0
JOURNAL PUBLICATION
“ Add your company slogan ”
…Methods and Approaches in Publishing Process

By

Maina M. Mohd B.Eng, M....
Outlines and Objectives
 At the end of this talk you should be able to:






Get Motivated to write
know the genera...
Motivations

 Set your goals
 Be determine
 Manage yourself (Time Management)
 Always have your to-do-list

2/6/2014

...
Why and where to publish?
 Research is completed only when the results are shared
with the scientific communities
 “Scie...
Information dissemination

1
Develop
an Idea

3
Carry out quality
research to collect
necessary data and
analyse.

2

Writ...
Conventional Structure
of a Journal Paper

2/6/2014

6
Organizing a Research Paper





Title of the paper
Authors names and complete affiliations
Abstract (100 to 250 words...
Title
 Manuscript starts with your proposed title
 Title must be informative, clear and show your
research depth

 Titl...
ABSTRACT
• Summary of your work
• Entices the reader to read on

Must bring out the novelty of your work
• Must be brief (...
ABSTRACT

 Abstract means what is in the content of your








paper!
Two kinds of abstract: descriptive and
inf...
Introduction/Background/Literature





Introduction usually contains background information
Avoid repeating the conte...
Introduction

 Historical background, theoretical needs,
plan of development.
 1st Paragraph, may be general, any
statis...
Paragraphs:

 How long should a paragraph be? 100 words ok!
 Keep in mind the central subject of your





paragraph...
Experiment or Analysis discussion

 Describe the apparatus and method used to obtain
the data.
 Avoid too much detail (p...
Experiment or Analysis discussion

 Describe the data collection and analysis.
 Fabricated data logger to register volta...
Material and Methods

 State materials used
 Explain your experimental design in detail
 Details about how you collect ...
Results and Discussion:

 Constitutes the main body of your paper,
the supportive data must be clearly
presented here.
 ...
Results and Discussion

 Each paragraph is covering a specific
topic and all the results come after you
have mentioned. E...
Results and Discussion

 This section typically contains tables
and graphs of all the data and analysis
for comparison.

...
Results and Discussion

 Not more than one figure per page of text
 Do not duplicate data in tables that are
adequately ...
Figures and Tables

 Number all the figures and tables
 Graphs are also shown as figures
 Provide captions for all figu...
DISCUSSION
Do not make this predominantly a rehash of
either the Introduction or Results. It should
present the overall si...
Conclusion

 Keep this section short and clear.
 State the most important findings and how
your work has advanced the fi...
Acknowledgement
 Acknowledgment:
 Indicate thanks to those who have helped with the work, but are
not co-authors. List f...
References
This is how citation indices are constructed. Worst thing
is to cite improperly an important reference from one...
References
Citations in the body of text e.g.;
Better estimate of evapotranspiration is essential to
determine the crop wa...
References:
Reference Lists. e.g:
Books:
Hudson, P. B. and K. Darlene (2013) Introduction to human ecology, 6th
edition, H...
Submission
&
Resubmission
Cover letter
Editor-in-chief,
Name of Journal.
Address:….

Date: ….

Dear Editor:
This is to submit our manuscript entitle...
Editorial board and Referees
 Consistency of paper, accuracy of your collected data,







research methodology, u...
Peer Review Process

Author
2/6/2014

Note: Only less than 2% of articles reach the bill board without
31
Response to Reviewers
you should respond to reviewers:
 Follow the same format as the reviewers – general and






...
Response to Reviewers
In accordance with the reviewers suggestion we have deleted
the section of text/table/figures.
In ac...
Resubmission Letter
Editor-in-chief,
Name of Journal.
Address:….

Date: ….
Manuscript No/Reference No:….

