Microsoft Virtualization Overview
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Microsoft Virtualization Overview

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  • Rather than adding virtualization code largely on top of Windows, as Virtual Server does, Windows Server virtualization makes supporting virtual machines part of Windows itself. This new approach provides a hypervisor that runs directly on the hardware. One or more partitions can then be created on top of the hypervisor, each providing a VM. One of these, the parent partition, must run Windows Server 2008. Child partitions (which are really just virtual machines) can run any other supported operating system, including various Windows versions and Linux distributions such as SUSE Linux. To create and manage new partitions, an administrator can use an MMC snap-in running in the parent partition.
  • As in Windows Server 2003, a user of Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services can create a virtual session with a complete desktop. While this is the only choice in the 2003 release, the new TS RemoteApp capability also lets a 2008 user create a virtual session containing just a single remote application, as the figure shows. If a Windows user creates a virtual session with a complete desktop, that desktop and all of its applications appear in a window on top of her local desktop. With TS RemoteApp, however, the application’s user interface appears on her local desktop just as if the application were running locally. In fact, an application accessed via TS RemoteApp appears in the Task Bar like a local application, and it can also be launched like one: from the Start menu, through a shortcut, or in some other way.
  • There are a number of key features in Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services, including Windows Server ® 2008 Terminal Services RemoteApp, Terminal Services Gateway and Terminal Services Web Access that greatly enhance the solution. The functionality provided by these features is as follows; Terminal Services RemoteApp™ applications appear no different than local applications. They work seamlessly with the task bar and new Windows Vista® features like 3-D flip. TS RemoteApp helps improve end-user productivity and reduces training requirements. Terminal Services Gateway more securely connects applications and data to users outside the firewall and helps provide simple and highly secure delivery of critical applications and data to mobile employees without a VPN. Terminal Services Web Access simplifies application deployment by making applications available from a web page or a SharePoint portal without installing them on the local PC. Speed application deployment by quickly connecting users with the applications they need. Terminal Services Session Broker delivers session-based load-balancing to a TS Farm. TS Session Broker helps bring better uptime and performance to your TS environment. Terminal Services Easy Print leverages the client-side print driver (no server side driver needed) to enable fast and reliable printing to a local or network-attached printer. End users can more productively work from remote locations.
  • While both Virtual Server and Windows Server virtualization provide tools for managing their VMs, these tools work on only a single physical machine. Once an organization has more than a handful of VMs spread across different physical machines, a centralized console for managing them is likely to be attractive. Virtual Machine Manager provides this central console, allowing many VMs to be managed from a single point. An administrator can use this console to check the status of a VM, see exactly what’s running in that virtual machine, move VMs from one physical machine to another, and perform other management tasks. And although the console provides a graphical interface, this interface is built entirely on Microsoft’s PowerShell scripting tool. Anything that can be done graphically can also be done from the command line using this language
  • Looking at each virtualization technology in isolation is useful, since it’s the simplest way to understand each one. Yet using these technologies together is useful, too. This slide shows an example scenario that combines hardware virtualization, presentation virtualization, and application virtualization. In this example, the system on the left uses hardware virtualization provided by Virtual Server. One VM is running a workload on Linux, while the other is running the SoftGrid Server on Windows. This server provides virtual applications to other systems in this organization. The machine at the top of the figure, for example, might be a desktop, laptop, or server machine, and some of its applications are SoftGrid virtual applications streamed on demand. The system at the bottom is providing presentation virtualization using Terminal Services, and all of the applications it runs are packaged as virtual applications. As all kinds of virtualization continue to spread, multi-technology scenarios like this will become increasingly common. Plenty of other approaches are possible, too. For example, Windows Vista has built in support for the RDP protocol. This lets Vista provide presentation virtualization without deploying Terminal Services—all that’s needed is a machine to run Vista and clients to display the user interface. Using hardware virtualization, it’s possible to run many copies of Vista on a single server, each in its own VM and each used remotely by one user. When those users go home at the end of their work day, an administrator could use Virtual Machine Manager to store these VMs, then load other VMs running some other workload, such as overnight batch processing. When the next workday starts, each user’s desktop can then be restored. This hosted desktop approach can allow using hardware more efficiently, and it can also help simplify management of a distributed environment.
