Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Microsoft Word - Quocirca - Managed Hosting in Europe - June 2009

824

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
824
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.              Managed hosting in Europe  A review of the managed hosting market and suppliers in Europe    June 2009      The term “managed hosting” describes the provision of a ready to use  IT  stack  including  hardware  and  infrastructure  software  for  the  deployment  of  applications.  Providers  house  the  infrastructure  in  central data centres accessed by customers over the internet. In the  past this has usually been on the basis of hardware servers dedicated  to individual customers, however the increasing use of virtualisation  has  allowed  managed  hosting  providers  to  reduce  costs  by  sharing  infrastructure  between  customers,  creating  the  earliest  versions  of  what  the  industry  now  refers  to  as  compute  clouds.  Computing  platforms  provisioned  and  managed  by  specialists  provide  higher  service  levels,  greater  ease  of  secure  access  and  more  manageable  costs than many organisations are able to achieve internally.  Bob Tarzey Clive Longbottom Quocirca Ltd Quocirca Ltd Tel : +44 7900 275517 Tel: +44 771 1719 505 Email: bob.tarzey@quocirca.com    Email: clive.longbottom@quocirca.com  An independent report by Quocirca Ltd. www.quocirca.com Commissioned by NTT Europe Online
  • 2. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009      Managed hosting in Europe  A review of the managed hosting market and suppliers in Europe    The managed hosting market in Europe is thriving despite the current economic conditions. This  report looks at the reasons why, what buyers should look for and who the main providers are.     Executive summary  • Managed hosting is attractive to organisations of all sizes as it allows them to acquire IT infrastructure at a  controlled cost, whilst reducing risk and adding value to their broader business community  Even during  economic  hard times,  managed  hosting  providers  are  seeing growth as  businesses  can deploy  new  applications  on  infrastructure  paid  for  out  of  operational  expenditure.  The  service  levels  offered  are  often  better  than  those  provided  by  internal  IT  departments  and  applications  are  easily  shared  with  customers, partners and suppliers.  • Quocirca recognises four types of managed hosting provider (MHP)  First  there  are  the  pure  plays  for  whom  managed  hosting  is  their  primary  business,  second  are  the  major  system  integrators  that  offer  managed  hosting  as  part  of  a  broader  service  delivery,  third  are  ISPs  and  network  service  providers  that  provide  managed  hosting  as  a  value  add  to  their  networking  services  and  finally there are the cloud platform providers that have emerged out of the software as a service market.  • MHPs vary in how they target markets and how they sell their services  Some MHPs focus mainly on the enterprise, others more on small and medium sized business, whilst a few  specialise in working with independent software vendors. Their market focus will control how they take their  service to market and this report helps identify the right provider to approach for a given size or type of end  user organisation.  • Charging models vary but are always based around a subscription  Historically  for  one‐to‐one  infrastructure  provision,  charging  has  been  based  on  a  fixed  cost  per  allocated  resource, but with the increasing use of shared infrastructure there is a direct link between the customer and  physical resource and has lead to more flexible charging models such as per transaction, per volume of data  or per user/month.  • Most  managed  hosting  providers  adhere  to  the  best  practice  standards  for  data  security  and  IT  management   ISO27001  and  related  standards  outline  best  practice  for  data  security  and  is  widely  adopted  by  managed  hosting providers, as is ITIL® for good practice in IT infrastructure management. Suppliers can also help their  customers  with  specific  needs:  for  example  meeting  the  requirements  of  the  payment  card  industry  for  handling credit card data.  • The hardware used by MHPs is largely irrelevant to end user organisations and the software infrastructure  provided is driven by customer demand, which is mainly for Microsoft Windows and Linux  About  60%  of  demand  is  for  Windows  and  30%  for  Linux.  The  increasing  use  of  virtualisation  allows  the  separation of hardware and infrastructure software and the sharing of resource, dramatically reducing costs.  VMware is the most widely use virtualisation platform, even by providers that focus on Microsoft.   Conclusion  All  businesses  have  a  core  focus  and  for  managed  hosting  providers  that  is  the  provision  and  management  of  top  quality IT infrastructure services. Businesses that recognise the benefits of a highly available and secure computing  platform should consider turning to experts for the provision of this, freeing their organisation to focus on its own  core activities.      ©Quocirca 2009  Page 2   
  • 3. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009      Contents  1  INTRODUCTION—FROM MAINFRAME BUREAUX TO CLOUD COMPUTING ............................................................................ 4  2  REPORT BACKGROUND ......................................................................................................................................................... 4  3  WHY MANAGED HOSTING? ................................................................................................................................................... 5  4  WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN AN MHP ........................................................................................................................................... 6  4.1  TYPES OF MHP.................................................................................................................................................................. 6  4.2  MHP TARGET MARKETS ....................................................................................................................................................... 7  4.3  CHARGING MODELS ............................................................................................................................................................. 7  4.4  STANDARDS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 8  4.5  SERVICE LEVEL AGREEMENTS (SLA) ......................................................................................................................................... 9  4.6  REDUNDANCY .................................................................................................................................................................... 9  4.7  APPLICATION TESTING .......................................................................................................................................................... 9  5  MHP INFRASTRUCTURE  .......................................................................................................................................................  0  . 1 6  CONCLUSIONS .....................................................................................................................................................................  3  1 7  MHP SUMMARY DESCRIPTIONS ...........................................................................................................................................  4  1 7.1  TYPE 1—PURE PLAY MHPS .................................................................................................................................................  4  1 7.1.1  NTT Europe Online ........................................................................................................................................................ 14  7.1.2  Rackspace Hosting ....................................................................................................................................................... 14  7.1.3  Savvis ............................................................................................................................................................................ 15  7.1.4  Attenda......................................................................................................................................................................... 15  7.1.5  7global ......................................................................................................................................................................... 15  7.2  TYPE 2—SYSTEMS INTEGRATORS THAT OFFER MANAGED HOSTING AS PART OF A BROADER SERVICE OFFERING .............................................  6  1 7.2.1  Atos Origin  ................................................................................................................................................................... 16  . 7.2.2  BT Global Services ........................................................................................................................................................ 16  7.2.3  Cable and Wireless ....................................................................................................................................................... 17  7.2.4  Fujitsu Services ............................................................................................................................................................. 17  7.2.5  IBM ............................................................................................................................................................................... 