Dear (Name of th...
Publication Process
Revise your
paper to avoid
early rejection

Publisher

2/6/2014

35
ACCEPTANCE RULE

A
C
C
E
P
T
A
N
C
E
2/6/2014

Attention to details
Check and double check your work
Consider the reviews
...
Tips on Journal
Types and Database

2/6/2014

37
Types of journal manuscripts

 These Include;
 Original Research,
 Rapid Communications, (ie letters or Notes)
 Review...
How to publish in top journals?
Top journals have very high standards

 Theory development, Research methods has to be su...
Before you start writing

 Read out literatures; evaluate other research





works
Do research based on your concept...
Where do you publish?

 Conference proceedings (somewhat reviewed,
progress reports) These are not all in the citation
in...
Journal Impact factor
 Why is this important?
 How is it calculated?
 As defined by the Thomson Reuters Scientific corp...
ISI web of knowledge
Formatting
 Most journals have on-line Instruction to Authors . Some
cases manuscript template is included
 Many confere...
Writing Style

 Use simple sentences, unless you are comfortable





writing complex and compound sentences
Avoid Re...
TENSES

Text can be written in either past or present tense,
the preference is to some extent personal. Past
tense is used...
Common Mistakes in
Writing

2/6/2014

47
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing











Poor organization
Misreading the reader
Writing technicalese
Len...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Poor organization:
Poor organization stems from poor
planning. A computer programm...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Misreading the reader:
Just know your readers whether
businessmen, academician, or...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Writing in technicalese:
Anyone who reads technical documents knows the
danger of ...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

Lengthy Sentences:
Lengthy sentences tire the reader and
make your writing hard to r...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Big Words:
Engineers sometimes prefer to use big,
important-sounding words instead...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Writer’s block:
Writer’s block isn’t just for professional writers;
it can afflict...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Poorly defined topic:
Effective writing begins with a clear
definition of the speci...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Stopping after first draft
All write ups need revision to avoid mistakes
and ensur...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Inadequate Content
 The content of your manuscript should
be substantially contai...
Common Mistakes in Technical Writing

 Dull wordy prose:
Technical professionals are busy people. Make
your writing less ...
“ Add your company slogan ”

LOGO
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Journal article & publishing lecture 2014

337

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
337
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Journal article & publishing lecture 2014"

