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Virtualização - VMWare
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Virtualização - VMWare

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  • The Traditional Model Of IT…..has become inoperable The overwhelming complexity of today’s infrastructure is what keeps IT occupied most of the time; fighting fires, running routine maintenance is a task fraught with complexity No room to manoeuver In today’s highly automated, technology-enabled economy, business capability has become inextricably linked to IT capability. As IT infrastructure has become increasingly complex, it can best be described as inflexible, brittle, and costly. In fact, the typical company spends upwards of 70% - 80% of their IT budgets to simply maintain the status-quo, leaving the business starved for new and updated capabilities. We have reached a point where business opportunity is literally trapped in IT infrastructure.
  • The VMware goal is to eliminate this complexity, turn IT into a ubiquitously available service – within 3 main operating principles. We turn IT into a service while still maintaining the lowest possible costs (providing IT as a service with maximum efficiency and lowest operational overhead) We make it easy for IT to provide and maintain operational control over service levels they provide to the business We enable IT to become a service provider without locking IT into any specific application, OS or hardware architecture. We turn IT into a service – in a future proof manner
  • To break the trend of ever-decreasing flexibility, combined with ever-increasing costs – caused by the excessive hardware and plumbing in today’s datacenters, a new model for IT services is beginning to emerge – cloud computing . Cloud computing is a new style of computing where IT infrastructure is available as a ubiquitous, easily accessible, and reliable utility service conceptually similar to the telephone or electricity. Early industry conversations have focused on external, public cloud infrastructure, often focused on a new breed of applications. Most of the commonly available cloud computing options today provide a fast and easy means of getting access to infrastructure at a service – but in most cases, applications have to be rewritten or customized to take advantage of this flexibility. Also, production enterprise datacenters are usually worried about loss of security and control with these new architectures. The reality is that businesses don’t have the luxury of throwing away today’s applications in favor of new architectures. Only VMware is enabling a pragmatic approach, the first step of which is to turn today’s datacenter into an internal cloud. In parallel, VMware is working with hosting and service providers to enable compatible external cloud infrastructures. Through federation and common management services between clouds, VMware presents a seamless, dynamic operating environment. This enables the bridging of internal resources with available external resources, helping businesses achieve the full flexibility and benefits of cloud computing. The result is in essence a private cloud .
  • VMware’s approach brings the benefits of cloud computing – fast deployment, low to $0 upfront cost, easy turn on and off or change, pay as you go, pay for what you use – to internal infrastructure. It creates a win win situation for both business owners and IT – business owners can meet rapidly changing market conditions with a fast deployment mechanism and IT can retain control, manage on a tight budget, yet provide flexible, scalable computing to the business This approach also has significant advantages over other cloud computing models that have proprietary interfaces and require custom application development (thereby creating lock in). It not only retains the flexibility of hosting existing or future apps without customization, but also can leverage and evolve existing skillsets to this new model. The private cloud is a logical entity that spans on site and offsite infrastructure, securely and under IT control – providing the same security of on-premise infrastructure – with the choice of any type of industry standard hardware. Key Benefits: Easy to get started No technology lock in No commitment Lower ongoing costs
  • VMware is using an evolutionary approach to deliver cloud computing internally so IT can transform itself with the least amount of disruption. This is because of the unique position of virtualization in the stack –it is a software substrate that is in the unique position to abstract away hw complexity across the entire datacenter and run existing apps safely encapsulated inside virtual machines Addition of policies and mgmt allows delivery of security, compliance, availability services to existing apps as well as any new apps in a uniform manner and allows true cloud computing to be possible without the need for customization or change. This software substrate – that provides datacenter level virtualization across server, storage and networks –and that provides built in controls for delivering policies – is categorized as a Cloud Operating System because it transforms internal datacenters into cloud infrastructure.