17  7.2.6  Logica ........................................................................................................................................................................... 18  7.2.7  Orange Business Services ............................................................................................................................................. 18  7.2.8  T‐Systems ..................................................................................................................................................................... 18  7.3  TYPE 3—INTERNET SERVICE PROVIDERS WITH MANAGED HOSTING SERVICES ......................................................................................  9  1 7.3.1  Claranet ........................................................................................................................................................................ 19  7.3.2  COLT ............................................................................................................................................................................. 19  7.3.3  Easynet ......................................................................................................................................................................... 19  7.3.4  Global Crossing ............................................................................................................................................................. 19  7.3.5  Hostway ....................................................................................................................................................................... 20  7.4  ONES TO WATCH ...............................................................................................................................................................  0  2 7.4.1  2e2................................................................................................................................................................................ 20  7.4.2  PEER1 ........................................................................................................................................................................... 20  7.4.3  eLINIA ........................................................................................................................................................................... 20  7.4.4  Centrinet ....................................................................................................................................................................... 20  7.4.5  OpSource ...................................................................................................................................................................... 20  ABOUT NTT EUROPE ONLINE .......................................................................................................................................................  1  2 ABOUT QUOCIRCA  ......................................................................................................................................................................  2  . 2       ©Quocirca 2009  Page 3   
  • 4. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009      1 Introduction—from mainframe bureaux to cloud computing  This paper reports on the state of the managed hosting market in Europe in 2009.   “Hosting”  is  a  widely  used  term  in  the  IT  industry;  the  addition  of  the  verb  “managed”  narrows  it  to  include  those  hosted services that are managed for the subscriber by the provider. So managed hosting does not include pure co‐ location services, where just data centre space is provided. Neither is it taken to include hosted business applications  such as email and CRM (so called software as a service, or SaaS).  Trying  to  categorise  such  things  is  always  problematic  as  there  is  much  overlap.  Many  managed  hosting  providers  (MHPs)  buy  data  centre  space  from  co‐location  providers  and  have  SaaS  providers  as  customers.  Perhaps  the  best  way to think of a managed hosting service is the provision of a ready to go managed computing stack including server,  storage and networking hardware plus infrastructure software on which customer applications are deployed. Driven  by customer demand, the software component of that stack is most commonly based on Microsoft Windows or Linux,  increasingly virtualised using VMware.  There  is  nothing  new  about  managed  hosting;  it  is  almost  as  old  as  the  IT  industry  itself.  Back  in  the  1960s  it  was  possible  to  buy‐in  compute  power  from  mainframe  service  bureau  and,  for  some,  this  is  still  a  lucrative  business.  There  have  long  been  service  providers  that  will  take  over  existing  hardware  and  software  infrastructure  and  manage  it,  sometimes  literally  putting  it  in  a  van  and  moving  it  to  the  “In 2009, the managed  hoster’s  premises.  In  the  last  decade,  however,  a  new  sort  of  managed  hosting  has  emerged  based  on  cheap  commodity  hosting stack is most  hardware.  commonly based on  Initially  this  was  mostly  one‐to‐one  hosting,  where  each  Microsoft Windows or  customer  had  their  own  assigned  hardware  servers  and  Linux”  benefited from sharing the cost of just data centre and network  infrastructure with others. However, the concept of sharing has  gone  a  stage  further  in  the  last  few  years  with  the  widespread  adoption  of  virtualisation,  allowing  the  one‐to‐many  sharing  of  server and storage hardware enabling providers to achieve ever greater economies of scale. The culmination of this  process has led to the emergence of so called cloud computing platforms.  Whilst this report focuses on traditional managed hosting and not cloud platform providers, it is the view of some in  industry—including Quocirca—that a managed hosting service based on shared infrastructure and a cloud platform  amount to much the same thing and, at the very least, both aim to provide computing resources to similar types of  customers.  Although  it  should  be  noted  that  MHPs  largely  focus  on  the  provision  of  Windows  and  Linux  infrastructure, some cloud platforms are highly proprietary. This version of Quocirca’s managed hosting report covers  cloud computing platforms in section 4.1.  2 Report background  This report describes the benefits of managed hosting and details the services of some of the major providers. The  market is huge, so it limits itself mainly to those that provide their services across Europe. This may or may not mean  infrastructure  in  multiple  countries  as  some,  for  example  Rackspace,  sells  managed  hosting  service  across  Europe  using infrastructure based in just one country (UK); others, such as NTT Europe Online, have facilities across Europe.  In some cases local infrastructure can be an advantage for performance reasons (see section 5) but there are other  benefits such as better access to language skills for support and the ability to offer contracts under local law. Some  smaller, local MHPs are referred to where an aspect of their service is of particular interest.  The report does not claim to be 100% inclusive, because there are so many providers, but Quocirca believes most of  the major suppliers that fit the definition “pan‐European managed hosting provider” are included; apologies upfront  for any omissions.   With any such report there will be those reading it with an interest in managed hosting who will want to report  such errors and omissions for a planned future version of the report—Quocirca is happy to receive such feedback  via the following email address managed_hosting@quocirca.com.  ©Quocirca 2009  Page 4   
  • 5. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    The  level  of  detail  provided  to  Quocirca  for  this  report  varied  from  one  MHP  to  another.  Quocirca  sent  a  detailed  questionnaire to all the companies that are featured. Some enthusiastically returned it within days, some chose not  complete it for non‐disclosure or other reasons. Tables and charts are dispersed throughout the report to show how  different provider’s offerings vary; where detail was not available this is indicated.  This is a free report in line with Quocirca’s business model. Upfront sponsorship for the report was provided by NTT  Europe Online and Quocirca is grateful for its support. NTT Europe Online has a vested interest as it is a provider of  managed hosting services. However, the report is intended to be impartial and Quocirca believes the reader will find  this to be the case, although the case studies included are all provided by the sponsor.  3 Why managed hosting?  IT infrastructure has become more and more of a commoditised utility and, generally speaking, businesses don’t run  utilities, they buy them in. Furthermore, for most organisations, the availability of IT infrastructure is business critical;  it takes specialists to make sure utilities are constantly available and performing well.  Before the mid‐1990s the provision of managed hosting, in the form of mainframe bureaux, was restricted to large  enterprises. One reason for this was the cost of leasing a network connection to such services. The availability to all of  a cheap to use, standardised, ubiquitous network from the mid 1990s onwards (the internet) meant it was possible to  open up managed hosting services to all.  Whilst  many  enterprises  make  extensive  use  of  managed  hosting  services  it  has  also  been  a  boon  for  smaller  organisations,  especially  those  where  internet  delivery  has  become  critical  to  their  business.  These  fall  into  two  categories:  1. Small and medium sized business (SMBs) that have limited in‐house IT skills  2. Independent software vendors that are moving to a software as a service (SaaS) based delivery model  The  benefits  of  managed  hosting  for  any  organisation  are  best  described  in  terms  of  improved  cost  management,  business risk reduction and added business value.  