  1. 1. JOURNAL PUBLICATION “ Add your company slogan ” …Methods and Approaches in Publishing Process By Maina M. Mohd B.Eng, M.Eng, PGDE (COREN, NSE, NIAE, NICOLD, IGRSM, ASABE) Tel: +60102964931 E-mail: mainam@buk.edu.ng LOGO
  2. 2. Outlines and Objectives  At the end of this talk you should be able to:      Get Motivated to write know the general structure of a journal paper know Journal Index ‘impact factor’ and how to calculate it. Write a cover letter for article submission and re-submission Understand the review process and response to reviewer’s comments  chose ISI Journals for your publication  understand the style of top quality paper and how to write a quality journal paper  Know some common mistakes in writing.
  3. 3. Motivations  Set your goals  Be determine  Manage yourself (Time Management)  Always have your to-do-list 2/6/2014 3
  4. 4. Why and where to publish?  Research is completed only when the results are shared with the scientific communities  “Scientific journals are the repository of the accumulated knowledge in a field”. If you don’t get it out, no one will notice it.  Internal reports, theses, etc. are not considered to be peer reviewed and thus are less suitable or widely distributed publications  “A literature built of particularly prepared, carefully reviewed contributions fosters the growth of a field” become famous.., In UPM:- to graduate (Research student)
  5. 5. Information dissemination 1 Develop an Idea 3 Carry out quality research to collect necessary data and analyse. 2 Write up - a paper for publication
  6. 6. Conventional Structure of a Journal Paper 2/6/2014 6
  7. 7. Organizing a Research Paper     Title of the paper Authors names and complete affiliations Abstract (100 to 250 words ) Keywords  Introduction (Background) Previous Work (Literature Survey)  Materials and Methods (Algorithm, Design, Methodology, Complexity Analysis, Quantitative Analysis, Statistical Analysis, …)  Results and Discussion  Conclusions  Acknowledgement  Reference
  8. 8. Title  Manuscript starts with your proposed title  Title must be informative, clear and show your research depth  Title: “..should be summarized the main idea of your paper with special attraction and stylish”. Should be ~ 10 to 15 words.
  9. 9. ABSTRACT • Summary of your work • Entices the reader to read on Must bring out the novelty of your work • Must be brief (100 to 250 words) •  An abstract should be  Accurate: should reflect the content of the paper.  Self-contained: avoid abbreviations, acronyms, define unique terms. Avoid references or equations.  Concise and specific: Be as brief as possible, yet convey the information.  It is better to write abstract as the last part of your manuscript preparation
  10. 10. ABSTRACT  Abstract means what is in the content of your        paper! Two kinds of abstract: descriptive and informative Never write an abstract with the 1st person Never use I have found! We discovered! Informative abstract = introductory summary Descriptive abstract merely tell what u have in your paper, this means some exact numbers, A 50% conversion was obtained. Abstract is short, single paragraph Never be more than half a page.
  11. 11. Introduction/Background/Literature     Introduction usually contains background information Avoid repeating the contents of abstract Is needed to place your work in context. Most citations occur here. Keep in mind that most potential referees are authors of similar work.  Typically should not exceed about 25% of total length.  Often the Introduction is the most daunting section of a paper to write. Probably not the best section to write first.
  12. 12. Introduction  Historical background, theoretical needs, plan of development.  1st Paragraph, may be general, any statistics, applications, a general view, where we are and where to go, show your aim and goals.  Last Paragraph, your objectives, purpose of this paper, only mentioned very little about your findings.  In between, various related sequential topics are discussed from your literature review, to get the attention on your focused research.
  13. 13. Paragraphs:  How long should a paragraph be? 100 words ok!  Keep in mind the central subject of your     paragraph Paragraphing breaks the materials into related subdivisions for the reader’s better understanding Long paragraph may have hidden missing points. Break your paragraph when your presentation takes a new turn. How do you provide transition? Paragraph opening’s statement must be related to previous paragraph.
  14. 14. Experiment or Analysis discussion  Describe the apparatus and method used to obtain the data.  Avoid too much detail (part numbers, model numbers, unnecessary dimensions)  Experimental schematic is more valuable than a photo of the outside of the apparatus  Reference to other similar experiments:  “this apparatus, which was originally developed for liquid oxygen viscosity measurements, was modified…”  “our design is similar to that of Maina et al. (2012)”
