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Pcc Hardware Comp

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MRRL's Competencies training files

MRRL's Competencies training files

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  • 1. PCC Training Track – Lesson 1
    • Hardware
  • 2. Hardware
    • Objectives
    • Understand basic hardware & peripherals
    • Understand connections for components
    • Understand start-up and shut-down procedures
    • Understand how to reboot
    • Understand removable storage options
    • Know how to get more help
  • 3.
    • Understand basic hardware & peripherals
    • Identify & use monitor, mouse & keyboard
    • Identify & use CD/DVD drive & USB ports
    • Use headphones
    • Identify a printer and a scanner
  • 4.
    • Identify & use monitor, mouse & keyboard
    A Computer Monitor An output device that displays the visual output of the computer. The pictured model is an LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) flat-panel monitor. Bigger, CRT (Cathode Ray Tube) monitors are being used much less often due to heating & space issues (and LCD prices dropping). http://www.flickr.com/photos/jhat/80371024/ - Joe Hatfield
  • 5.
    • Identify & use monitor, mouse & keyboard
    A Mouse An input device that moves the cursor on a computer monitor's screen and includes various buttons and scroll wheels on more fancy models. Roller ball mice are being phased out in favor of optical mice. Roller balls were used as mechanical positioning devices on the bottom of the mouse, now laser light is used to determine the movement of the mouse on the surface across which it moves. http://www.flickr.com/photos/williamhook/2778794704/ - William Hook Optical Mouse – uses laser light
  • 6. Identify & use monitor, mouse & keyboard http://img.systemaxdev.com A keyboard is also an input device. You can use a keyboard to input text or numbers into the computer. Keyboards have 102 keys standard, but many keyboard makers put in extra keys for convenience. All US keyboards have “F” keys above the number row that do various functions (F11 makes most windows go full screen, F5 refreshes a browser page, etc.), some of which are program-specific, others are universal to the Windows Operating System.
  • 7. Identify & use CD/DVD drive & USB ports A CD/DVD drive like the one installed on each of our PCC computers can play both Compact Disks (CDs) and Digital Video Discs (DVDs). The ones in the PCC can also “burn” information onto a writable CD. The button at the bottom-right of the picture above is the open/close button. The small pin-hole above and to the right of that (check one of our computers if you can’t see the image above clearly) is a release hole. Inserting a straightened paper clip into this hole will force a locked drive to open and release the CD or DVD inside. No CDs or DVDs that require installing a program will work on our machines. *Field Trip* Take one of the writeable CDs from the case at the PCC desk (or a CD that you have close at hand) and open and insert the CD into a nearby computer. Close the CD drive (using the button, not by pushing it closed), then reopen it and remove the CD. From HP’s website
  • 8. Identify & use CD/DVD drive & USB ports A Universal Serial Bus (USB) port is included in all modern computers. It connects many different peripheral devices (scanners, digital cameras, MP3 players, etc) to the computer. Below is pictured a standard USB port, the USB connector – shown beside that – is pressed (gently!) into the port to make the connection. Notice the white bars in the port and the white bar in the USB connector on the right. Those make sure that the USB connector is inserted correctly. Pushing too hard on the connector to get it into the port will cause damage. *Field Trip* Find a USB device (the floppy disk drive, if you are on the PCC desk, or a USB Stick or Flash Drive) and hook it into the nearest computer correctly. http://www.flickr.com/photos/hippie/2561854165/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacobgarcia/2550146/
  • 9. Use Headphones Headphones are an output device for the computer, much like the monitor is. The monitor displays visual information, the headphones let the user listen to audio information *privately*. The headphones on the left are a standard, over the ear model. The headphones below are called earbuds and fit into the ear. http://www.flickr.com/photos/mwboeckmann/1350246228/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/20273123@N00/415022898/
  • 10. Use Headphones Headphones come with jacks at the end of the cables that run from the ears. Those jacks, like the ones below, are almost always universal. What works in one device or computer will work in another. All computers in our PCC have a port in the front of the computer, like the ones to the right, for headphone jacks. To use a set of headphones, you put the jack into the port that is marked with a set of headphones next to it (or above it). If there is a microphone on the headset, that jack goes into the port with a microphone next to it. Microphones are not allowed in the PCC. http://www.flickr.com/photos/psychostore/2682131726/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/hippie/2561854165/ Often, the headphone port will be colored green and the microphone port will be pink. Occasionally those jacks are also colored on the headset, too.