  • Additionally , The Cloud OS provides a common platform for datacenters and service providers, linked through federation and standards based interaction allowing the creation of private clouds leveraging common management services This allows datacenters to retain the choice of how they provide computing…without getting locked out of external clouds at a later date The key things that make the VMware cloud vision different from most other competitors in the industry are the following: Use your existing infrastructure and existing skillsets; across existing apps and new apps No need to rewrite applications - Companies like Google, MS etc require you to rewrite your applications and once in their cloud, you’re locked in. “hotel california – checkin- but no checkout” With the VMware model – the move to using external infrastructure to host apps can be a short term decision without long term consequences. VMware essentially makes cloud computing accessible to enterprises in a future-proof manner
  • With the introduction of VMware vSphere , the industry’s first cloud operating system, VMware paves the path to private clouds. The Cloud OS brings Aggregation and coordination of all underlying resources Dramatic Performance and Scale Integrated Availability & Reliability Integrated Policy & Compliance Extensible Management Self-service Datacenter Manage at Service Level
  • . VMware vSphere™ 4 is the industry’s first cloud operating system, transforming datacenters into dramatically simplified cloud infrastructure and enabling the next generation of flexible, reliable IT services.
  • VMware vSphere™ is a cloud operating system - A cloud operating system is a new category of software that is specifically designed to holistically manage large collections of infrastructure – CPUs, storage, networking – as a seamless, flexible and dynamic operating environment. Analogous to the operating system that manages the complexity of an individual machine, the cloud operating system manages the complexity of a datacenter. Although alternative approaches may be pursued, VMware believes that virtualization is the key underpinning technology to enable the cloud. The cloud OS comprises infrastructure services that transform server, storage and network hardware into a shared resource and application services that are built in and available to all applications that run on it. Also equally important for an OS is the vibrant ecosystem that builds and complements it providing plug and play services to users Note: vCompute, vStorage and vNetwork represent categories of functionality provided by vSphere that abstract and aggregate server, storage and network hardware and allocate it precisely and efficiently to applications. Availability, Security and Scalability represent the categories of services that are provided by vSphere to all virtual machines that run on it.
  • Leveraging VMware’s industry-leading technology and experience, VMware vSphere™ 4 delivers uncompromised control, in the most efficient manner, while fully preserving customer choice. This combination, with VMware’s unique approach for bridging internal and external cloud infrastructures, makes VMware vSphere™ 4 the best solution for achieving the full benefits of cloud computing.
  • The net result is that IT can say “Yes” to delivering new services – on time, within budget and with assured QoS. To a large extent , VMware has already made delivering new business services on time, within budget and with assured QoS a reality at many customers. The above data comes from Qualcomm ( for provisioning and infrastructure cost per app) and Safeco Insurance – two customers that make extensive use of VMware Infrastructure. Several other VMware customers have also started down the path of implementing cloud computing in their organizations with VMware as the platform: Lockheed Martin, T-systems, washington mutual etc are good examples.
  • The transparency of the infrastructure means that in this new world infrastructure can be owned and operated by internal IT, or can be rented from a cloud service provider. If IT want to be out of the business of providing and managing the infrastructure for certain class of applications, new technologies federated the internal and external cloud to provide seamless “flexing” of applications on-premise and off-premise, while guaranteeing the appropriate levels of security. Very importantly this federation of owned and rented infrastructure works for every existing application, and does not require re-architecting or re-writing of existing applications. The decision what applications to run where does not need to be a binary, either/or one. The usability of the future “external cloud” is Amazon EC2-like, but has the SLA’s guarantees, better self-service and application owner control, and a much lighter dynamic and granular business contract than traditional hosting/outsourcing, at x% less cost than traditional infrastructure outsourcing. This internal cloud unlocks new market based economies of scale, service and innovation beyond what currently exists today
  • Let’s take a look at how vSphere 4.0 enables even greater efficiencies in your infrastructure Efficiency is characterized by the elimination of unnecessary investments, achieving lower total cost-of-ownership, and minimizing resource time and investment in managing and maintaining IT infrastructure. Translated into business terms, efficiency drives both capex and opex savings. By leveraging VMware’s leading virtualization solutions, VMware vSphere™ 4 delivers the highest consolidation ratios in the business, with automated management and dynamic optimization of resources across internal and external cloud infrastructures.