Cost management  Generally speaking, managed hosting offerings are paid for through a subscription (see section 4.3), which is hard to  compare  directly  with  the  alternative  of  buying  and  managing  all  the  components  in‐house.  The  fact  that  such  subscriptions  are  paid  for  out  of  operating  expenditure  (opex),  rather  than  capital  expenditure  (capex),  appeals  to  many businesses, especially when on‐going finances are unpredictable. Using a managed hosting platform will almost  certainly lead to a lower cost of ownership, due to the economies of scale achieved through sharing infrastructure  from servers to data centre space.  Furthermore, because MHPs pay close attention to cost it is in their interest to manage software licences carefully; an  MHP will not pay for more software licences than it needs. They also benefit from special licencing arrangements with  software vendors that are not available to end users, such as Microsoft SPLAs (service provider licence agreement). So  economies of scale apply just as much to software as to hardware.  Risk reduction  Ensuring IT systems are kept running is a specialist task. For sure, a  server can be expected to run for months or years without trouble,  but  when  it  does  go  wrong,  fixing  it  or  replacing  it  quickly  is  “MHPs can reduce the  essential. Add in all the other links in the chain—storage hardware,  risk of IT failure,  network  routers,  firewalls  etc.—and  regular  problems  with  availability are inevitable. Keeping infrastructure running, ensuring  committing to service  there is built‐in redundancy and spare parts available, is the job of  levels that internal IT  MHPs,  who  do  it  all  based  in  purpose‐built,  enterprise‐class  data  centres. IT failure is a risk most do not want to contemplate; MHPs  departments would  can  reduce  the  risk  of  it  happening,  committing  to  service  levels  not”  that internal IT departments would not.  Another  area  where  risk  becomes  easier  to  manage  relates  to  escrow  agreements.  Such  agreements  ensure  the  availability  of  software  code  should  the  provider  cease  trading.  Using software deployed on MHP infrastructure means that the ownership of the software can change, without any  disruption of service. If the software was deployed on the software provider’s own infrastructure it is possible that  the hardware assets involved could be sold by receivers and that would mean the end user having to redeploy the  given software following a possible disruption of service of indeterminate length.  ©Quocirca 2009  Page 5       
  • 6. Managed d hosting in Europe  Ju une 2009    Added valu ue  By  its  ver nature,  inf ry  frastructure  provided  by  an  MHP  is  deesigned  to  be  accessed  b outsiders.  As  by  businesses are  increasingly  seeing  the  benefits  of  s  providing  direct  access  to  business  applications  for  external  contractors  and  the  employees  of  customers, , suppliers and partners (Fi igure 1) it makes  sense  to  h osted  by  a  3rd  party  with  t have  these  ho d the  experience and  skills  to  provide  su open  access  e  uch  with  appro opriate  securrity.  This  also applies  to  an  o  increasingl flexible  wo ly  orkforce,  mak king  it  easier  to  support ho ome and mobile workers.    4 Wha at to look k for in an MHP  The selectiion of an MHP P is a critical d decision; whilsst it  is possible  to change it  can take a lo ot of effort to  do so and co ontracts endure for many y years. This sec ction examine es  those aspeects of a mana aged hosting s service that shhould be considered before e making such h a commitme ent.  4.1 Typ pes of MHP  MHPs can be divided int to four broad categories:  Type 1—pu ure‐play man naged hosting specialists  These are MHPs that are e in business purely for the e provision of managed hos . This genre arose in the mid  sting services. 90s as the inte to late 199 ernet opened up the possib bility of manag ged hosting. If f your organissation is in a g given providerr’s  target marrket you shou uld get all the e attention yoou require. Such specialists generally have a high leve el of standard ds  compliance e and uniform m service level ls.  Type 2—sy ystem integra ators (SI) with h a managed h hosting servicce  Many systeems integrato ors have provi ided managed d hosting as ppart of a broadder delivery o of IT services f for many year rs;  for  example,  developing  a  supply  ch hain  managemment  system  for  customer and  then  h rs  hosting  and  managing  it  fo m or  them. For  this reason, some system i integrators ar re not all that interested in selling managed hosting in n its own righ ht,  although  s some  are,  for example  BT.  Many  SIs  ha built  up  heterogeneou data  centr assets  over time  throug r  ave  us  re  r  gh  acquisition ns and the levvel of standarddisation can v vary. Most aree undergoing  data centre rationalisation n and reductio on  programs.  Type 3—in nternet service providers (IISP) with a ma anaged hostin ng service  Most interrnet service pr roviders (ISPs)) started off li ife in the 1990 0s to provide dial up and thhen broadband access to thhe  internet. T This was normmally accompanied by the p provision of hoosting service es, specifically y web sites. So ome have gonne  on to expaand their offeerings to inclu ude full manag ged hosting,  often with a  strong SMB f focus. Standarrds complianc ce  amongst ISSPs tends to b be lower than that achieved d by specialists.  Type 4—cloud platform m providers  ca’s  view  it  w not  be  lon before  clo computin platforms  a considere in  the  sam category  a In  Quocirc will  ng  oud  ng  are  ed  me  as  managed h hosting platfo orms. Indeed, many MHPs r refer to their shared infrast tructure offer rings as clouds s; Savvis says it  was “clouddy” before the e term cloud  came into co ommon usage e. Whilst it is  true that bot th MHPs and  cloud platform  providers  offer  utility  c computing  platforms  to  th users,  so heir  ome  of  the  ccloud  platform available  today  differ  in  ms  t important ways from Qu uocirca’s defin nition of mana aged hosting. There are 4 m main global platforms:  • Microsoft Azure: a purely Microsoft based M d offering  • Google: highly proprietary, a applications based on its ow wn tool set  • Ammazon EC3: a low level commputing platfoorm that allow ws deploymen nt of virtual machines   • Foorce.com: highly proprietar ry, based on salesforce.comm’s Apex deveelopment envi ironment      ©Quocirca a 2009  Page 6       
  • 7. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    4.2 MHP target markets  MHPs  target  certain  types  of  customers  where  they  have  built  up  expertise,  such  as  the  enterprise,  SMB  and  ISV  markets. Table 1 summarises the target markets of the MHPs covered in this report.  Table 1: Target markets Public sector Enterprise SaaS SMB ISV Type 1 ‐ pure play MHPs 7 Global X X X X X Attenda X X X X X NTT Europe Online X X X X X Rackspace X X Savvis X Type 2 ‐ system integrators offering managed hosting as part of a broader service Atos X X BT Varies by country C&W/Thus X X Fujitsu Services X X X X IBM X X X Logica X X X Orange Business Services X X X T‐Systems X Type 3 ‐ internet service providers offering managed hosting as an add on to internet access Claranet X X X X COLT X X EasyNet X X X X X Global Crossing X * X   Hostway X X X * Mid‐market only   MHPs  develop  routes  to  market  in  line  with  their  target  market.  This  should  make  them  easy  to  deal  with  if  your  organisation fits their target profile; for example those dealing with the SMB market will often work with resellers, for  example BT via BT Retail. Some have created specialist services for the independent software vendor (ISV) market and  this  is  reflected  by  their  participation  in  vendor  programs  such  as  Microsoft’s  ISV  incubator,  which  includes  NTT  Europe Online, Attenda, 7global, 2e2 and Rackspace. Some, such as OpSource, only target the ISV market.  4.3 Charging models  Charging models for hosted services vary, but they are all based on a subscription of some sort. The more control the  service provider has over the infrastructure being managed, the more likely they are to use virtual parameters such as  compute power used, number of virtual servers invoked or more business‐orientated metrics such as per user or per  transaction charges. When the customer specifies the hardware, charging tends to be based on material parameters  such as allocated floor space, number of rack units, power use and items of hardware under control.  With  a  standard  commoditised  stack  the  service  provider  understands  what  it  takes  to  power  it,  maintain  it  and  ensure high levels of availability better than when they are managing bespoke equipment. This then allows them to  bring charges in‐line with a customer’s own business model; so, for example, an ISV providing a hosted email service  may want charging based on the number of active mail boxes whilst a ticketing agency may want transaction‐based  pricing based on tickets issued.   Those  MHPs  that  have  a  focus  on  the  ISV  market  will  usually  be  flexible  enough  to  provide  charging  models  that  reflect those of the ISV itself.    ©Quocirca 2009  Page 7       
