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Introductions and conclusions
Introductions and conclusions
Introductions and conclusions
Introductions and conclusions
Introductions and conclusions
Introductions and conclusions
Introductions and conclusions
Introductions and conclusions
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Introductions and conclusions

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  • 1. Introductions/Con clusion
  • 2. The Five Paragraph Essay Although dangerous martial arts beneficial because they teach discipline, patience, and character.
  • 3. The Five Paragraph Essay In defense of the 5 paragraph essay Ill Effects of the Five Paragraph theme The length of your essay—the number of paragraphs, the sentences in each paragraph, etc—depends on the audience. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that essays should only be five paragraphs long. Even if you list three points in your thesis, you may need 20 paragraphs to explain those three points.
  • 4. Strategies for Introductions Controversial statement Rhetorical Question Story or anecdote Startling statistic Statement of popular opinion that is contradicted or shown to be untrue Comparison or analogy Rhetorical Devices: poetic, repetition, anticipation, emphasis
  • 5. Introductions Scan some website, news sites, blogs, etc., and look for an article with an engaging introduction. What makes it engaging? Why do you want to read it?
  • 6. Where Does the THESIS STATEMENT Go?
  • 7. Strategies for Conclusion Aristotle, in The Rhetoric, tells us a good writer should do this in the conclusion: "make the audience well-disposed towards ourselves and ill-disposed to our opponent." Go beyond restating and/or summarizing. One way to achieve this is to explain the benefits if the audience accepts our view. • It's a good opportunity to make inferences or predictions. • Ask the audience to consider what would happen if they don’t accept our point of view. • Make a connection to society in general, the bigger picture, the human condition.

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