  • This is a quick summary of current and new infrastructure Services that deliver greater capital and operational savings than any other virtualization solution. Infrastructure services are components of the cloud OS that abstract away from the underlying server, storage and networking hardware; aggregate them and deliver them precisely as needed to applications At the highest level – vCompute services deliver the most efficient way to virtualize single servers and maximize utilization across and group of servers increasing capital and operational savings. vStorage services deliver abstraction from the type of storage and the most efficient use of storage in virtual environments vNetwok services deliver the most optimal way to integrate networking in virtual environments
  • Several mechanisms already exist in VMware ESX making it the most efficient way to virtualize. ESX and ESXi virtualize every resource with the lowest possible overhead A purpose built scheduler and use of hardware assist technologies for optimizing CPU access Transparent page sharing/ballooning for the most effective usage of memory and hardware memory management assists for the lowest overhead With vSphere ( in ESX 4.0), we introduce several new optimizations that supplement existing mechanisms for the highest output ESX scales now to support 64 cores and 512GB of physical RAM (double our previous limits)– so you can virtualize very large scaled up servers and run them with the most efficiency Virtual machines themselves can now scale to be very large – upto 8 way vSMP and 255 GB of RAM (up from 4 way and 64GB) We introduce numerous storage and network optimizations that allow us to process i/o faster and with even lower CPU overhead We also now introduce VMDirect technology that allows a VM direct access to underlying devices – for the workloads that need constant access to the underlying hardware, this enables low CPU overhead by allowing the VM direct access to the device. Note: The numbers that follow are typically not the result of any one thing we did, we basically worked on optimizations throughout the stack for VMware vSphere 4.0. For those not familiar with or interested in performance, this slide can be covered at just a summary level (extensive optimizations in every component of the stack contribute to increased ability to run the most intense and critical applications in vSphere)
  • In terms of absolute numbers, with ESX 3.5, we address the performance requirements of a large section of workloads today. In 2009, we will now have the ability to accommodate some of the largest workloads out there. We’ll support VMs with up to 8 Virtual CPUs (8-way SMP) These VMs can be assigned up to 255GB of RAM We can sustain 40Gb/s of network I/O, and We can push up to 200,000 I/O operations per second! There aren’t a lot of workloads out there today that come close to limits we will handle. Our goal? There should not be a single workload out there which isn’t a great candidate for virtualization. We think we’re pretty close today. In 2009 we hope we’ll have achieved this goal. Peak means peak hours: 7 am – 7 PM
  • The net result of our storage and networking optimizations is visible here Network transmit improvement: The kernel now fully utilizes NetQueue to greatly improve the scaling of multi-way, network-intensive workloads. This data point showcases one of the most challenging network configurations: many virtual machines sending many small packets at one time. This result represents an outlier in performance as most workloads have fewer VMs, larger packets, and much lower throughput. But this data point does show the gains due to networking improvements. iSCSI throughput has increased 10 times over previous..with 10 GigE support
  • Running a resource-intensive OLTP benchmark, based on a fair-use implementation of the TPC-C* workload specification, VMware achieved 85 percent of native performance when running Oracle DB on VMware ESX. This workload, which demonstrated 8,900 database transactions per second and 60,000 disk input/outputs per second (IOPS), is the most resource-intensive load ever shown in a virtual environment to date.
  • Some graphic here to illustrate that with the transaction performance from the previous 2 slides, vSphere can run 5x the entire VISA payment processing traffic in a single VM.
  • This level of i/o and transactions are generated by a single virtual machine that we’ve tried to represent in this picture
  • To generate this level of i/o and transactions per second required a really big piece of hardware just a few years ago.
  • For a real life example of what the effect on application performance is – take a look at the above results for a 4-vCPU SQL workload. Performance approaches native with ESX 4.0 industry standard workload modeling a brokerage house, a 4vCPU VM with 26GB SQL buffer cache ran at 90% of native performance with a 500 GB database performing 10,500 iops and 50Mb/s of network throughput.
  • We already set a world record with 3.5 recently – we hope to beat it with 4.0. Details on world record for web server performance The SPECweb2005 workload benchmark gives web users the most objective and representative benchmark for measuring a system's ability to act as a web server and is used by all major vendors as a basis for comparing platform capabilities and ability to support web traffic. When using the highly network-intensive SPECweb2005 workload to compare performance of VMware Infrastructure 3 to that of a similarly configured native – i.e., unvirtualized – server, the results on VMware’s virtualization platform in some cases exceeded any number recorded on any physical machine. VMware’s aggregate SPECweb2005 performance of 44,000 is higher than any 16-core system has ever recorded. This benchmark was on 3.5 – 4.0 is even better.