  • 8. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    4.4 Standards  There are a number of standards that pertain to good data centre management and data security. Some will matter  more  than  others  depending  on  the  deployment  being  planned.  Table  2  shows  the  standards  complied  with  by  individual MHPs.  Table 2 ‐ standards compliance PCI support ISO27001 ITIL® v2 ITIL® v3 COBIT Other Type 1 ‐ pure play MHPs 7 Global Y Attenda Y Y Y IP ISO 9001, PRINCE2 NTT Europe Online Y Y Y Y ISO 20000 (IP), PRINCE2 Rackspace PN Y Y Savvis Y Y Y Y Type 2 ‐ system integrators offering managed hosting as part of a broader service Atos Y Y Y Y Y BT Varies by data centre C&W/Thus Y Fujitsu Services Y Y Y PRINCE2 IBM Data not available Logica Y Y IP ISO 9001 and ISO 14000  Orange Business Services Y Y PR Y T‐System Data not available Type 3 ‐ internet service providers offering managed hosting as an add on to internet access Claranet Y COLT Y Y EasyNet Y Y Y Y Global Crossing IP Y IP Hostway IP IP ISO9001 IP = in progress, PR = partial, PN = Pending   ISO27001  Compliance with ISO 27001 shows the MHP follows generally accepted good practice to ensure the confidentiality,  integrity and availability of data. The standard is widely adhered to by MHPs, but check for full certification, which  means compliance is externally audited every 6 months.  ITIL®  Information  Technology  Infrastructure  Library  outlines  the  practices  that  are  the  most  beneficial  to  delivery  of  IT  services; v3 is the latest version and many organisations are in transition.  COBIT   Control  Objectives  for  Information  and  related  Technology  is  a  set  of  best  practices  for  IT  set  out  by  ISACA  (Information Systems Audit and Control Association).  SAS 70   Statement on Auditing Standard 70 is targeted at those who provide outsourced services, such as MHPs. It examines  how they process transactions and how they are audited.  PCI DSS  Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard: MHPs do not comply directly with PCI standards, but they can help  their  customers  to.  The  standard  which  details  how  payment  card  information  should  be  handled  requires  certain  levels of physical and virtual security.  PRINCE2  A  project  management  method  defined  by  the  UK’s  Office  of  Government  Commerce  (OGC)  for  UK  government  projects.  ©Quocirca 2009  Page 8       
  • 9. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    4.5 Service level agreements (SLA)  Any contract made with an MHP should address service levels and define what the penalties are for failing to meet  them. It has already been pointed out in section 3 that one of the benefits of working with an MHP should be a better  SLA  than  might  be  expected  from  an  internal  IT  function  but  also  that  failure  to  meet  the  defined  SLA  has  consequences.  A  key  metric  in  a  SLA  is  system  availability,  or  “up‐time”,  as  a  percent  of  total  time.  Typically  MHP  SLAs  provide  upwards of 99.95%, but remember there is a big difference between 0.05% outage which is almost 450 hours a year  and 0.005% outage which is less than 45 hours a year.  To  provide  visibility  into  the  systems,  most  MHPs  provide  some  level  of  End user case study—Boursorama access  to  systems  data  relevant  to  an  individual  customer,  but  the  ease  of  Boursorama is one of Europe's leading online share access  to  such  information  and  the  trading brokers and, in 2006, became an online bank tools  provided  will  vary.  Generally,  too. It is active in France, Germany, Spain and the UK. access  is  provided  via  a  web‐based  Boursorama.com brings together financial information customer  portal.  Some,  such  as  Global  from many sources to provide a single point of access Crossing  and  NTT  Europe  Online,  see  for a range of services producing over 3 million unique the access tools they provide as being a  visitors a month. A disruption in Bousorama’s online key differentiator.  service would mean a complete loss of contact with its customers and cause serious reputational damage. It 4.6 Redundancy  needs a guaranteed SLA with high uptime The  reason  that  MHPs  offer  such  high  commitments. service  levels  is  because  their  business  To achieve this, Boursorama initially worked with a US would  fail  if  they  did  not.  Their  provider, but wanted to bring its operations close to organisations  and  business  processes  home to improve performance times, which are critical are  based  around  keeping  IT  going  24  for financial transactions. hours a day, 7 days a week, 52 weeks a  year.  To  achieve  this,  MHPs  have  to  In 2003, after an evaluation of European MHPs, have  built‐in  redundancy  at  all  levels.  Boursorama turned to NTT Europe Online’s French This includes hardware, network access,  operation which offered the best value whilst meeting power supply and the data centre itself  the required SLAs, could perform the migration and (see section 5).  provide full redundancy with failover to NTT’s London data centre. For  one‐to‐one  hosting,  redundancy  is  relatively  expensive;  it  might  require  a  complete replicate system on hot stand‐ by so as soon as a problem occurs all users and transactions can be switched over whilst the failed system is fixed.  MHPs will charge a premium for this.  With shared infrastructure, redundancy is built‐in and automatic and consequently much cheaper. It is incumbent on  the  MHP  itself  to  have  a  fully  redundant  infrastructure.  The  infrastructure  will  not  be  reliant  on  a  single  item  of  hardware:  should  a  server  or  router  fail,  it  can  be  replaced  whilst  the  rest  of  the  system  keeps  running.  A  storage  failure of some sort may lead to some disruption whilst data is recovered, unless mirrored data sets are in use (for  which some MSPs will charge a premium). Most MHPs will have at least one secondary data centre facility.  4.7 Application testing  Obviously, before an application can be deployed it needs to be developed and tested. Most organisations maintain  an  internal  development  platform,  but  will  still  need  to  test  applications  on  an  MHP’s  infrastructure  before  deployment;  this  includes  post  deployment  updates.  With  one‐to‐one  hosting,  recreating  the  deployment  environment is expensive but with shared infrastructure it is easy and cheap and an isolated virtual environment can  be provisioned using the same underlying infrastructure that will be used for deployment.      ©Quocirca 2009  Page 9       
  • 10. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009      5 MHP infrastructure   This section looks at the infrastructure choices made by MHPs and options that they offer to their customers.  MHP hardware preferences  For the purchaser of managed hosting services hardware is pretty much irrelevant; it does not matter providing the  service works reliably. However, for the MHP itself, having good relationships with selected hardware providers are  important  to  ensure  favourable  pricing  and  good  service  levels,  so  they  work  with  selected  suppliers  from  a  predictable list.  For  the  hardware  vendors  themselves,  ISV case study—2e Systems these  relationships  are  critical,  as  2e Systems is an ISV serving four major airlines in managed  hosting  changes  the  whole  Germany, where it is based. It provides services for dynamic  around  how  businesses  pay  for  flight bookings, check-in, frequent-flyer programmes server  MIPs,  gigabytes  of  storage  and  and mobile notification—all considered critical for the network bandwidth.   on-going efficient operation of an airline. This is especially true in the SMB market;  2e Systems wanted to bring all its applications together consider  the  sale  of  an  accounting  to offer them as a single service and, to achieve the application.  In  the  past  each  SMB  would  highest possible service levels for its customers, it buy  an  accounting  system  and  choose  a  sought a managed hosting partner. hardware  server  to  deploy  it  on—so  the  hardware  vendors  had  many  Eventually 2e Systems selected NTT Europe Online opportunities  to  sell  their  equipment  because it was the most cost effective, could provide providing  they  had  the  right  channels.  the required service levels and a charging system that However,  if  the  same  accounting  reflected the business model of airlines; for example, a application  is  now  sold  as  service  cost per booking for ticket sales. deployed  on  hosted  infrastructure,  the  The applications are hosted at NTT’s Frankfurt data hardware  decision  is  made  just  once,  by  centre, which appealed to 2e Systems as it allowed the the  MHP—in  fact,  it  was  probably  made  teams from both companies to get to know each other long  before  the  decision  to  deploy  the  as they worked together to roll out the new services. accounting  application  service.  In  this  way the hardware requirements of many  businesses  are  aggregated  up  in  a  single  enterprise  size  chunk.  For  the  hardware  vendors  the  stakes  are  high  but  for  the  end  user  there  is  no  longer  the  distraction of a utility purchase, they can focus at a higher level in the IT stack where the value add to their business is  more obvious—software, which is covered in the next section.  Nearly all hosting services are based on commodity x86‐based hardware. HP is the most widely used, followed by IBM  and Sun. Dell and Fujitsu are less favoured although, unsurprisingly, as an MHP Fujitsu mainly uses its own hardware.  It will be interesting to see how Cisco fares as it enters the server market with its unified computing initiative as it  already has a relationship with most MHPs for the provision of networking kit. Some still offer services around other  proprietary  hardware,  for  example  IBM  mainframes,  but  this  is  generally  a  bespoke  one‐to‐one  service  and  is  not  about sharing infrastructure. Fujitsu has a legacy MVE mainframe business from its acquisition of ICL in 2000.  For storage, NetApp is the most widely used, followed by EMC, amongst those that reported to Quocirca; IBM and HP  are generally rated as secondary vendors. Some turn to more specialist vendors such as 3 Par and Pillar; interestingly,  3 Par, a specialist provider of high end storage systems, has placed a long term bet on the ascendancy of managed  hosting as the main way in which IT infrastructure will be provided to SMBs in the long term.  For networking the use of Cisco is pretty much ubiquitous, with Juniper being used in places and some other vendors  favoured as secondary suppliers.  Software preferences  The mix of software provided by MHPs reflects customer demand more than their own preferences. Whether it is an  ISV  deploying  a  SaaS  offering  or  an  end  user  deploying  their  own  application,  there  will  be  a  preferred  software  environment for doing so. That said, currently two main software infrastructure stacks prevail in the IT industry for  application deployment; Microsoft Windows/.NET and Linux/Java.  ©Quocirca 2009  Page 10       