  15. 15. Experiment or Analysis discussion  Describe the data collection and analysis.  Fabricated data logger to register voltage and power  A possible sentence might be: “We recorded data over a range of temperatures between 1.7 and 2.1 K and pressures to 1 MPa.”  Present only that necessary to understand the experiment, but be complete.  It’s is OK to repeat some things published elsewhere if it helps the reader avoid looking up another reference.  This is often the easiest section to write and thus might be a good place to start
  16. 16. Material and Methods  State materials used  Explain your experimental design in detail  Details about how you collect your data.  How data was analyzed, software used etc., 2/6/2014 16
  17. 17. Results and Discussion:  Constitutes the main body of your paper, the supportive data must be clearly presented here.  Short description in initial paragraph is required to brief the reader. What are the topic you will discuss and how would be the arrangements. What are the parameters you have studied. The ranges and limitations, repeatability of the collected data. 2/6/2014 17
  18. 18. Results and Discussion  Each paragraph is covering a specific topic and all the results come after you have mentioned. Explain each figure and cite any table you have in appendix.  All the supporting information or any outcome of your calculation has to be presented in highly skilled manner.  Accuracy and consistency.
  19. 19. Results and Discussion  This section typically contains tables and graphs of all the data and analysis for comparison.  Should be compact. Don’t attempt to show everything. A sample of the data compared to a general correlation is good.
  20. 20. Results and Discussion  Not more than one figure per page of text  Do not duplicate data in tables that are adequately presented in graphs (Precision data is better in tables)  Compare your results with other similar experiments, if appropriate. In this case, be sure to use complete references. However, avoid sentence like “ the results confirm the work of Ahmad (2014)” except when the aim of your work is to verify.
  21. 21. Figures and Tables  Number all the figures and tables  Graphs are also shown as figures  Provide captions for all figures and tables  Figure 3. Effect of temperature on performance of external hard disk  Refer to each figure and table in the text.  Figure 4 shows the effect of …
  22. 22. DISCUSSION Do not make this predominantly a rehash of either the Introduction or Results. It should present the overall significance of your work and show how it agrees or disagrees with previous models or allows disparate observations to be drawn together. It is often very helpful to have a Figure of new model that is based on your findings.
  23. 23. Conclusion  Keep this section short and clear.  State the most important findings and how your work has advanced the field or contribute to knowledge.  Recommendations; Possibly comment on what additional work would be beneficial or is planned.
  24. 24. Acknowledgement  Acknowledgment:  Indicate thanks to those who have helped with the work, but are not co-authors. List funding source:  Thanks to Chinua Bello Aiyeola for technical assistance  Work supported by …….  This research has been supported by ….  You acknowledge the foundation that provide you financial support, World Bank, MOSTI, etc.  This research was made possible through a grant No. 063538, sponsored by Universiti Putra Malaysia
  25. 25. References This is how citation indices are constructed. Worst thing is to cite improperly an important reference from one of the referees’ work! Formats depend on journals. Limit self citation. Make sure you cite and list all. Never list any reference as you did not cite in the text and vice versa. Be complete and act as professional. Recommended to use Endnotes, mendeley, zotero etc. 2/6/2014 25
  26. 26. References Citations in the body of text e.g.; Better estimate of evapotranspiration is essential to determine the crop water demand as well as for improving irrigation delivery performance (Maina et al., 2012, Rowshon and Amin, 2003b and Hudson, 2013). Jia et al. (2011) claims that better estimate of evapotranspiration is essential to determine the crop water requirement. 2/6/2014 26
  27. 27. References: Reference Lists. e.g: Books: Hudson, P. B. and K. Darlene (2013) Introduction to human ecology, 6th edition, Harcourt Brace Javanovich college Publishers new York, USA. Journal: Maina M., (2012a) Soil salinity assessment of Kadawa Irrigation of the Kano River Irrigation Project (KRIP) Journal of Food, Agriculture & Environment Vol.10 (3&4): Helsinki Finland Pp 132-138 Patents: Bingham, James (2000) RF diathermy and faradic muscle stimulation treatment, US6094599 . Proceedings: Maina M., M. S.M. Amin, A. Samsuzana, and A. Wayayok (2012) Evaluation of field Measurements and Estimated Rice Crop Water Requirements. proceedings of paddy water management, 27-29 November 2012, Bangkok Thailand. *Follow the Journal’s Author guideline for manuscript preparations 2/6/2014 27
  28. 28. Submission & Resubmission
  29. 29. Cover letter Editor-in-chief, Name of Journal. Address:…. Date: …. Dear Editor: This is to submit our manuscript entitled (Title Name of your article for publication). All authors of this paper have participated in the planning, executing, and analysis of the data. They have read and approved the final version for submission. The contents of this manuscript have not been published previously, and are not under consideration for publication elsewhere. We supply the names and addresses of 5 potential reviewers for our manuscripts as follow: 1- Name of reviewers, Address, Telephone and e-mail. 2…. Sincerely Name of Correspondence Author, Department of ….. Name of your institution, Tel: +60102 email:…..@.....
