Before & After Project Ed 546 & 548

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Before & After Project Ed 546 & 548

  1. 1. Before & After Project From the Mind of a Music Teacher Kelli Weisenhorn Adams State College Dr. Joyce & Dr. Wenzel ED 546 & 548 CIA Summer 2009
  2. 2. Texts Referenced (for guidelines & principles) • E-Learning by Design (EBD), Horton • Deciding What to Teach and Test (DWTT), English • e-Learning and the Science of Instruction (ESI), Clark & Mayer • Graphics for Learning (GFL), Clark & Lyons
  3. 3. Project Objectives Objective 1: Deciding What to Teach and Test (DWTT), English For any body of content to be synchronously and/or asynchronously instructed and assessed, you will apply curriculum design and delivery guidelines to: * Ensure that your classroom level written, taught, and tested curricula are well-aligned; * Support discussions of curriculum alignment at the building and district-wide levels.
  4. 4. Project Objectives Objective 2: e-Learning and the Science of Instruction (ESI), Clark & Mayer For any body of content to be synchronously and/or asynchronously instructed and assessed, you will apply evidence-based principles of multimedia learning to ensure: * Optimal use of spoken and written words with visuals; * Effective use of narration to describe visuals; * Appropriate design of examples and practice that build new skills; and * Effective instructional design that minimizes cognitive load.
  5. 5. Project Objectives Objective 3: Graphics for Learning (GFL), Clark & Lyons For any body of content to be synchronously and/or asynchronously instructed and assessed, you will apply evidence-based principles to ensure that the visual elements of instruction: * Support and leverage psychological processes of learning (attention, prior knowledge, working memory, mental models, transfer of learning and motivation); * Accommodate learner differences; and * Are well-differentiated for **types of content (fact, concept, process, procedure, principle) ** level of performance assessment (remember or apply), and the ** focus of performance (accuracy, fluency, and/or complexity).
  6. 6. Project Objectives Objective 4: E-Learning by Design (EBD), Horton For any body of content to be synchronously and/or asynchronously instructed and assessed, you will design standards-based instruction that: * Uses primary and supporting learning objects; and * Completely accomplishes primary and supporting performance objectives.
  7. 7. Message from the Conductor The following project will rather, sample lessons from two demonstrate how e-learning different units. Peer coaching objectives, from the referenced tips and helpful information texts, have been applied to will also be included to provide previous lessons from my useful knowledge for teaching career. Entire units professional growth. will not be presented, but
  8. 8. Instrument Recognition Unit • Topic: How an instrument is played (technique & posture) can change the sound that is produced. • Age Group: Beginning Band • Objectives: Students will identify instruments through sound quality attributed to technique and posture. • Lessons/Activities: Lesson Preview, Techniques and Posture Lesson, Audio Activity • Assessments: Pretest & Posttest
  9. 9. Instrument Recognition Unit Before After • Lesson was planned first and then • Goals were set, assessments ending assessment was planned--no created according to goal, lessons curriculum alignment (lacking were created to teach to the goal-- objective 1). curriculum alignment (objective 1). • Incorrect answers to work and • Incorrect answers are marked with assessments are marked (lacking an explanation/feedback placed in objective 2). alignment with the student’s answer (objective 2). • Poster visuals were used to • Poster visuals continue to be used. demonstrate proper posture when However, text that explains the holding an instrument. No text way to achieve proper posture and accompanied the poster (lacking it’s effects now takes it’s place on objective 3). the poster next to the picture. In addition, there are arrows cueing the learner to make connections between the poster and text (objective 3).
  10. 10. Instrument Recognition Unit (cont.) Before After • Lecture on posture and technique • Teacher demonstration of Concert and the effects on sound production Bb scale with proper posture and (lacking objective 4). technique vs. poor posture and technique (Absorb). Learners attempt scale with proper posture and technique (Do). Record the scale and compare to an earlier recording to evaluate the improvement (Connect) (objective 4).
  11. 11. Mood Unit • Topic: Different moods are portrayed in music. • Age Group: Upper Elementary • Objectives: Students will identify different moods within a piece of music, as well as the elements that create the various moods. • Lessons/Activities: Lesson Preview, Mood Lesson, Assessment • Assessments: Worksheet, Coloring Graphs, Art Work, Performance Assessment
