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Design Approach for Behavior Change Worksheet
 

Design Approach for Behavior Change Worksheet

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Created by Nedra Kline Weinreich ...

Created by Nedra Kline Weinreich
Weinreich Communications
www.social-marketing.com

Worksheet based on concepts from the Design With Intent Toolkit v.0.9 by Dan Lockton, David Harrison and Neville A. Stanton
Download the toolkit here: www.designwithintent.co.uk

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    Design Approach for Behavior Change Worksheet Design Approach for Behavior Change Worksheet Document Transcript

    • Applying the Design Approach for Behavior Change 1. What is the specific behavior you would like to influence? 2. Who exactly should be doing the behavior (be as specific as possible)? 3. Architectural Design: a. How can you use positioning or layout elements to either encourage or constrain the behavior? b. How can you make it more comfortable for people to do the behavior? 4. Errorproofing Design: a. How can you make the desired behavior be the default? Created by Nedra Kline Weinreich, Weinreich Communications, www.social-marketing.com. Worksheet based on concepts from the Design With Intent Toolkit v.0.9 by Dan Lockton, David Harrison and Neville A. Stanton, www.designwithintent.co.uk. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.
    • b. How can you force the behavior as a necessary step in another desirable process? 5. Persuasive Design: a. How can you show the actual effect of the behavior on the overall system for self-monitoring? b. How can you provide a cue to action at the appropriate time? 6. Visual Design: a. How can you make the “right choice” or the cue to action more visible? b. How can you use a metaphor of something your users are already familiar with to help them understand how or when to perform the desired behavior? 2
    • 7. Cognitive Design: a. How can you demonstrate social proof that others are successfully engaging in the behavior? b. How can you frame the behavior or the benefits of the behavior in a way that helps people see it in a more positive light? 8. Security Design: a. How can you encourage people to do the desired behavior if they think people are watching? b. How can you use sensory effects (e.g., sound, smell, light, taste) to encourage the desired behavior? 3