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Integrated Civil Rights Unit

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  • 1. Final Project: The Civil Rights Movement Integrated Unit Corine Wegley, CI 410
  • 2. Introduction and Overview
  • 3. Purpose and Rationale This unit is designed for 7th grade students to learn about and explore the Civil Rights Movement in the United States with a goal of developing empathy for different groups. Civil rights is an ongoing issue that people should be aware about and have an understanding of the need for equality for all. The Civil Rights Movement is a great way for students to explore these rights and understand what groups of people went through to strive for their rights. The goal is that students will empathize with those who are marginalized and to understand their role in striving to end discrimination. After completing this unit, students will be able to empathize more with the ongoing struggle for basic freedoms.
  • 4. Illinois State Standards 1.C.3c Compare, contrast and evaluate ideas and information from various sources and genres. 1.C.3d Summarize and make generalizations from content and relate them to the purpose of the material. 2.B.3a Respond to literary material from personal, creative and critical points of view. 3.A.3 Write compositions that contain complete sentences and effective paragraphs using English conven­ tions. 3.B.3a Produce documents that convey a clear understanding and interpretation of ideas and information and display focus, organization, elaboration and coherence. 3.C.3b Using available technology, produce compositions and multimedia works for specified audiences. 4.A.3a Demonstrate ways (e.g., ask probing questions, provide feedback to a speaker, summarize and paraphrase complex spoken messages) that listening attentively can improve comprehension. 4.B.3a Deliver planned oral presentations, using language and vocabulary appropriate to the purpose, message and audience; provide details and supporting information that clarify main ideas; and use visual aids and contemporary technology as support. 4.B.3b Design and produce reports and multi-media compositions that represent group projects. 5.A.3a Identify appropriate resources to solve problems or answer questions through research. 5.B.3a Choose and analyze information sources for individual, academic and functional purposes. 5.B.3b Identify, evaluate and cite primary sources. 5.C.3a Plan, compose, edit and revise docu­ments that synthesize new meaning gleaned from multiple sources.
  • 5. Illinois State Standards (Cont.) 5.C.3b Prepare and orally present original work (e.g., poems, monologues, reports, plays, stories) supported by research. 5.C.3c Take notes, conduct interviews, organize and report information in oral, visual and electronic formats. 14.C.3 Compare historical issues involving rights, roles and status of individuals in relation to municipalities, states and the nation. 16.D.3 (W) Identify the origins and analyze consequences of events that have shaped world social history including famines, migrations, plagues, slave trading. 17.A.3b Explain how to make and use geo­graphic representations to provide and enhance spatial information including maps, graphs, charts, models, aerial photographs, satellite images. 17.C.3a Explain how human activity is affected by geographic factors. 18.C.3a Describe ways in which a diverse U.S. population has developed and maintained common beliefs (e.g., life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; the Constitution and the Bill of Rights). 18.C.3b Explain how diverse groups have contributed to U.S. social systems over time. 26.B.3b Drama: Demonstrate storytelling, improvising and memorizing scripted material supported by simple aural and visual effects and personal background knowledge needed to create and perform in drama/theatre. 26.B.3c Music: Sing or play with expression and accuracy a variety of music representing diverse cultures and styles. 26.B.3d Visual Arts: Demonstrate knowledge and skills to create 2- and 3-dimensional works and time arts (e.g., film, animation, video) that are realistic, abstract, functional and decorative.
  • 6. Essential Outcomes At the end of this unit, students will be able to:  Explain what the Civil Rights Movement is and its history.  Identify the cause and effect relationship of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.  Draw conclusions about the consequences, outcomes and impacts of the Civil Rights Movement.  Explain what the responses and solutions were of the Civil Rights Movement.  Explain to and teach their classmates about their specific topic within the Civil Rights Movement.  Research a topic and communicate their findings.  Use a variety of learning techniques and multimedia activities to facilitate learning.  Explore their learning needs through a variety of experiences and opportunities.
  • 7. Concept Map
  • 8. About the Unit The class will be divided into 8 groups of 3. Two groups will be assigned to each subtopic, but they will work on the topic in their separate group of three:  Women’s Rights  African American Rights  American Indian Rights  Mexican American Rights Each group of three will choose three activities from each of the four categories.
