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Chapter5

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  • 1. The Interaction Design of Microsoft Windows CE Sarah Zuberec Productivity Appliance Division, Microsoft Corp . Presented By : Ugur Kuter Dept. of Computer Science, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742
  • 2. Outline <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>User Interface (UI) Design Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Evolution of Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Handheld PC (H/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Palm PC (P/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto PC (A/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Comparison: Windows CE vs. PalmPilot </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul>
  • 3. Introduction – Windows CE <ul><li>An operating system designed to run on </li></ul><ul><ul><li>computers that are considerably smaller than PCs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>portable devices designed to be a “Desktop Companion” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>products that support TV-, Internet-related applications </li></ul></ul>
  • 4. Outline <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>User Interface (UI) Design Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Evolution of Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Handheld PC (H/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Palm PC (P/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto PC (A/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Comparison: Windows CE vs. PalmPilot </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul>
  • 5. User Interface Design Goals <ul><li>Achieve consistency rather than predictability </li></ul><ul><li>Make use of users’ existing PC expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Support user tasks on various platforms </li></ul><ul><li>Develop systems that are easy to integrate with existing PC systems </li></ul>
  • 6. Outline <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>User Interface (UI) Design Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Evolution of Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Handheld PC (H/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Palm PC (P/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto PC (A/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Comparison: Windows CE vs. PalmPilot </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul>
  • 7. Evolution of Windows CE Design: Handheld PCs (H/PCs) [1995] <ul><li>The first H/PC prototype contained concepts of desktop PCs but did not have much affinity </li></ul><ul><li>Screen size 480 x 240 pixels </li></ul><ul><li>Input/Output Methods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A keyboard for touch-typing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A touch screen for navigation on the interface </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Silk-screened buttons that enabled global functionality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Single-tap activation for the applications </li></ul></ul>
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  • 10. Evolution of Windows CE Design Handheld PCs (H/PCs) [1995] <ul><li>Usability Testing: Controlled Experiments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>People found the size of certain targets too small </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People were not able to identify the active areas on the interface </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People were confused with the selection / activation model </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In other words, the interface design is failed! </li></ul>
  • 11. Evolution of Windows CE Design Handheld PCs (H/PCs) [1995] <ul><li>New interface that strongly resembles Windows Desktop </li></ul><ul><li>The same input/output characteristics, tasks and product goals </li></ul><ul><li>Usability Testing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most targets are perceived as too small to hit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Single-tap activation is efficient </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto-save model fails </li></ul></ul>
  • 12.  
  • 13. Evolution of Windows CE Design Palm PC (P/PC) [1998] <ul><li>Design Goals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fit the H/PC interface into a smaller size </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>320 x 240 pixel screen </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide quick information look-up and entry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable information customization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make it smaller and easy to carry </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Alternative Input/Output methods to H/PC </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware buttons for scrolling up/down </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Handwriting recognition and voice recording </li></ul></ul>
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  • 17. Evolution of Windows CE Design Palm PC (P/PC) [1998] <ul><li>Usability Testing: Controlled Experiments </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Data entry using a small on-screen keyboard is tedious </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The use of keyboard is rated as easiest to use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Subjects were the fastest and most accurate with the keyboard </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In general, handwriting recognizer is rated low as an input method </li></ul></ul>
  • 18. Evolution of Windows CE Design Auto PC (A/PC) [1998] <ul><li>First product that deviates from the Windows 95 look designed to support tasks of a mobile professional while driving </li></ul><ul><li>Uses New forms of Input/Output Methods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No stylus and no touch screen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A numeric keypad for character inputs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speaker-independent voice command interface </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sound feedback about the state of the system </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Infrared connections to H/PCs and P/PCs </li></ul></ul>
  • 19.  
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  • 21. Evolution of Windows CE Design Auto PC (A/PC) [1998] <ul><li>Usability Testing: Field Studies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interoperability of in-car equipment was compelling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>People usually plan their tasks before getting into the car </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They need to be kept informed about schedule changes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The data is then synchronized at the office/home </li></ul></ul>
  • 22. Outline <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>User Interface (UI) Design Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Evolution of Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Handheld PC (H/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Palm PC (P/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto PC (A/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Comparison: Windows CE vs. PalmPilot </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul>
  • 23. Windows CE vs. Palm <ul><li>Target audience: PC users </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Designed as a Desktop companion </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Consistency </li></ul><ul><li>Application switching </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple taps required to access information </li></ul><ul><li>Target audience: PC users </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Does not emulate PC design </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Predictability </li></ul><ul><li>No application switching </li></ul><ul><li>Quick and instant access to information </li></ul>
  • 24. Outline <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>User Interface (UI) Design Goals </li></ul><ul><li>Evolution of Design </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Handheld PC (H/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Palm PC (P/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Auto PC (A/PC) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Comparison: Windows CE vs. PalmPilot </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions </li></ul>
  • 25. Conclusions <ul><li>Implemented in a way to achieve consistency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Take something that users understand and use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>And copy it </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Familiarity and functionality is satisfied; but not usability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interface consistency is not enough to ensure success </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Long-term usage is hampered </li></ul></ul>
  • 26. Conclusions <ul><li>Despite these facts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Respect must be given to desktop Windows when creating Windows CE interfaces </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One cannot ignore Windows to create successful products </li></ul></ul><ul><li>So, the saga continues…. </li></ul>

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