  12. 12. Mood Unit Before After • I created lessons first followed by • Goals were set, assessments ending assessments--no curriculum created according to the goals, alignment (lacking objective 1). lessons were created to teach to the goals--curriculum alignment via • Answers on the coloring graph backloading (objective 1). were marked as incorrect or correct • Answers on the coloring graph without feedback (lacking were marked as incorrect or objective 2). correct. Not only is positive feedback given, but placement is key as it is written next to each incorrect answer (objective 2).
  13. 13. Mood Unit (cont.) Before After • Vocabulary and teacher • Nonexamples and analogies are demonstration were used to instruct used to teach more abstract ideas of learners on how to identify mood mood within a song (objective 3). within a song (lacking objective 3). • Explanations about what mood • Explanations of what mood drawings are and how to create one drawings are and how to create one were given (lacking objective 4). are given. I give a teacher demonstration on how to create a mood drawing (Absorb). Learners create their personal mood drawings (Do). Learners share mood drawings and musical elements that inspired the drawings (Connect)(objective 4).
  14. 14. Peer Professional Development Tips • Objective 1 Tips: Make sure that your curriculum is aligned. Alignment should not just happen in a classroom, but throughout the building as well. However, make sure to discuss with your building ways that you can align curriculum in your building. – Form PD teams to ensure alignment – Discuss whether backloading and backward design – Backloading and backward design begin with the goal, followed by creating the assessment, and finally lessons to teach what will be assessed. – Make sure curriculum is aligned vertically and horizontally. – Align within a district to avoid gaps between major milestones such as transitioning from elementary to junior high.
  15. 15. Peer Professional Development Tips (cont.) • Objective 2 Tips: Examples are one of the most powerful methods of building cognitive skills. Worked Examples provide a step-by-step way of building skills and new knowledge without causing cognitive overload. – Fading: begins with a fully worked example and then progresses step-by- step, with the learner completing a new step each time. Eventually the learner transitions to a full practice problem. – Make sure to use visuals that are relevant – Place text close to visual – Group steps into meaningful chunks with visuals to draw attention. – Coherence Principle: less is more; distraction-free environment – Contiguity Principle: use of color, font, & placement for feedback
  16. 16. Peer Professional Development Tips (cont.) • Objective 3 Tips: Graphics/visuals are an integral part of learning. Here are some tips to successfully incorporate visuals in ways that are most beneficial to the learning process. – Use cueing to draw attention – Visualize concepts and facts – Provide demonstrations that provide transformation and representational visuals – Text plus representational or interpretive visuals provides a better understanding – Use visuals to manage cognitive load • direct attention • memory support • place text close to visuals (same page vs. separate pages) • eliminate extraneous detail • use diagrams to illustrate instructions
  17. 17. Peer Professional Development Tips (cont.) • Objective 4 Tips: Here is some important information regarding lessons, topics, and tests. – Combine learning activities for effective lessons and a richer learning experience – Design a lesson as a learning object – Tutorials can organize lessons – The function of a topic to to FULLY accomplish a learning objective – Topics can be simple, typical, or complex and address: • Absorb: learners watch a demonstration • Do: learners “do” the demonstrated activity • Connect: learners make a knowledge building connection
  18. 18. Peer Professional Development Tips (cont.) • Objective 4 continued: – Testing: • Why? What do you want to accomplish? • What type of questions do you want to use (multiple choice, true/false, essay, etc.)? • Write effective questions; be simple and straightforward; no trickery • Group questions appropriately (sequencing, etc.) • Provide meaningful feedback • Explaining the test prepares learners and gives them a sense of control • Consider alternatives to formal tests
  19. 19. Conclusion Please take the time to study the objectives that have been presented. Learn to incorporate them into your lessons. It is our job as educators to make sure that we present information in the most beneficial way to students. It is my hope that you will find something of value in this presentation and use it to impact the lives of your learners.

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