  • 9. About the Unit (Cont.) Students will explore each subtopic over the course of five days for one class period per day. The total unit will last for 4 weeks, with one additional week for the introductory activity. Students will engage in a variety of multimedia activities to facilitate learning. Students will engage in group collaboration with opportunities for socialization as well as independent tasks to tackle on their own, with group support as needed. Students will be able to explore their learning needs through a variety of learning experiences and modes of learning. At the end of the unit, each group will present what they have learned to the class. The purpose of having two groups for each topic is that groups will differ in their activity choices.
  • 10. Activities for the Unit
  • 11. Introductory Activity Students will be introduced to the unit by being introduced to diversity and the issue of civil rights for all. After being placed into groups, students will read a fiction book relating to their topic area and about a character about their age experiencing it.  For Women’s Rights:  Maria Takes a Stand: The Battle for Women’s Rights by Norma Jean Lutz  For African American Rights:  A Tugging String: a Novel about Growing up during the Civil Rights Era by David Greenberg  Mississippi Bridge by Mildred D. Taylor (in addition, if extra time – only 62 pages)  For American Indian Rights:  Code Talker by Joseph Bruchac (a longer book than the others. If necessary, students can be asked to skip some of the middle chapters, as long as the first 3 and last 2 are read)  For Mexican American Rights:  Lupita Manana by Patricia Beatty, or  How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent by Julia Alvarez (longer, more challenging book) Students will engage in group discussion periodically while reading this book. Students may have one week to complete their book, and may discuss it during class time during the week before the unit activities begin.
  • 12. About the Civil Rights Movement – Activities Create a timeline of the events of the Civil Rights Movement. Each group member will participate and collaborate. Research about the discrimination of your topic and, as a group, create a list of the discrimination they experienced. Then each group member will write a report about the discrimination they experienced (about 2-3 pages long). Create a poster about the Civil Rights Movement. Include: why it occurred, who it effected, and when it occurred. Each group member will be responsible for part of the poster. Create a newspaper article reporting on a significant event related to your topic (legislation, protests, etc.).
  • 13. About the Civil Rights Movement – Activities (Cont.) Create a biography for a group/person that contributed significantly to your topic during the Civil Rights Movement. Include pictures, captions, relevant information, contributions, etc. Each group member will create their own, although it may be on the same group/person. As a group, go on a Google Earth tour of significant places or landmarks where events for your topic leading to the Civil Rights Movement took place. Description of the event that occurred at that landmark will be described in a pop-up box on Google Earth.
  • 14. Causes of the Civil Rights Movement – Activities Create a poster outlining the causes of the Civil Rights Movement, including what led up to it. Include facts and research. Each group member will be responsible for part of the poster. Create a timeline of events leading up to the Civil Rights Movement. Each group member will participate and collaborate. Create a skit with your group about the events leading up to/causing the Civil Rights Movement for your topic. (For example: events that directly led to the Civil Rights Movement for your topic). Each group member will participate. The skit should be at least 5 minutes long and include accurate information and characters.
  • 15. Causes of the Civil Rights Movement – Activities (Cont.) Create a cause-and-effect graphic organizer about the Civil Rights Movement. This can include photographs and text boxes. The group will collaborate together. Create a collage or creative artistic collection of words reflecting the discrimination that your topic felt that led them to participate in the Civil Rights Movement. Words can reflect the feelings your topic may have felt, the unfairness of the discrimination, why your topic felt the need to strive for their civil rights, etc. Each group member will create their own. Words must be legible and visible, as well as appropriate and well thought- out. Leave as little blank space on the page as possible.
  • 16. Consequences of the Civil Rights Movement - Activities Create a poster outlining how the Civil Rights Movement affected the people in your topic. Each group member should be responsible for part of the poster. Create a collage of images and words relevant to the consequences of the Civil Rights Movement. They can incorporate the negative stereotypes and feelings of those discriminated against, and/or the positive feelings associated with the gains made by the Civil Rights Movement. Then, each group member will write a one-page paper explaining your collage. Create a 1-2 page protest strategy that could have been used for your topic during the Civil Rights Movement. This should include a rationale for why you are protesting, who will be involved, what you are protesting, what protest strategy you will be using, and your rationale for using this strategy. Things to consider: physical vs. verbal strategies, violent vs. nonviolent, boycotting vs. protesting, stationary vs. marching, etc. Each group member should be in charge of at least one portion of the strategy.