  • SPECweb score is produced by applying a geometric mean to the measured number of simultaneous web server connections on three separate workloads.  On one of these, the E-Commerce workload, VMware’s submission supported 69,525 simultaneous connections.  To put this number in perspective, an online retailer might expect no more than 1 percent of its customers to connect to its web servers at one time.  Using the configuration reported by VMware, this online retailer could support nearly seven million customers from a single physical server.  These results further demonstrate the ability of virtualized environments to run applications with performance that is equal to or better than native systems. VMware’s score on this highly relevant E-Commerce workload of SPECweb 2005 represented more simultaneous web connections than has ever been reported on a 16-core system.  With 69,525 connections, it was only improved upon by 75 more connections by a very recent 24-core system.  As the vast majority of web farms in today’s online retailers use dual core, two socket systems, migrating to
  • For a single VM, vSphere can provide amazing levels of performance and throughput. That’s only half the story however, we also have to look at the performance achieved per physical host. There is a major problem today – the application – CPU gap . If we look back in 2005, the largest quad-socket server had a total of 8 processor cores. Many apps were able to scale to that number of cores and hence use the full server capacity. In 2010, quad-socket servers will have up to 64 processor cores. The vast majority of apps can NOT scale to that many cores, and hence in the traditional deployment model of 1 app to 1 server, will only be able to use a fraction of the server’s capacity. Exchange for example will only scale to 8 cores, and even SQL will be limited to 32 cores – leaving the majority of the compute capacity unused. With ESX, these apps can be scaled out to tap the full capacity of these servers. For example, you can use VMware to deploy multiple Exchange mailboxes on one physical host, and increase the total throughput achieved from that host as compared to that traditional single-mailbox deployment model.
  • Now for the other vCompute features. DPM in VMware vSphere™ 4.0 will be supported in production – using a couple of new technologies IPMI and iLO. DPM with WoL will still be supported experimentally only. Right-size Capacity Use fewer servers when demand from virtual machines is low Use more servers when demand high Minimize Power Consumption Power off inactive hosts Bring capacity back online as workload needs increase Power-on via IPMI, iLO Integrated with DRS Works in concert with load balancing Respects QoS policies No disruption or downtime to VMs Most servers consume 50% of their peak power requirement even when idle. Distributed Power Management helps you really manage your power bill without compromising on resource availability to virtual machines Put host in stand-by mode if: total demand + reserve <= total capacity minus host capacity MORE DETAIL FOR INTERESTED CUSTOMERS: Users can define: Reserve capacity to always be available Time for which load history can be monitored before the power off decision is made. Time for which load history can be monitored before the power on decision is made. Power on will also be triggered when there aren’t enough resources available to power-on a VM or when more spare capacity needed for HA. Stand-by mode means the host is powered off (S5). There are sub-modes to standby mode: When a recommendation to go into standby is accepted, the host immediately enters standby/entering mode. In this mode the machine is still powered on and may still have some VMs running on it. They must be migrated off, and no new VMs can be started/migrated on the host. When the host is evacuated, it can be powered off ( standby/off ) At some later point, if a recommendation to leave standby mode is accepted, the machine is powered up and begins to boot ( standby/leaving ).  No VMs can be migrated on it until it's fully up. Automation options: Automation level Automatic – DPM makes power on/off recommendations and executes them Manual – DPM makes power on/off recommendations and admin chooses whether or not to execute them Off – DPM is disabled Automation level defined on per-cluster & per-host basis Advanced options for tuning load parameters Manual power off/on of hosts Requirements and considerations: Running vCenter Server with DRS VMotion compatible cluster Shared storage Compatible processor architectures VMkernel/VMotion network Hosts with Wake on LAN NICs with Wake on LAN Configure these as the VMotion NICs Test Wake on LAN prior to using DPM in production Manually power off and then power on each host using VC UI How will DPM work with the customer’s server monitoring software? Won’t it cause a lot of false alarms?   In many customer environments, monitoring software is set up to trigger a high priority alarm when a server is detected as being unavailable, unresponsive, or “down.” When DPM is introduced into such an environment, it is important to take the necessary steps to ensure that the server shutdowns that DPM performs do not trigger these alarms as well, since they do not signify failure of any kind. In other words, the admin doesn’t want to be woken up in the middle of the night just because DPM powered off a server.   