  • © 2008 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION. 04/02/10
  • There are a number of key features in Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services, including Windows Server ® 2008 Terminal Services RemoteApp, Terminal Services Gateway and Terminal Services Web Access that greatly enhance the solution. The functionality provided by these features is as follows; Terminal Services RemoteApp™ applications appear no different than local applications. They work seamlessly with the task bar and new Windows Vista® features like 3-D flip. TS RemoteApp helps improve end-user productivity and reduces training requirements. Terminal Services Gateway more securely connects applications and data to users outside the firewall and helps provide simple and highly secure delivery of critical applications and data to mobile employees without a VPN. Terminal Services Web Access simplifies application deployment by making applications available from a web page or a SharePoint portal without installing them on the local PC. Speed application deployment by quickly connecting users with the applications they need. Terminal Services Session Broker delivers session-based load-balancing to a TS Farm. TS Session Broker helps bring better uptime and performance to your TS environment. Terminal Services Easy Print leverages the client-side print driver (no server side driver needed) to enable fast and reliable printing to a local or network-attached printer. End users can more productively work from remote locations.
  • If virtualization reduced other costs but led to increased management effort, it would likely be a net loss—people cost more than machines. Operations Manager can manage virtual machines as well as physical machines. In fact, the product works in the same way in both cases. Operations Manager relies on an agent that runs on each machine it manages, and so every machine—physical or virtual—has one.
  • Challenging as it is in the physical world, managing software configurations can become even more challenging once virtualization is on the scene. Creating more virtual machines, for example, means more machines whose software must be updated. Effective configuration management becomes even more important in this environment. Like Operations Manager, Configuration Manager approaches the physical and virtual worlds in the same way. Rather than requiring separate tools for managing software configuration in these separate environments, Configuration Manager applies the same technology to both. As the leftmost system in this figure illustrates, Configuration Manager treats a VM provided by Virtual Server as if it were a physical machine. Software can be installed on this machine, updated as needed, and appear as part of the asset inventory maintained by Configuration Manager. Similarly, this tool works with applications running on a terminal server just like any others.
  • Talking Points: Versatile Physical Virtual Applications Simple Just like Static File Backup Low TCO Harness Current Skills and Practices
  • Physical to Virtual Conversion (P2V). SCVMM Beta 2 allows you to specify a physical Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2000 Server SP1 source machine for conversion to a virtual machine. You can use the virtual machine as a template for new virtual machines.
  • *) with release in CY2008

Microsoft Virtualization Overview Microsoft Virtualization Overview Presentation Transcript

  • Microsoft Virtualization Technologies Sam Youness WW Industry Technology Strategist [email_address]
  • Virtualization… Presentation Application Server Kernel TCP/IP Security … Server .net UI Clustering BitLocker Message Queuing … Features AD IIS … App Role/App
  • Microsoft Virtualization Technologies Application Virtualization Microsoft Application Virtualization Server Virtualization Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V Hyper-V Server Virtual Server Presentation Virtualization Terminal Services Desktop Virtualization Virtual PC and Enterprise Desktop Virtualization VDI and VECD Storage Virtualization Data Protection Manager Windows Storage Server Virtualization Management System Center
  • Microsoft Application Virtualization…
  • Server Virtualization…
    • Benefits:
    • Reduce number of servers
    • Increase server utilization
    • Reduce cost of space requirements, management, power, and hardware
    • Easier to restore failed systems
    • Technologies:
    • Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V
    • Hyper-V Server
    • Virtual Server 2005 R2
  • Hardware Virtualization Windows Server 2008 with Hyper-V Windows Hypervisor Windows 2000 Server . . . SUSE Linux Child Partitions Physical Machine Application Virtual Machine Windows Server 2008 Parent Partition Hardware
  • Presentation Virtualization Windows Server 2008 Terminal Services Windows Server 2008 Hardware Windows Terminal Services RDP RDP Remote Desktop Connection TS RemoteApp Physical Machine Application Virtual Session
  • Key Features in Terminal Services 2008
      • Terminal Services RemoteApp™ .
          • Remote applications appear the same as local applications, improving end-user productivity and reducing training requirements.
      • Terminal Services Gateway.
          • More securely connects applications and data to users without a VPN.
      • Terminal Services Web Access.