  • 17. Consequences of the Civil Rights Movement – Activities (Cont.) Create a diary of a person in your topic that is your age going through the discrimination, protests, events, etc., of the Civil Rights Movement. Each group member should create their own character and create at least 6 diary entries of at least 1 page each. Create a PowerPoint about the consequences of the Civil Rights Movement. Each group member should participate. The PowerPoint can include songs that reflect your group’s attitudes toward the Civil Rights Movement, pictures that reflect your topic in the Civil Rights Movement, etc. The PowerPoint should be at least 10 slides long with at least 3 sentences on each slide. As a group, team up to rewrite the words of a song of your choice. Replace the words with lyrics that reflect and describe the consequences of the Civil Rights Movement. Each student will create a portion of the song. Lyrics may also reflect the feelings of the groups on the consequences. This can be performed for your peers and teachers in person, or recorded!
  • 18. Responses/Solutions to the Civil Rights Movement – Activities Write to your local Congress representative to express your views on an issue you came across in your research that you feel still discriminates against your topic. Each group member will write his or her own 1-2 page letter. Research the legislation that resulted as a consequence of the gains your topic made. In a Venn diagram or comparison chart, compare the new legislation and the rights it provided your topic with to the previous legislation and discrimination. Create your own legislation for rights that your group believes everyone should be granted. This should be thorough and well thought-out; about 2 pages long with at least 3 rights explained. Each group member will be responsible for explaining a right. Have group members sign it to show their support.
  • 19. Responses/Solutions to the Civil Rights Movement – Activities (Cont.) Research about the responses/solutions of the discrimination of your topic and write a short report (2-3 pages). Each group member is responsible for writing his or her own report. Get together with the other group assigned to your topic. Concerning a piece of legislation resulting from your topic, one group will be arguing for the legislation while the other group argues against the legislation. Each group will be given about 30 minutes to prepare their debates and will come prepared to debate in the next class period. The debate must take place for at least 15 minutes, and significant and valid points must be made, with each group member contributing and coming prepared with arguments. As a group, team up to rewrite the words of a song of your choice. Replace the words with lyrics relevant to the responses and solutions that your topic experienced in their strive for civil rights. Lyrics may also reflect what your group feels about the need for equal/civil rights for everyone (maybe as the chorus of your song!). This can be performed for your peers and teachers in person, or recorded!
  • 20. Culminating Activity At the conclusion of the unit, students from each group will share their research, findings, and activities with the class. Each group of students will present and explain their activities to the class. Students in will demonstrate active listening and respect of their peers when groups are presenting, asking questions to clarify and providing constructive feedback when necessary. Since there are two groups assigned to each topic, there should be a broad range of activities presented and a lot of information presented between the two groups. As a result of each group presenting on their topic, the class will learn about all the other topics in addition to their own.
