conference of the Association of American Geographers. <www.aag.org> 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 3
    • Walking Security Index Pilot Study Publications 1. Walking Security Index Pilot Study: Basic Walking Security Index Component. 2. Walking Security Index Pilot Study: Basic Walking Security Index Component - Technical Supplement. 3. Walking Security Index Pilot Study: Quality of Intersection Condition Component. 4. Walking Security Index Pilot Study: Quality of Intersection Condition Component - Technical Supplement. 5. Walking Security Index Pilot Study: Driver Behaviour Index Component. 6. Walking Security Index Pilot Study: Driver Behaviour Index Component - Technical Supplement. . 7. Walking Security Index Pilot Study Report *Contact person for information on WSI pilot study reports: Daphne Hope <daphne.hope@city.ottawa.on.ca> 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 4
    • Decision Point “The term ‘decision point’ is used in this paper to refer to a situation that involves making a choice between or among alternatives.” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 5
    • Citizen Experts “The essential truth about how well citizens’ expectations are being met in regard to safety, comfort, convenience is measured by how they feel when entering, traversing or leaving an intersection.” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 6
    • Citizen Experts “The decision to directly involve citizens in the design and pilot study phases of the WSI project significantly enhanced both the processes and products of the research.” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 7
    • “Improvements” “In our experience about 95% of the references to ‘improvements’ in the field of urban transportation focus on moving cars and trucks, and about 99% of those references do not define what is meant by ‘improvements’. ” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 8
    • Intersection Volume and Design Index (IVDI) IVDI = V1 • V2 • V3 • V4 • V 5 • V6 • V7 • V8 where, number of passenger car equivalents2/hour V1 = V2 = number of pedestrians/hour V3 = number of lanes rating V4 = number of turn lanes by type rating V5 = intersection geometry rating V6 = intersection slope rating V7 = direction(s) of traffic flow rating V8 = number of channels adjacent to intersection rating 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 9
    • Quality of Intersection Condition Index (QICI) ID Variable Names for Condition Met Intersection Design and No (Quadrant) Maintenance Features Yes NW NE SE SW 1 Sidewalk corner capacity 2 Height of curbing 3 Condition of curbing 4 Sidewalk width capacity 5 Sidewalk condition 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 10-A
    • Quality of Intersection Condition Index (QICI) ID Variable Names for Condition Met Intersection Design and No (Quadrant) Maintenance Features Yes NW NE SE SW Crosswalk surface condition 6 7 Median (refuge) capacity 8 Median (refuge) condition 9 Traffic calmer(s) 10 Channel island (refuge) capacity 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 10-B
    • Quality of Intersection Condition Index (QICI) ID Variable Names for Condition Met Intersection Design and No (Quadrant) Maintenance Features Yes NW NE SE SW 11 Crosswalk capacity 12 Crosswalk signed and painted 13 Stop bar signed and painted 14 Pedestrian signage 15 No sight line obstruction 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 10-C
    • Quality of Intersection Condition Index (QICI) ID Variable Names for Condition Met Intersection Design and No (Quadrant) Maintenance Features Yes NW NE SE SW 16 Street furniture proximal to corner 17 Ice/snow/slush removal 18 Water Drainage Totals Overall Score (Yes-No=) 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 10-D
    • Driver Behaviour Index (DBI) Driver Behaviour Index = ALI + RLI + FTYI P P P where, ALI = amber-light incidents per phase P RLI = red-light incidents per phase P FTYI = fail-to-yield incidents per phase P 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 11
    • “Improvements” “It is our finding from explicitly dealing with variables, and rejecting the vague notion of so-called improvements, that the case for pedestrians’ security becomes more transparent, … and leaves little in the way of “wriggle room” for inaction.” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 12
    • “Street Smart” “The more that a municipality enhances pedestrians’ safety, comfort, and convenience, and the share of pedestrian trips among total trips, the more that municipality can justifiably be called a street-smart place.” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 13
    • Keep Indexes Simple “Degree of difficulty and data availability criteria were designed into the WSI project as study parameters.” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 14
    • Keep Indexes Simple “Our finding is that all the indexes are understandable by members of all expert groups (citizens, elected officials, professional staff), and indications are that engaging them in a strategic manner was a critical feature in achieving such a high level of index acceptance.” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 15
    • Pedestrian Impact Assessment Principles “The City of Ottawa recognizes the pedestrian mode of transport as the highest priority, and for good reason: It is the most sustainable mode of transport; 1. Achieving sustainable transport is key to 2. achieving urban sustainability; Lack of due regard for sustainability flies full in 3. the face of any (reputable) definition of ‘smart growth’.” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 16
    • Pedestrian Impact Assessment Principles “The time is long overdue for the City of Ottawa, and by extension other municipalities, to develop and adopt a body of principles which ensure that urban transportation policies, plans and programs are designed and implemented in order to serve and promote pedestrians’ safety, comfort, convenience” 02/05/26-29 B. Wellar, CIP 2002 Slide 17