  • 11. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    Where  MHPs  provide  figures  around  usage,  Windows  prevails  by  a  ratio  of  End user case study—UEFA around 2:1, although some, for example  The managing body for European football, UEFA, 7global,  specialise  in  only  providing  provides a streaming video service for all its matches to Microsoft.  The  Linux  distribution  most  35 broadcasters for viewers of matches in 120 widely  used  is  Red  Hat,  with  some  countries. Debian  and  SUSE.  Most  also  support  UNIX  where  required  (Sun  Solaris,  HP  To produce consistent high quality output UEFA required UX  and  IBM  AIX),  and  this  makes  up  a reliable platform, a high performance network and around 10% of business; some reporting  efficient content distribution capability. In addition it a decline, others slow growth compared  has to protect digital broadcast rights across to  its  two  bigger  competitors,  to  which  international boundaries. UNIX‐based applications are often being  Rather than trying to achieve this itself, in 2003 UEFA migrated.  turned to NTT Europe Online, which has enabled it to One thing that is clear from all MHPs is  provide a consistent high quality service for the last 6 the  rising  use  of  virtualisation.  NTT  years. Europe  Online  reports  that  70%  of  quotes now require a virtualised environment and it is a necessity for sharing infrastructure. One platform stands out  above all others—VMware—with XEN and Microsoft Hypervisor being used to a lesser extent. Virtualisation not only  makes the sharing of infrastructure easier, but means changing requirements can be more easily taken into account.  Those  MHPs  that  predicted future  requirements  expect demand  for  Microsoft‐based infrastructure to  outstrip that  for Linux.  At  the  application  sever  level,  .NET  and  J2EE  are  supported  in  line  with  operating  system  requirements.  The  J2EE  installed base is split between IBM WebSphere, Oracle (including the Oracle Application Server and BEA WebLogic)  and, to a lesser extent, open source products like JBoss and Tom Cat.  Finally, it should be pointed out that some MHPs specialise in the direct support of certain business applications like  SAP, Oracle Applications or Microsoft Exchange, SharePoint and Dynamics. This should not be confused with ISVs who  use MHP infrastructure to provide their own applications as a service.  Data centre location  Does a data centre location matter? To an extent yes, but it is more about the resources available at a given location  than  the  location  per  se.  Many  MHP  customers  will  see  little  need  to  visit  its  premises,  except  maybe  during  the  selection  phase.  For  some  time‐critical  applications,  such  as  share  trading  where  split  second  timing  can  make  a  difference,  it  is  seen  as  preferable  for  it  to  be  physically  close  to  a  data  centre,  hence  the  proliferation  of  them  in  London. However, this can lead to its own problems, especially regarding power supply.  Power has rapidly become the limiting factor for selecting locations for new data centres, and one way to get around  this is to head for areas where there is excess supply; for example South Wales in the UK, where manufacturing has  declined,  leading  to  excess  capacity.  Choosing  such  locations  has  the  additional  benefit  of  abundant  cheap  labour,  albeit with a certain amount of retraining required. There has been a trend by some to move to be near renewable  power  sources,  but  as  wind  and  fast  flowing  water  tend  to  be  in  remote  areas  there  is  a  danger  that  any  environmental  benefits  are  off‐set  by  some  MHP  employees,  who  actually  need  to  work  at  the  data  centre  site,  having to travel further to get to work.  Another consideration is network bandwidth. MHPs need direct access to the high bandwidth internet backbone to  ensure  high  performance,  often  seeking  to  have  two  providers  available  to  provide  redundancy.  This  is  a  major  consideration  for  any  MHP  building  its  own  data  centre,  but  for  those  that  work  with  co‐location  providers,  such  considerations  will  already  have  been  taken  in  to  account.  MHPs  that  are  also  carriers,  such  as  BT  and  Cable  &  Wireless will, for obvious reasons, provide primary internet access via their own networks.  Table  3  shows  the  European  countries  where  the  MHPs  covered  in  this  report  have  data  centres.  As  mentioned  in  section 2, in‐country presence can be an advantage for local language and legal support.  Many MHPs are consolidating data centres; for example, IBM has reduced its number of data centres worldwide from  around 100 to about 30. It might be useful to show total data centre floor space under management or a measure of  available spare data centre capacity, but few MHPs make such figures public, and if you are entering a contract to use  shared infrastructure, then available space is irrelevant as you want it to be filled with state of the art hardware ready  and waiting to run your applications.  ©Quocirca 2009  Page 11       
  • 12. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    The UK’s ascendance as a financial services centre and the fact that it is well served by many global internet carriers  has led to a predominance of MHP infrastructure in the UK, this is especially apparent with the pure play providers.    Table 3: Location of MHP data centres  Czech Republic Netherlands Switzerland Luxemborg Germany Denmark Portugal  Romania Belgium Sweden Norway Finland Ireland Poland France Spain Italy UK Type 1 ‐ pure play MHPs 7 Global X Attenda X X NTT Europe Online X X X X X Rackspace X Savvis X Type 2 ‐ system integrators offering managed hosting as part of a broader service Atos X X X X X X X BT X X X X X X X X C&W   X X X X X Fujitsu Siemens X X X X X X X X X X X X X IBM X X X X X X X X X Logica X X X X X X X X Orange (OBS) X X X T‐Systems No data Type 3 ‐ internet service providers offering managed hosting as an add on to internet access Claranet X X X X X X COLT X X X X X X X X X X EasyNet X X X X X X Global Crossing X X Hostway X X X X   Security  For many organisations the fact that data is stored outside of their own physical premises when working with MHPs  raises concerns, but providing due diligence has been done in selecting a provider this concern is misplaced, especially  if  they  are  complying  with  relevant  standards  such  as  ISO  27001.  In  fact  the  reverse  is  true;  working  with  an  MHP  should  provide  enhanced  levels  of  security  simply  because  the  infrastructure  it  is  stored  on  is  housed  in  a  secure  enterprise‐class facility and that those managing it have lot at stake if security is breached.  All MHPs provide fundamental IT security, including encryption, secure remote access, malware detection, firewalls  and so on, but the level of service offered and the types of products used will vary and in some cases there may be  additional charges for enhanced security.  Physical security is also an issue and gaining access to the physical infrastructure of an MHP will be harder than it is to  breach the premises of many SMBs.  Power supply and environment considerations  For MHPs, considerations around power supply are fundamental and when a new data centre facility is built or co‐ location  provider  selected,  these  data  centres  require  a  continuous  and  stable  power  supply.  Most  rely  on  taking  utility supply from the grid but have an emergency backup capability in place should the grid supply fail. This usually  consists of a huge array of batteries to keep things running for a few minutes whilst backup generators are started up,  usually powered by fuel oil stored on site for such emergencies.  As with the use of IT anywhere, MHPs are making more and more effort to make their use of power more efficient.  Hardware and software innovation helps with this and it is in the interest of MHPs to be using leading edge products  ©Quocirca 2009  Page 12       
  • 13. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    in this regard. Particularly for one‐to‐one hosting, MHPs sometimes base their charging on power usage (see section  4.3).  MHPs can drive environment messages around their efficient use of power; however some take it a stage further by  seeking  to  use  only  sustainable  power  supplies  either  purchased  over  the  grid,  or  by  locating  near  green  power  generation  facilities,  such  as  eLINIA,  which  derives  power  from  waste,  and  Centrinet  that  makes  use  of  local  windmills. As has been said earlier, a remote location for a data centre near a green power source is all well and good,  providing  all  the  saved  omissions  are  not  cancelled  out  by  employees  that  have  to  work  on  site  commuting  long  distances.  Claims  to  be  carbon  neutral  should  be  examined  closely;  for  example  some  environmental  claims  are  founded  on  carbon off‐setting (planting trees etc. in lieu of energy use), which is considered insubstantial by many environment  groups.  Finances  Finally, check the  state  of a given  MHP’s  finances.  In  the  dot‐com  crash  at  the  turn  of  the  21st  century  many  MHPs  went  out  of  “Few organisations  business  or  were  acquired.  The  market  is  more  mature  now  and  the suppliers covered in this report are all substantial organisations  revert to in house  so this is less of an issue, but should still be a consideration.  management once a    partnership with an  6 Conclusions  MHP has been formed”  Whether your organisation is a large enterprise, an SMB or an ISV,  there will be benefits to be found in working with MHPs for  sourcing part if not all of your IT infrastructure requirements. Finding the right MHP will take a degree of due  diligence. The partnership that is formed needs to be long lasting, as changing your MHP is possible but undesirable.  There is plenty of choice in Europe from the managed hosting specialists to the systems integrators, ISP and network  infrastructure providers that provide managed hosting as an add‐on service. Those already working with MHPs  recognise the benefits through better cost management, improved customer service and more reliable service  provision. Few organisations revert to in‐house management once a partnership with an MHP has been formed.      ©Quocirca 2009  Page 13       