  • 21. Assessment (Alternative) Formal Assessment:  3 Rubrics  Overall Multimedia Project Assessment  Overall multimedia work done by the group  Collaborative Work Skills Assessment  How students worked as a group  Research Project Group Planning Assessment  Assessing the research done by the group
  • 22. Overall Multimedia Project Assessment (See Word File – Couldn’t attach to PowerPoint) Assessed on:  Presentation  Sources  Requirements  Content  Mechanics  Originality  Attractiveness
  • 23. Resources for this Unit - Websites Women’s Movement: http://teacherlink.ed.usu.edu/tlresources/units/Byrnes-famous/JANEADDA.html#back1  Information on Jane Hull with a connection to the fight for homeless (background info) http://www.womeninworldhistory.com/lesson.html  Multi-site resource on a host of Women’s movement information http://www.now.org/history/history.html  National Organization for Women (NOW) - history Mexican American Movement: http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/  Universal declaration of human rights http://www.smithsonianeducation.org/educators/resource_library/hispanic_resources.html  Smithsonian collection of Hispanic rights and struggles http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-08-01/news/chi-quinn-signs-illinois-dream-act-2011  Chicago Tribune Article on Quinn signing the Dream Act http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/ct-met-quinn-dream-act-0802-20110802,0,6506  Chicago Tribune Article on undocumented college students
  • 24. Resources for this Unit – Websites (Cont.) American Indian Movement: http://www.un.org/en/documents/udhr/  Universal declaration of human rights http://www.educationworld.com/a_lesson/TM/WS_nativeamerican_table.shtml  Chart detailing the population of American Indians by year http://www.nativeculturelinks.com/indians.html  American Indian Library Association http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4p2959.html  Indian Removal site http://www.studyworld.com/indian_removal_act_of_1830.htm  Historical overview
  • 25. Resources for this Unit – Websites (Cont.) American Indian Movement (Cont.): http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/historyonline/lesson_plans_display.cfm?lesson  Chronology of events http://www.synaptic.bc.ca/ejournal/jackson.htm  Text of the Indian Removal Act http://www.siskiyous.edu/class/hist7/lecsix.htm  Indian reaction to Act http://www.catawba.k12.nc.us/techtrac/plus/taylor/whos%20who.htm  Game of the major players in the Indian Removal Act http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h3083t.html  Cherokee letter related to Indian Removal
  • 26. Resources for this Unit – Websites (Cont.) African American Movement: http://www.cr.nps.gov/nr/travel/civilrights/  Historic Places in the Civil Rights Movement http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/jackie-robinson/  Primary resources and National Archive Documents detailing Jackie Robinson’s role in the quest for civil rights http://www.archives.gov/education/lessons/brown-v-board/  Primary source documents detailing the integration of schools movement http://www.archives.state.al.us/teacher/rights.html  Collection of primary source documents from the “riding the bus” to “voting rights” http://www.sitins.com/timeline.shtml  Timeline of events in the Civil Rights Movement dating from 1819 Selma march: http://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/civilrights/al4.htm
  • 27. Resources for this Unit – Literature Mississippi Bridge by Mildred Taylor. Set in the 1930’s segregation in Mississippi. Deals with the issue of segregated buses at that time. There is a bus accident, and the hero is one of the African American men that had been kicked to the back of the bus. How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent, by Julia Alvarez. Family that leaves the Dominican Republic and moves to New York. A very nice chapter on the learning of English and going to school in their new country is recommended for reading. Lupita Manana by Beatty, Patricia. Offers students both a view of contemporary immigration issues and an account of undocumented immigration that is engaging and realistic. The economy of Mexico is quickly deteriorating and many families are struggling desperately to make ends meet. After her father is killed in a fishing accident, 14-year-old Lupita and her brother must cross the border from Mexico and find work to support their family back home. The two come to the U.S. with the expectation that they will be able to live with their aunt in California. This aspect of the fictional story is based largely on the reality that many undocumented immigrants come to the U.S. with the help of family and friends already established in this country. The novel offers a realistic portrayal of the risks and dangers of illegally crossing the border.
  • 28. Resources for this Unit – Literature (Cont.) Code Talker by Joseph Brushac. A fiction novel based on events during World War II, about a Navajo boy who is sent away from his tribe to a mission school, forced to learn the ways of white people. He is taught that he should be ashamed of his culture, and his school tries to take the identities of the Navajos away. His name is changed and he is forced to speak English. Despite this poor treatment, he ends up rising above it all and helping the U.S. win World War II. A Tugging String: A Novel about Growing up during the Civil Rights Era, by David Greenberg. A fictionalized accounts of the author’s childhood growing up in New York during the civil rights struggles of the 1950s and 1960s, when African Americans were fighting for their rights. The boy’s father, during this time, was a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. Maria Takes a Stand: The Battle for Women’s Rights, by Norma Jean Lutz. Twelve-year-old Maria Schmidt finds a cause to support in 1914 despite all that is going on with the war: women’s suffrage. This book uses real historical events to tell a fictional story of a girl who has to overcome personal hardships to support a cause that is larger than herself.

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