The steps to take depend on the specific monitoring software that is in place. In many cases, what will be needed is a new version of the VMware-specific module of the monitoring software. Vendors are updating these modules to be able to pull DPM-related vCenter events that will be used to identify DPM-initiated server shutdowns and suppress alarms related to those. The customer should contact their monitoring software vendor for information on delivery timeframes.   Please see the vSphere 4 Resource Management Guide & the VMware Distributed Power Management: Concepts and Usage* technical paper for more information on how to properly set up monitoring in a DPM environment.     Won’t frequent power-cycling of server hardware decrease the reliability of the hardware?   A recent report from the University of California at Berkeley argues that as long as the power-cycling is not excessively frequent (excessive ≈ once or more every hour), powering down servers might actually help increase hardware reliability by reducing disk wear and tear and chip failure. [“A Case for Adaptive Datacenters to Conserve Energy and Improve Reliability”, Peter Bodik et al., Technical Report No. UCB/EECS-2008-127, http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/Pubs/TechRpts/2008/EECS-2008-127.html , September 2008].   The DPM algorithm does not frequently power servers up and down in response to transient load variations, but rather takes great pains to power down a server only when it is very likely that it will stay powered down for some time. It does this by taking into a account a long (40-minute) history of the cluster workload. Once a server is powered back on, DPM will ensure that it stays powered on for a non-trivial amount of time before being again considered for power-off. In addition, DPM cycles through all comparable DPM-enabled hosts when trying to find a power-off candidate, thereby minimizing the power cycling frequency across all of the hosts in the cluster.   DPM has also received endorsement from server hardware vendors, who are very enthusiastic about DPM being used on their systems.     How does DPM compare to power-management features inside the server hardware? Won’t those provide the same amount of savings without the hassle & risk of completely powering down the server?   Background: ESX/ESXi 4.0 supports Enhanced Intel SpeedStep® and Enhanced AMD PowerNow! CPU power management technologies. The dynamic voltage and frequency scaling (DVFS) enabled by these hardware features enables power savings on ESX hosts that are not operating at maximum capacity.   DVFS is a very useful feature, but the power savings it provides even on a completely idle host is necessarily much lower than powering the host off completely. DVFS is, therefore, complementary to DPM and we recommend that the two be used together to maximize power savings.   In other words, DPM will achieve a large degree of power savings by powering down some hosts completely, and then DVFS will provide additional savings on the remaining hosts if they are at least somewhat underutilized. And using DVFS means that power can be saved even when load is high enough to keep DPM from powering down any hosts.     Why don’t you support alternatives to complete power down (S5) – something like laptop standby (S1), suspend (S2/S3), and/or hibernate (S4)? Wouldn’t these other low power states provide a faster & more reliable way to exit DPM standby mode?   If implemented, these alternative states could potentially allow DPM to bring a machine back into service somewhat faster, but they have several drawbacks:   a) Restoring from an S1-S4 sleep state is not more reliable than cold booting from S5; in fact, it is probably less reliable due to the need for special-case hardware, firmware, and software support that receives less testing than the cold boot path.   b) Today's server hardware typically does not provide these states, due to the complexity of implementing and verifying the necessary hardware and firmware support. The support that would be needed in VMware software would also be complex to implement, test, and maintain.   c) The S1 and S2/S3 states save less power than S5.   d) S4 is essentially identical to S5 except that in S4, when the system is powered back on, it is expected to restore its state from disk instead of doing a full cold boot. This may or may not be significantly faster.   Is there a way to schedule DPM? I don’t want any servers to be powered down during critical workday hours.   The best approach for turning DPM “off” during critical peak hours is to use the MinPoweredOnCpuCapacity & MinPoweredOnMemCapacity advanced options described in the VMware Distributed Power Management: Concepts and Usage* technical paper. In order to schedule periodic changes to the values of these options, you’ll need to access these options via a script and use an external scheduling tool such as cron.