  30. 30. Editorial board and Referees  Consistency of paper, accuracy of your collected data,       research methodology, use of high precision equipment, how was the application reflected on data Presentation of results, latest literature Not missing the very famous research scientist in the related field. Summarizing well, must have very strong abstract. Referee’s point of view is very important, then you should have your paper well structure. Content of paper in terms of sufficient data to conclude. Follow the instructions for author or Authors guidelines of the journals 30 2/6/2014
  31. 31. Peer Review Process Author 2/6/2014 Note: Only less than 2% of articles reach the bill board without 31
  32. 32. Response to Reviewers you should respond to reviewers:  Follow the same format as the reviewers – general and      specific Respond to all the comments of the reviewers in the same order Start the response to reviewer comments as follow: We made changes in according with the referees comments As requested, we provided sufficient details for full understanding of readers. We apologize for the departure from journal format which has now been corrected.
  33. 33. Response to Reviewers In accordance with the reviewers suggestion we have deleted the section of text/table/figures. In accordance with the reviewers request we have added the required information to the materials and methods/results section on Page Number, Line Numbers. We understood the reviewers point but feel that it is necessary to concentrate and focus on possible mechanisms and would therefore like to retain the section. In line with the advice of the referees revisions were successfully carried out …
  34. 34. Resubmission Letter Editor-in-chief, Name of Journal. Address:…. Date: …. Manuscript No/Reference No:…. Dear (Name of the editor) Thank you for your kind communication regarding our paper entitled Title. We are happy to learnt that it might be acceptable and thank the reviewers for their constructive criticisms. Our responses are detailed on the enclosed separate sheets. We would now like to resubmit for your further consideration of publication in (Journal Name). Please find enclosed a copy of the original with alterations marked in red for your information. We hoped that the revised version may now be acceptable for publication. Sincerely Name of Correspondence Author,
  35. 35. Publication Process Revise your paper to avoid early rejection Publisher 2/6/2014 35
  36. 36. ACCEPTANCE RULE A C C E P T A N C E 2/6/2014 Attention to details Check and double check your work Consider the reviews English must be as good as possible Presentation is important Take your time with revision Acknowledge those who have helped you New, original and previously unpublished Critically evaluate your own manuscript Ethical rules must be obeyed 36
  37. 37. Tips on Journal Types and Database 2/6/2014 37
  38. 38. Types of journal manuscripts  These Include;  Original Research,  Rapid Communications, (ie letters or Notes)  Review Articles  Case Studies  *Patent  * set of exclusive rights granted by a sovereign state to an inventor or their assignee for a limited period of time, in exchange for the public disclosure of the invention. 2/6/2014 38
  39. 39. How to publish in top journals? Top journals have very high standards  Theory development, Research methods has to be succinct.  Get research training if you need it (and nearly all of us do!)  Start as student, learn from others; support your peers  Never send out a paper without some internal review  Suffer rejection .., not to worry  Persist, Persist, Persist until….you got it.  Every paper will find a home * UPM pays for any impact factor Journal publication based on Q ranking in ISI –Thomson Reuters 2/6/2014 39
  40. 40. Before you start writing  Read out literatures; evaluate other research     works Do research based on your concepts and idea Prepared your own library Use Mendeley, Endnotes, Refworks etc., for referencing. Check your findings and prepare Figures and Tables.
  41. 41. Where do you publish?  Conference proceedings (somewhat reviewed, progress reports) These are not all in the citation index. Why indexing is so important?  Ans.: exposure to the world  Journals (better reviewing, archival results)  Physical sciences & applied sciences journals; an attractive journal  Engineering journals  How to choose the right journal for your work? Read the scope!  Journal ranking (impact factor*)  ISI Journals
  42. 42. Journal Impact factor  Why is this important?  How is it calculated?  As defined by the Thomson Reuters Scientific corporation, "journal impact factor" is the ratio of average number of citations to citable articles published in a journal.  Most prestigious journals have high impact factors: e.g. Nature (29), Science (24)  Engineering journals generally do not have high impact factors (0.2 ~ 5).