  • 14. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009      7 MHP summary descriptions  Quocirca has defined four types of MHP in section 4.1 of this report. Entries for vendors for three of these types are  listed  here  by  category.  A  final  section  lists  what  Quocirca  has  termed  “ones  to  watch”,  which  includes  smaller  providers which cannot be considered pan‐European or those who have short term plans to set up in Europe.  7.1 Type 1—pure play MHPs  A  pure  play  MHP  has  operations  and  a  sales  process  that  is  geared  for  all  sizes  of  business  and  can  scale  up  their  services for customers as they grow. For a managed hosting service provider to say it serves the SMB market must  mean that it has the sales process in place to deal with such business.    7.1.1 NTT Europe Online  As  its  name  would  suggest,  NTT  Europe  Online  (NTT)  is  the  European  online  services  subsidiary  of  the  Japanese  communications  giant  NTT.  NTT  Europe  Online  was  formed  in  2006,  6  years  after  NTT  acquired  Verio,  a  managed  hosting  service  provider  with  active  operations  across  Europe.  NTT  has  expanded  the  original  service  and  now  has  data centres in Germany, France, UK, Spain and Switzerland, giving it local language and contractual support in all the  major European markets.  NTT targets both the enterprise and SMB markets with a range of services, including the straight provision of hosted  infrastructure  and  other  services  such  as  application  management,  video  archiving,  threat  management  and  virtualisation services. NTT also works with ISVs and is a delivery partner for IBM, Microsoft, Sun and Oracle.   Managed hosting, provided using a shared infrastructure, constitutes 90% of NTT’s business and it has been growing  at about 40% per year. It sees cloud computing, and in particular private clouds, as a natural extension of this. 50% of  its infrastructure is Microsoft Windows based and 45% Linux, the remainder being UNIX.  NTT is ISO27001 certified and is seeking PCI certification. Its engineers are trained to ITIL® v2/v3 level. It has various  pricing  models  based  on  per  transaction,  per  volume  of  data  processed,  per  unit  of  processing  time  used  etc.  depending on requirement. NTT sees cloud services as an important next step in its evolution and will be launching  new services in 2009 with a focus on security and reliability.  http://www.ntteuropeonline.com/    7.1.2 Rackspace Hosting  Headquartered  in  the  UK,  Rackspace  Hosting  Europe  provides  managed  hosting,  email  hosting  and  cloud  services  across Europe, Middle East and Africa. In 2008, Rackspace opened a new 4,600 square meter data centre in Slough  (UK) to supplement its facilities elsewhere in the UK, USA and Hong Kong. All of its data centres are SAS 70 compliant.  Traditionally  Rackspace  Hosting  has  provided  dedicated  servers  to  enterprises,  SMBs  and  ISVs,  offering  platforms  based on Microsoft Windows, Red Hat Linux and VMware.  In  the  last  few  years  Rackspace  has  developed  a  cloud  platform  known  as  Mosso,  which  gives  customers  the  cost  benefits and scalability of a virtualised infrastructure. It has three cloud services: CLOUD Servers, a Linux development  and deployment platform; CLOUD files, a storage and content distribution network; and CLOUD Sites, a deployment  platform for specific supported technologies such as PHP, MySQL, Python, .NET, SQL Server and IIS.  Rackspace is noted for what it calls “Fanatical Support®”.   http://www.rackspace.co.uk/support/      ©Quocirca 2009  Page 14       
  • 15. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    7.1.3 Savvis  Savvis provides a wide range of hosted data centre services from co‐location through to cloud offerings, which it has  had for over 4 years. Shared infrastructure services are built using Savvis’s flexible service model based on standard  components. Savvis provides its services to customers across Europe and beyond, but it has core strength in the UK.  Its main data centre infrastructure is in the UK with points of presence in Europe. It has recently built a new state‐of‐ the art facility in Slough in addition to data centres in Reading and London.  Savvis’  focus  is  principally  on  the  enterprise  market,  where  it  has  always  provided  dedicated  hardware  services,  enabling its customers to consolidate multiple data centres into a single Savvis facility. Over the last five years Savvis  has moved more and more into the provision of shared and utility based infrastructure. It has announced two Cloud  Compute offerings, which have been modelled on its successful heritage as a utility computing provider. “Dedicated  Cloud”, where servers are provided on a one‐to‐one basis with other infrastructure shared and “Open Cloud”, where  everything is based on shared infrastructure.  Savvis’ data centres in Europe are all ISO27001 accredited and SAS 70 compliant. Savvis follows ITIL® standards and  also helps some of its customers to achieve PCI compliance.  http://www.savvis.net/    7.1.4 Attenda  Attenda brands itself “The always on Managed Services Company”. It has four data centres in the UK and Germany,  providing  services  targeted  at  the  mid‐market  and  ISVs.  Attenda  is  part  of  Microsoft’s  incubator  program  for  ISVs  wanting to move to a SaaS model.  Around half of Attenda’s business is the provision of hosted servers on a one‐to‐one basis, but it also has a sizable  customer  base  using  its  shared  infrastructure  and  is  developing  a  cloud  platform  where  it  expects  to  see  the  most  growth in the next few years. The majority of its customers use a Microsoft based software stack.  Attenda has achieved ISO 27001, IS0 20000, ISO 90001, PRINCE2, ITIL® v2/v3 and Carbon Neutral Office compliance  for all its data centres and is working towards full PCI compliance. This all means Attenda has tight process control.  It offers a number of pricing models, including price per item of hardware, price per user, price per transaction and/or  a fixed price for agreed services over the length of a contract.  http://www.attenda.net/    7.1.5 7global  7global  is  a  UK‐based  provider  of  managed  hosting  services  focused  almost  entirely  on  the  provision  of  Microsoft  infrastructure  and  applications,  although  its  provision  of  shared  infrastructure  is  achieved  using  VMware  for  virtualisation. Its data centres are all fully ISO 27001 compliant.  7global  believes  growth  will  mainly  come  from  the  provision  of  application‐level  services,  for  example  Microsoft  Dynamics CRM, SharePoint portal and Exchange email, rather than at the pure infrastructure level, although this is  currently  the  majority  of  its  hosting  business.  7global  is  an  incubator  partner  for  Microsoft  independent  software  vendor (ISV) programme.  For infrastructure provision, 7global provides fixed price contracts for agreed resources over a given period of time,  whilst application‐level services are charged on a per user per month basis.  http://www.7global.com/      ©Quocirca 2009  Page 15       
  • 16. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    7.2 Type 2—systems integrators that offer managed hosting as part of a broader service offering  Some  organisations  that  provide  managed  hosting  services  are  not  really  interested  in  selling  them  as  standalone  services, the provision being embedded in larger contracts around IT delivery. Some of the big systems integrators,  such as CSC and HP/EDS, fall into this category and are not covered in this report.    7.2.1 Atos Origin  Atos Origin is a global systems integrator that does well over 90% of its business in Europe. It is principally focused on  the enterprise segment and sees managed hosting as part of a broader services engagement. IT has 31 data centres in  Europe.  Atos has reached its current size through merger and acquisition and its data centre portfolio reflects this. However,  Atos  has  striven  to  ensure  a  single  standard  across  all  data  centres  which  are  all  managed  to  ITIL®  v2/v3  level  to  ensure what Atos calls a “continuous service delivery model” (CSDM).  Its  history  of  serving  enterprises  has  left  Atos  with  a  sizable  mainframe  customer  base  and  50%  of  its  managed  hosting  revenue  is  mainframe‐based,  the  majority  of  the  remainder  being  Windows  and  UNIX.  Most  is  based  on  dedicated hardware, either co‐locating equipment owned by customers and managing it for them or provision of one‐ to‐one utility servers owned by Atos. There are plans to provide virtualised hosting on a one‐to‐many basis.  