          • Simplifies application deployment by making applications available from a web page or a SharePoint portal.
  • Managing a Virtualized Windows Environment SCVMM 2007 Virtual Machine Manager Console Self-Service Portal Guest OS Guest OS Guest OS Guest OS System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2007 Physical Machine Application Virtual Machine Windows Hardware Virtual Server 2005 Windows Hardware Virtual Server 2005
  • Enterprise Topology London Windows ® PowerShell Administrator Console Web-based Delegated Provisioning UI External Network (DMZ) Singapore Virtual Machine Hosts Remote Library Server
  • Combining Virtualization Technologies App. Virtualization Cache Windows Hardware Virtual Server 2005 Windows Hardware SoftGrid Cache App. Virtual. Server Windows Linux Windows Hardware Windows Terminal Services Virtual Application Physical Machine Application Virtual Machine Virtual Session
  • © 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.
  • Key Features in Terminal Services 2008
      • Terminal Services RemoteApp™ .
          • Remote applications appear the same as local applications, improving end-user productivity and reducing training requirements.
      • Terminal Services Gateway.
          • More securely connects applications and data to users without a VPN.
      • Terminal Services Web Access.
          • Simplifies application deployment by making applications available from a web page or a SharePoint portal.
  • Managing a Virtualized Windows Environment Operations Manager Console SCOM 2007 Guest OS Virtual Application Physical Machine Application SoftGrid Cache Windows Hardware System Center Operations Manager 2007 Windows Hardware Virtual Server 2005 Windows Hardware Windows Terminal Services Virtual Machine Virtual Session
  • Managing a Virtualized Windows Environment SCCM 2007 Configuration Manager Console Guest OS System Center Configuration Manager 2007 SoftGrid Cache Windows Hardware Windows Hardware Virtual Server 2005 Windows Hardware Windows Terminal Services Virtual Application Physical Machine Application Virtual Machine Virtual Session
  • System Center Virtual Machine Manager Host Groups VM Views Context Sensitive Actions Live Thumbnail Centralized Library Familiar Interface
  • System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2007 Key Functionality
      • Host Configuration
      • Intelligent Placement
      • Library Management
      • Deployment and Storage
      • Virtual Machine Creation
      • Monitoring and Reporting
      • Conversions: P2V and V2V
    • Automation with PowerShell
      • Delegation and Self Service
  • Siemens Standard Drives Siemens Standard Drives is a production arm of the international electronics company. Based in Congleton, United Kingdom, the business manufactures variable speed drives in a 24-hour production environment. All the factory’s computer and test systems are networked, with data passing through a primary and a secondary set of servers and storage. Server availability is crucial, because if the IT infrastructure goes down, production stops. The company’s servers were increasing in number, but physical space and power were in short supply, and management was becoming difficult. It was running a VMware virtualization solution, but the cost was prohibitive, so the IT team worked with Microsoft Gold Certified Partner Silversands to deploy Hyper-V technology, saving money, space, and energy. BASF IT Services BASF IT Services supports networks and computers for nearly 60,000 users worldwide. The company followed an expensive certification process to ensure flawless operation of the applications it makes available—but the careful certification process was delaying the delivery of applications. BASF IT Services needed a way to shorten application deployment time while still keeping certification at the same high level of quality. The IT service provider found a solution in software virtualization technology. Microsoft SoftGrid Application Virtualization accelerates the certification process and reduces overhead considerably by delivering applications to customer PCs dynamically. Virtualization is invisible to users, who receive their new applications and updates sooner than before and can remain confident that the new software is compatible with their existing applications.
  • AspenTech AspenTech is a leading provider of process optimization software and services. Its integrated aspenONE solutions enable manufacturers to reduce costs, increase capacity and optimize operational performance throughout the engineering, plant operations and supply chain management processes. AspenTech wanted to reduce deployment time of aspenONE to allow process manufacturing customers to leverage new software capabilities more quickly, while streamlining interoperability testing and version upgrades. AspenTech implemented Microsoft Application Virtualization and the company has been able to: Reduce deployment time up to 50 percent, speeding customer adoption of new aspenONE applications and version upgrades Provide more effective customer support Enable customers to streamline software testing by reducing interoperability challenges between desktop applications Help customers improve applications management
  • Virtual Server 2005 vs. Hyper-V