  43. 43. ISI web of knowledge
  44. 44. Formatting  Most journals have on-line Instruction to Authors . Some cases manuscript template is included  Many conference proceedings are going to do a format check before the technical editor even check the manuscript and review  MS word is acceptable for Elsevier journals, but some journals expect publications to be submitted in Latex format (good to learn latex)  Initial submission format often not finalized since most articles are sent back to author for revision.  Pay particular attention to reference format which is different depending on journal. Follow up exactly the journal format.*
  45. 45. Writing Style  Use simple sentences, unless you are comfortable     writing complex and compound sentences Avoid Repetition Make use of the grammar and spelling checker, but exercise caution Will a figure or table be able to say the same thing more effectively? Have a colleague to proof read your paper before submit.
  46. 46. TENSES Text can be written in either past or present tense, the preference is to some extent personal. Past tense is used because of reported speech for describing results of an experiment and procedures but use present tense for a general conclusion. Visit the following writer’s Blogs: - Thesiswhisperer.com - Writecheck (Turnitin)
  47. 47. Common Mistakes in Writing 2/6/2014 47
  48. 48. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing           Poor organization Misreading the reader Writing technicalese Lengthy sentences Big words Writer’s block Poorly defined topic Stopping after first draft Inadequate contents Dull, wordy prose
  49. 49. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Poor organization: Poor organization stems from poor planning. A computer programmer who would never think of writing a complex program without first drawing a flow chart would probably knock out a draft of a user’s manual without making notes or outline
  50. 50. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Misreading the reader: Just know your readers whether businessmen, academician, or technicians. Engineers are interested in your compressor’s reliability and performance, while the purchasing agent is more concerned with cost.
  51. 51. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Writing in technicalese: Anyone who reads technical documents knows the danger of “technicalese” — the pompous, overblown style that leaves your writing sounding as if it were written by a computer or a corporation instead of a human being. “Technicalese,” by my definition, is language more complex than the concepts it serves to communicate. By loading up their writings with jargon, phrases, passive sentences, and an excess of adjectives
  52. 52. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing Lengthy Sentences: Lengthy sentences tire the reader and make your writing hard to read. A survey indicates that in technical papers, the sentences become difficult to understand when they exceed 34 words in length.
  53. 53. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Big Words: Engineers sometimes prefer to use big, important-sounding words instead of short, simple words. This is a mistake; fancy language just frustrates the reader. Write in plain, ordinary English and your readers will love you for it.
  54. 54. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Writer’s block: Writer’s block isn’t just for professional writers; it can afflict engineers and managers, too. Writer’s block is the inability to start putting words on paper or computer, and it stems from anxiety and fear of writing. When technical people write, they’re afraid to make mistakes, and so they edit themselves word by word, inhibiting the natural flow of ideas and sentences.
  55. 55. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Poorly defined topic: Effective writing begins with a clear definition of the specific topic you want to write about. The big mistake many people make is to tackle a topic that’s too broad. For example, the title “Project Management” is too all encompassing for a technical paper.
  56. 56. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Stopping after first draft All write ups need revision to avoid mistakes and ensure clarity. Most journal articles suffer rejection at first preliminary check not due to the conceptual framework but serious fault in the presentation of facts. Revision is necessary after first draft. 2/6/2014 56
  57. 57. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Inadequate Content  The content of your manuscript should be substantially contained enough information worthy of sharing.  Avoid ‘onion cutting’ strategy to get many papers out of a single study. 2/6/2014 57
  58. 58. Common Mistakes in Technical Writing  Dull wordy prose: Technical professionals are busy people. Make your writing less time consuming for them to read by telling the whole story in the fewest possible words. How can you make your writing more concise? One way is to avoid redundancies — a needless form of wordiness in which a modifier repeats an idea already contained within the word being modified.
  59. 59. “ Add your company slogan ” LOGO
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×