Traditionally Atos has had usage‐based pricing but for more dynamic delivery it uses a system called MOOD (managed  operations  on  demand),  whereby  the  customer  pays  a  base  price  and  what  they  pay  is  adjusted  each  month  depending on whether they have over or under used the service. Atos has recently implemented a pay for use pricing.    Atos has a green IT initiative, called H@RMONY, for advising its customers and ensuring good management of Atos’s  own IT infrastructure.  http://www.atosorigin.com    7.2.2 BT Global Services  Despite the “B” in BT standing for British, since its privatisation in the 1980’s BT has expanded through acquisition and  organic growth to become a truly global operation. It has data centres in all the larger Western European countries  and parts of the Americas and Asia Pacific.  Such growth means that the degree of standardisation across its data centres varies considerably, so BT has put in  place  a  program  it  calls  UNITE  aimed  at  ensuring  common  standards  and  levels  of  operating  efficiency.  Whilst  this  means services will vary from one country to the next, this will be hidden for those that engage with BT through its  virtual data centre programme (VDC).  VDC customers have a choice of a Windows or Linux software stack, for which it charges on a per virtual machine, per  year basis with an increment for gigabytes of data stored. BT has historically provided one‐to‐one hardware server  hosting,  including  mainframes  where  required,  but  it  expects  high  growth  to  come  from  VDC.  BT  sells  its  hosting  services direct to enterprises and to SMBs via its retail channel.   As BT owns its own network, it is a good choice for those who require a strong SLA for network performance across  multiple countries. BT claims that 42% of its data centre power supply is from renewable sources and aims to deliver  ever better environmental standards as outlined in its “Society and Environment Report” available at:  http://www.btplc.com/Societyandenvironment/ourapproach/sustainabilityreport/index.aspx        ©Quocirca 2009  Page 16       
  • 17. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    7.2.3 Cable and Wireless  Cable  and  Wireless  (C&W)  is  a  global  telecommunication  network  provider  that  also  provides  managed  hosting  in  Europe as part of its broader data centre to desktop IT consolidation services. The majority of its hosting business is  the  provision  of  dedicated  infrastructure  to  large  enterprises  and  government  bodies;  with  the  latter  there  is  sometimes limited sharing between related organisations.  There are some limits in its software infrastructure provision; for example only SQL Server and Oracle databases are  supported.  It  also  offers  application‐specific  services  such  as  hosted  Microsoft  Exchange  and  Citrix  server  based  computing.  C&W data centres are managed to ITIL® level 2 and are all ISO27001 compliant. It is a Microsoft gold partner and 80%  of its deployment is Microsoft based, the remainder being Linux and UNIX.  www.cw.com    7.2.4 Fujitsu Services  In  March  2009,  Fujitsu  announced  it  was  integrating  its  former  joint  venture  operation  with  Siemens  into  its  own  operations and, in EMEA, this means with its IT Services arm, Fujitsu Services. Whilst Fujitsu is a Japanese company,  its strength in Europe has been largely down to the acquisition of UK‐headquartered ICL in 1990. This history leaves  Fujitsu  with  a  sizeable  legacy  business  of  hosting  VME‐based  ICL  mainframes.  Its  historic  strength  lies  in  providing  hosting services to enterprises although it also provides services for SMBs and ISVs.   Fujitsu  has  38  data  centres  in  Europe,  with  locations  in  all  the  major  Western  Europe  countries.  Through  these  it  provides  one‐to‐one  hosting  services  and  shared  hosting  service  via  what  Fujitsu  calls  IaaS  (infrastructure  as  a  service).   As it sells hardware as well as services, Fujitsu favours its own kit when customers do not have a preference and its  infrastructure is based on Fujitsu servers running a range of either Windows, Linux or UNIX based software stacks— Fujitsu reports its business growth in all 3 areas with Microsoft being the strongest.  Its data centres are ISO270001, SAS 70 and ITIL® v2/v3 compliant. It uses a range of charging models, ranging from  per item of hardware to per transaction and unit of power consumed.  http://www.fujitsu.com/global/    7.2.5 IBM  IBM provides managed hosting services as part of its systems integration arm, IBM Global Services (IGS). IGS has 11  data centres in Europe, having consolidated from over 100 in the late 1990s, improving its already respected service  levels.  IBM’s  managed  hosting  services  are  aimed  mainly  at  its  enterprise  customers,  although  it  does  serve  small  and  medium  sized  businesses  but  mainly  through  the  provision  of  specific  hosted  applications  servers,  for  example  for  email and CRM.  IBM has over 90,000 servers under management, with around 70% running Windows, 25% UNIX (mainly IBM’s own  AIX) and just 5% Linux.  http://www.ibm.com/        ©Quocirca 2009  Page 17       
  • 18. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    7.2.6 Logica  Logica  is  a  pan‐European  systems  integrator,  which  doubled  in  size  in  2002  by  merging  with  the  Dutch  consulting  giant  CMG.  In  2006,  it  acquired  WM‐Data,  a  Nordic  SI,  which  brought  with  it  further  infrastructure  management  capabilities.  Logica  offers  managed  hosting  services  to  its  customers  as  part  of  broader  systems  integration  engagements. Its focus is primarily enterprise and public sector where it offers a broad range of services from pure  infrastructure provision to more application‐oriented services.  Logica’s  long  history  leaves  it  with  a  legacy  mainframe  hosting  business.  It  still  sees  some  growth  in  demand  for  hosting and managing customers’ own kit and one‐to‐one hosting, but 50% of its managed hosting services are now  based on shared infrastructure, where it sees strong growth, and expects this to evolve into a cloud‐based offering. It  charges for its hosting platform on a fixed price basis.  All data centres are ISO27001 and managed to ITIL® level 2, with level 3 training in progress. SAS 70 compliance is  offered, but only where the customer demands.  http://www.logica.com/    7.2.7 Orange Business Services  Orange  Business  Services  (OBS)  is  part  of  the  France  Telecom  Group.  It  has  data  centres  in  France,  UK  and  Switzerland. On a pan‐European basis its services are targeted primarily at large enterprises, although in France it is a  prominent provider to SMB and public sector customers.  Its  services  include  both  one‐to‐one  hosting  and  shared  infrastructure,  including  Microsoft,  Linux  and  UNIX  based  platforms. It reports growth in demand for Linux but says that the biggest growth area is for virtualised infrastructure,  whatever the operating system.  All  its  data  centres  are  SAS  70  certified  and  OBS  has  achieved  ISO27001  and  ISO20000  compliance.  Its  global  management procedures are aligned with ITIL® v2 best practice and ITIL® v3 is under consideration. In the past OBS  has offered mainly fixed price contracts but is moving more toward per MIP or per user pricing.  http://www.orange‐business.com/    7.2.8 T‐Systems  T‐Systems  provide  a  wide  range  of  hosted  services  as  part  of  its  broader  IT  services  delivery  focussed  mainly  on  enterprises. T‐Systems’ presence is mainly in Germany and Eastern Europe, where it focussed its main effort in selling  its hosted services. T‐Systems did not provide any direct input for this report.  http://www.t‐systems.com/      ©Quocirca 2009  Page 18       
  • 19. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    7.3 Type 3—internet service providers with managed hosting services  Many ISPs have developed what were initially web hosting services to offer managed hosting.    7.3.1 Claranet  Claranet has data centres in the all the major western European countries and targets its service at businesses of all  sizes. Currently around half of its business is the provision of one‐to‐one managed servers, with both Windows and  Linux in equal measure, and a small number of UNIX deployments. These servers are owned and managed by Claranet  on behalf of its customers. It also provides shared infrastructure and is building a cloud platform where high growth is  expected. Claranet’s data centres are all fully ITIL® v3 compliant.  Claranet  charges  a  fixed  price  per  server  under  management,  be  it  a  physical  server  or  a  virtual  server  or  per  application instance, with additional charges based on the number of transactions and volumes of data handled.  http://www.uk.clara.net/    7.3.2 COLT  COLT provides integrated managed services that enable its customers to outsource their IT infrastructure to any of its  network of data centres across Europe. This includes server, web server, database, email and storage management.  An “Enterprise Cloud” offering is currently being rolled‐out.    COLT's charging models vary depending on the type of service provided. Dedicated infrastructure deployments tend  to have a one‐time set‐up fee with monthly charges for the duration of the contract. Cloud services will be charged  for on a pay‐as‐you go basis, scaling up or down depending on customer requirement.     COLT’s data centres are ISO27001 compliant and managed to ITIL® v2 level.    http://www.colt.net/    7.3.3 Easynet  Easynet has 20,000 square meters of data centre space under management across all the major Western European  countries.  Its  hosting  services  are  targeted  at  businesses  of  all  sizes,  including  ISVs.  Half  its  hosting  business  is  the  provision  of  one‐to‐one  managed  servers,  mainly  running  Windows  or  Linux,  with  some  UNIX  where  demand  is  declining  in  favour  of  Linux.  