  • 11. Use Headphones
    • PCC Adult’s Machines (1-30) have audio ports on the front of the machine
    • PCC Children’s Machines have audio ports on the back of the machine
    • The Children’s Headphones should be tied into the back of the machine to avoid theft
    • Patrons using an Adult machine need to bring their own headphones – we don’t provide them
  • 12. Identify a Printer & a Scanner Printer – output device that produces paper hard copies. Scanner – input device that digitizes paper or other flat “real-world” objects. http://www.flickr.com/photos/svenreed/2275896061/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/evanhamilton/2310747424/
  • 13. Understand connections for components
    • Know which socket to use for each component we offer & how to verify that cables are connected (Floppy Drive, CD & USB)
    • Identify the network connection & determine if it is properly connected
    • Provide basic assistance to patrons for wireless network connections
  • 14. Know which socket to use for each component we offer
    • Refer back to slide # 7 for a picture of a CD drive
    • Refer back to slide # 8 for a picture of a USB port
    • Refer back to slide # 10 for a picture of an audio jack
  • 15. Know which socket to use for each component we offer
    • Old-style keyboards and mice use serial ports which are found on the back of the computer.
    • Do NOT connect serial devices while the computer is running.
    • We use USB ports for mice and keyboards on all PCC computers now
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mag3737/535612564/
  • 16. Know how to verify that cables are connected
    • The best way to verify cable connections is to unplug, then replug
    • All USB connections can be unplugged or plugged in while the computer is on – called “hotplugging” devices
    • *Field Trip* - go to a computer and identify USB connections, serial connections (if they are there) and audio connections
  • 17. Identify the network connection http://www.flickr.com/photos/awiesi/136335936/ Network Port (with status lights) Network Cable There is a notch at the top of the port. The cable has to go into the port one way and one way only, so that the clip on the cable fits into the notch on the port. To remove a network cable, press down on the clip to pull it out of the port. http://www.flickr.com/photos/fr3d/216315692/
  • 18. Determine if network is properly connected
    • Check the status lights – green & blinking is good
    • Remove & reinsert cable
    • Check to see if another website will load (I use CNN) to see if the issue is with the individual website or the network
    • Call for help
  • 19. Provide basic assistance to patrons for wireless connections
    • Read through the 6 short pages of a Wi-Fi connection tutorial for XP or the one page tutorial for Vista
    • XP or Vista
    • And then return to this lesson. Remember, patrons are responsible for their own laptops, we cannot support non-standard setups.
  • 20. Understand start-up and shut-down procedures
    • Properly start up & log into computer that is off
    • Know how to determine if computer & peripherals are plugged in, powered on
    • Follow standard procedure for powering down computer
  • 21. Properly start up & log into computer that is off
    • Press the power button on the front of the computer
    • PCC machines: have autologin – your job is done
    • Staff & desk machines: press the Ctrl+Alt+Del keys at the same time to bring up the login box
    • Enter your user name and password, click OK
  • 22. Know how to determine if computer & peripherals are plugged in, powered on
    • Lights are your friend. Computers that are on have a green light below the power button
    • Most peripherals also have a light to indicate they are on
    • Refer to slide # 16 to review how to verify cables are connected
    • Follow the power cable from the back of the computer/peripheral to the wall/power strip to confirm it is plugged in
  • 23. Follow standard procedure for powering down computer
    • In PCC
      • Press power button on computer until the machine turns off (5 to 10 seconds) or
      • In Envisionware go to Utilities menu and choose View Connected Clients
      • Click on computer name to select, then press Shut Down Client button
      • Select Shut Down Computer radio button
      • Select Shut Down All Connected Computers to turn off all lab machines
  • 24. Follow standard procedure for powering down computer
    • At Staff Desk machines
      • Go to the Start button at the lower-left corner of your screen
      • Click Shut Down at the bottom right of the menu bar
      • Choose Shut Down from menu and click OK
    • If your machine uses Windows XP, pressing the power button is acceptable – wait 5-10 seconds for power down to complete.
  • 25. Understand how to reboot
    • Know difference between hard & soft reboot
    • Know when each should be performed
  • 26. Know difference between hard & soft reboot
    • Hard Reboot
      • Aka “cold boot”
      • Turn computer off, then back on, using the front power button
      • Used when the computer is non-responsive and no other method will work
      • Also can be done via unplugging & replugging power cord
    • Soft Reboot
      • AKA “warm boot”
      • Use Start Menu to Reboot computer automatically (using Reboot instead of Shut Down)
      • Used when you want to restart the computer to fix a minor problem
  • 27. Understand removable storage options
    • Recognize USB flash drive, CD-R or RW disk, DVD, Floppy disk & Zip disk
    • Know storage capacity & limitations of each
    • Know which devices we support
    • Identify which drives are mapped to external storage devices
    • Be able to assist patron with each device
  • 28. Recognize USB flash drive, CD-R or RW disk, DVD, Floppy disk & Zip disk Removable storage that uses the USB connection on computers to work Generally small and easy to carry Comes in many different storage capacities – ours are 128MB, 64GB drives are on the market now http://www.flickr.com/photos/purpleslog/891442315/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/kansirnet/299416134/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/programwitch/1266246055/
  • 29. Recognize USB flash drive, CD-R or RW disk, DVD, Floppy disk & Zip disk Compact Disks are either CD-R or CD-RW format. CD-R disks can be “burned” once. CD-RW disks can be “burned” multiple times. Despite that, CD-RWs are not as good as USB drives for repeated uses. They hold around 750MB of data. Most CD-Rs and RWs have the format printed on the label side of the disk. http://www.flickr.com/photos/comphacker/3060861951/
  • 30. Recognize USB flash drive, CD-R or RW disk, DVD, Floppy disk & Zip disk A DVD can hold from 4GB of data to 17GB, depending if it is 1-sided or 2-sided. We do not have DVD burners in the PCC, but patrons can play already burned DVDs in our machines. http://www.flickr.com/photos/bpt/76899972/
  • 31. Recognize USB flash drive, CD-R or RW disk, DVD, Floppy disk & Zip disk A floppy disk can hold up to 1.4MB of data. We no longer have floppy drives in our computers, but we do have some USB connected external drives that people can use. Because Floppy Disks tend to be unreliable, USB flash drives are recommended. http://www.flickr.com/photos/harshadsharma/44793133/
  • 32. Recognize USB flash drive, CD-R or RW disk, DVD, Floppy disk & Zip disk Zip disks are becoming very rare. They come in 100MB and 250MB sizes, but are almost never used. We do still have one external Zip drive available in the PCC. *Field Trip* Go to the PCC and examine the Floppy & Zip disk drives behind the desk (in the printout cabinet). Notice how much thicker the Zip drive is. Zip disks are more than twice as thick as a Floppy disk. http://www.flickr.com/photos/flickerbulb/136053335
  • 33. Know storage capacity & limitations of each
    • Storage Terms
      • Kilobyte  Megabyte  Gigabyte  Terabyte
      • Each one is 1000 times larger than the next
      • Eg: 1MB (Megabyte) = 1000 KB (Kilobytes)
      • Eg: 1GB (Gigabyte) = 1000 MB
      • Eg: 1TB (Terabyte) = 1000 GB
  • 34. Know storage capacity & limitations of each
    • Storage comparisons:
      • Floppy Disk – (1.4MB) hold the equivalent of a small book
      • Zip Disk – (250MB) hold the equivalent of a shelf of books (178 books)
      • CD-R – (750MB) hold the equivalent of an few shelves of books (535 books)
      • DVD – (4GB) hold the equivalent of a range of books (2857 books)
      • USB – comes in all of the above storage capacities plus more
  • 35. Know which devices we support
    • Floppy drive (we don’t sell floppy disks)
    • Zip drive (we don’t sell zip disks)
    • CD-R/RW Drive – CD-R’s are $2 each
    • DVD Drive (we don’t sell or support burnable DVDs)
    • USB Drive – MRRL logo 128MB flash drives are available for $15 each
  • 36. Identify which drives are mapped to external storage devices
    • Drive Mapping – a way for Windows to associate a letter with a storage device, either local or over a network.
    • Drive letters = mapped drives (C is always mapped to hard drive, etc.)
    • Floppy drive = A
    • Zip Drive = B
    • CD Drive = D
    • USB Drive = F or G
  • 37. Be able to assist patron with each device
    • Field Trip!
    • Log into a PCC machine
    • Attach a Floppy disk drive, a Zip disk drive and a USB flash drive, one at a time to the machine
    • Note which drive letters are mapped to which device
  • 38. Know how to get more help
    • Know whom to contact for more help with library computers
    • Know where to find contact information
    • Be able to describe problem & steps already taken to address it
  • 39. Know whom to contact for more help with library computers http://www.flickr.com/photos/librarianbyday/2655777035/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/travelinlibrarian/2551749338/ NIKKI! ROBIN!
  • 40. Know where to find contact information
    • Staffweb – http://www.staffweb.mrrl.org/contact.php
    • Robin & Nikki have phone extensions, email addresses and cell phone numbers (please don’t call Nikki on her cell, though…)
  • 41. Be able to describe problem & steps already taken to address it
    • Know the computer name (or at least specifics about whose desk the computer is on)
    • Know *exactly* the steps leading to the error
    • Be prepared to explain what you did to try to fix the problem
    • Know what the error message is (pressing the “print screen” button on your keyboard and pasting the screen into a Word doc is a great way to avoid writing long, complicated errors down)
    • Enter all that into a Trouble Ticket (at http://staffweb.mrrl.org/trouble/ ) or email to Robin or Nikki
  • 42. Hardware Quiz
    • Go to http://www.classmarker.com/my_tests.php
    • Take the quiz for the Hardware Section of this course from that page (after you log in). Your responses will be mailed to Robin. Finish the other courses in this track to get your PCC Tech Certificate.

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