Easynet  also  provides  hosting  services  based  on  shared  infrastructure.  Easynet’s  data  centres  are  all  ISO27001,  SAS  70  and  ITIL®  Level  3  compliant.  Easynet  has  built  PCI‐compliant  applications  for  customers that require it.  Easynet charges a fixed price per server under management, virtual or physical, and there are incremental charges on  top  of  this  based  on  transactions  and  the  volume  of  data  processed.  Easynet  says  it  buys  all  of  its  power  from  providers using renewable sources, for example hydro‐electric in Germany, and its data centres are in major cities, i.e.  close to centre of employment.  http://www.easynet.com/    7.3.4 Global Crossing  Global Crossing (GC) is best known for its global IP and data network services and it is new to the managed hosting  market in Europe. Much of its experience comes though the acquisition of Impsat, a Latin American managed services  provider. This means that currently GC has 15 data centres in the Americas and it has just two in Europe, both opened  in the last 9 months. GC is able to use its own global fibre network to support broad geographic requirements of its  customers, making use of other carrier’s networks when necessary.  Its focus is the provision of one‐to‐one hosting services to enterprises, mid‐market organisations, governments and  ISVs.  GC  is  sceptical  on  the  uptake  of  cloud  computing  and  thinks  that  utility  computing  will  not  be  via  a  shared  platform.  ©Quocirca 2009  Page 19       
  • 20. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    Standards compliance is a work in progress; ITIL® v2 is in place and v3 is being worked on, as is ISO270001. SAS 70  audits  are  periodically  carried  out  for  its  main  data  centres.  GC  described  its  pricing  model  as  “bespoke  per  customer”. GC believes the monitoring and reporting it provides for its customers is a differentiator.  http://www.globalcrossing.com/     7.3.5 Hostway  Hostway has four data centres in Europe and others in North America, Australia and South Korea. It provides services  for enterprises, SMBs and ISVs and is part of the IBM ‘SaaS incubation programme’ and a Microsoft Service Provider  partner.  Hostway  provides  one‐to‐one  hosting  and  shared  infrastructure  services  and  has  developed  a  cloud  computing  platform. It believes that the provision of utility computing services based on shared infrastructure sold either directly  or via SaaS‐based ISVs applications is the future. Two thirds of its infrastructure is Microsoft‐based where demand is  growing fastest; the rest is Linux.  Hostway  is  currently  seeking  both  ISO27001  and  ITIL®  v3  compliance  and  is  ISO9001  accredited.  For  one‐to‐one  hosting,  Hostway  generally agrees  a  fixed  price  per hardware  item  or  by  volume  of  data processed,  but  for  shared  infrastructure services it is moving more to consumption based pricing—per transaction, per user, per unit of time.  http://hostway.co.uk/    7.4 Ones to watch  This final section lists some of the MHPs Quocirca spoke to which have not been included above but may be in the  next version of this report.  7.4.1 2e2  2e2  is  an  IT  services  provider  that  moved  into  managed  hosting  through  the  acquisition  of  Netstore  in  2008.  It  is  primarily focussed on the UK market, providing support across Europe through partnerships. 2e2 is a Microsoft ISV  incubator partner.  http://www.2e2.com/  7.4.2 PEER1  A  US‐based  MHP,  just  setting  up  in  Europe,  it  has  2  brands;  PEER1  itself  which  is  a  Microsoft‐based  shared  infrastructure platform and Server Beach which provides dedicated servers, usually Linux based.  http://www.peer1.com/  7.4.3 eLINIA  Has  3  UK‐based  data  centres;  for  its  main  data  centre  in  Slough  it  uses  a  co‐location provider  called  Equinix  which  buys  its  power  from  the  Slough  Heat  and  Power  Energy  Centre.  eLINIA  reports  a  sharp  growth  in  cloud‐based  offerings over dedicated infrastructure and requirements for Microsoft growing faster than Linux and UNIX.  http://www.elinia.com/  7.4.4 Centrinet  Centrinet provides a data centre facility in Lincoln, UK, which is called “Smartbunker”. Its electricity is provided by a  nearby wind powered energy supplier.  http://www.centri.net/   7.4.5 OpSource  OpSource is a US‐based MHP that set up in Europe in 2004 and is focussed purely on the ISV market. OpSource has  recently received a $10M investment from NTT Europe Online to help expansion in Europe.  http://www.opsource.net/    ©Quocirca 2009  Page 20       
  • 21. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009      About NTT Europe Online    NTT  Europe  Online  provides  managed  hosting,  security  and  application  management  for  dynamic  enterprises  internationally. These services provide the reliability, availability, security and scalability needed to underpin business  success online.  NTT Europe Online designs managed hosting solutions with the customer’s business needs in mind. These solutions  are  built  around  ITIL®,  ISO20000,  PRINCE2,  ISO  27001  certification  for  information  security  management  and  best  practice guidelines.  As part of NTT Communications, NTT Europe Online has the global reach and scale to support businesses of all sizes.  NTT  Communications  is  the  global  data  and  IP  services  arm  of  the  Fortune  Global  500  telecom  leader,  Nippon  Telegraph & Telephone Corporation (NYSE: NTT).  NTT was ranked no. 1 among the top 10 telecom companies worldwide by Standard and Poors with a Credit Rating of  “AA”.  NTT  also  has  approximately  $9  billion  in  cash  cushioning  it  from  many  of  the  issues  created  by  the  current  financial situation.  NTT Europe Online’s solutions include:  • Managed Hosting in single, dual or multi‐tiered infrastructures  • Managed Hosting in multiple environments (production, pre‐production, development etc)  • Managed Hosting in redundant and resilient configurations  • Multi‐site environments  • Application Management: management of a range of software  • Global IP Network: NTT owns and manages its Global Tier 1 Network architecture  • Business  Continuity:  clustering,  global  load  balancing,  built‐in  redundancy,  mirroring,  multi‐site  solutions,  multi‐environment solutions and disaster recovery  • Virtualisation:  managed  virtualisation  solutions  for  flexibly  scaling  solutions  up  and  down  in  line  with  business demands  • Content  Delivery  Network:  caching  network  manages  the  surges  in  web  traffic  that  can  lead  to  service  disruption  • Security: range of unified threat management (UTM) services  • SaaS:  infrastructure  for  Software  as  a  Service  in  conjunction  with  Microsoft,  Sun,  Oracle  and  other  application partners  • Data Centre Services: world class data centre services from 27 major cities globally, including eight in Europe  • User defined Service Level Agreements that cover the entire solution, not just components    http://www.ntteuropeonline.com/      ©Quocirca 2009  Page 21       
  • 22. Managed hosting in Europe  June 2009    About Quocirca  REPORT NOTE: Quocirca is a primary research and analysis company specialising in the  business  impact  of  information  technology  and  communications  (ITC).  This report has been written With  world‐wide,  native  language  reach,  Quocirca  provides  in‐depth  independently by Quocirca Ltd insights into the views of buyers and influencers in large, mid‐sized and  to provide an overview of the small  organisations.  Its  analyst  team  is  made  up  of  real‐world  managed hosting market. practitioners with firsthand experience of ITC delivery who continuously  The report draws on Quocirca’s research and track the industry and its real usage in the markets.  extensive knowledge of the Through researching perceptions, Quocirca uncovers the real hurdles to  technology and business technology  adoption—the  personal  and  political  aspects  of  an  arenas, and provides advice on organisation’s  environment  and  the  pressures  of  the  need  for  the approach that organisations demonstrable  business  value  in  any  implementation.  This  capability  to  should take to benefit from uncover  and  report  back  on  the  end‐user  perceptions  in  the  market  managed hosting. enables  Quocirca  to advise on  the  realities  of  technology  adoption, not  Quocirca would like to thank the promises.  NTT Europe Online for its Quocirca  research  is  always  pragmatic,  business  orientated  and  sponsorship of this report and conducted  in  the  context  of  the  bigger  picture.  ITC  has  the  ability  to  the NTT Europe Online transform businesses and the processes that drive them, but often fails  customers who have provided to  do  so.  Quocirca’s  mission  is  to  help  organisations  improve  their  their time and help in the success  rate  in  process  enablement  through  better  levels  of  preparation of the case studies. understanding  and  the  adoption  of  the  correct  technologies  at  the    correct time.  Quocirca  has  a  pro‐active  primary  research  programme,  regularly  surveying users, purchasers and resellers of ITC products and services on  emerging, evolving and maturing technologies. Over time, Quocirca has  built  a  picture  of  long  term  investment  trends,  providing  invaluable  information for the whole of the ITC community.  Quocirca  works  with  global  and  local  providers  of  ITC  products  and  services to help them deliver on the promise that ITC holds for business.  Quocirca’s  clients  include  Oracle,  Microsoft,  IBM,  O2,  T‐Mobile,  HP,  Xerox,  EMC,  Symantec  and  Cisco,  along  with  other  large  and  medium  sized vendors, service providers and more specialist firms.  Details  of  Quocirca’s  work  and  the  services  it  offers  can  be  found  at  http://www.quocirca.com      ©Quocirca 2009  Page 22       

×