  • In addition to the reduced power & cooling due to datacenter consolidation, DPM provides addiitonal cost savings on an ongoing basis In this example of a 100 server datacenter, where about 50 servers can be powered off for 8 hrs/ day on weekdays and 16 hrs /day on weekends, DPM provides a 20% reduction in power and cooling costs. Capacity is always available on standby should workload requirements increase, however the resulting power cost is not incurred. This is a very important benefit for datacenters overburdened by power and cooling costs – consolidation provides significant benefit to start with, DPM adds to the benefit by reducing administrative overhead required to manage power well.
  • vStorage Thin Provisioning optimizes storage costs through the most efficient use of storage in virtual environments. Storage requests more often than not are usually overestimated by users mostly to avoid having to go through the request/approval process. With vStorage Thin Provisioning, IT depts can now assure business users of storage space availability while deferring the actual costs of purchasing storage to when it is really needed. Full reporting and alerting on allocation and consumption ensure that virtual machines don’t really run out of storage, Storage VMotion and Volume Grow (next slide) ensure that virtual machines can either migrate to datastores with additional storage or volumes can be increased in size when consumption approaches allocation.
  • vStorage VMFS also has a couple of new features in VMware vSphere 4.0. VMFS volumes can be expanded on the same LUN without disruption. Virtual machine disks can also be extended without disruption or downtime.
  • Also new with vSphere 4 are the vStorage APIs for Data Protection. These APIs are the next generation of VMware Consolidated Backup—they take the benefits of Consolidated Backup, make them significantly easier to deploy, and add several new features that deliver efficient, scalable backup and restore of virtual machines. Like Consolidated Backup, these APIs make it possible to offload backup processing from ESX servers, ensuring that you deliver the best consolidation ratios without disrupting applications and users. These APIs enable backup tools to directly connect the ESX servers and the virtual machines running on them without any additional software installation. They add the ability to enable backup tools to do efficient incremental, differential, and full-image backup and restore of virtual machines. Note: VMware Consolidated Backup 1.5 U1 ships with vSphere 4, however the new features are only available with backup software that leverages these APIs.
  • vNetwork is a collection of networking technologies for optimally integrating networking and I/O functionality into VMware Infrastructure. vNetwork Distributed Switch enables the network to be treated as an aggregated resource… much like what we do with compute and storage already today vDS moves away from single host virtual switch management, and moves management up to the datacenter level. With vDS, no longer will you be configuring virtual switches on every host. Instead, with vDS, you’ll be managing a single global entity, with a single namespace and globally assured configuration, and you’ll be attaching VM’s only to that cluster or datacenter-wide entity. VDS is a new type of virtual switch which spans the entire Virtual Infrastructure…analogous in many ways to a “stacked switch”. Today, when virtual machines migrate from one host to another, Network statistics don’t follow the VM after it migrates Value-added services like inline filtering, failover teaming, etc. may not follow the VM By creating vDS, a single cluster-wide global virtual switch, we lay the foundation for a new generation of properly mobile, networking services. vDS lays a virtual networking foundation for both VMware and partners to build richer, mobility-friendly network services in which policies, rules, value-adds, metrics and statistics become mobile with the VM.
  • Leveraging VMware’s industry-leading technology and experience, VMware vSphere™ 4 delivers uncompromised control, in the most efficient manner, while fully preserving customer choice. This combination, with VMware’s unique approach for bridging internal and external cloud infrastructures, makes VMware vSphere™ 4 the best solution for achieving the full benefits of cloud computing.
  • Application Services are components of the cloud OS that provide built in controls for service levels –these are usable with any application running on any OS inside a virtual machine – and can be turned on or off easily. This is a summary of all the new and existing application services that VMware vSphere™.
  • Today VMware provides a variety of solutions that shield applications from infrastructure downtime. VMotion protects applications from planned server downtime, HA provides the first line of defense against unplanned server downtime. Storage VMotion protects applications against planned storage downtime, while Consolidated backup provides a framework to protect against data corruption or data loss At the interconnect layer, NIC & HBA teaming provide resilience to unplanned component failures At the virtual machine level, VM failure monitoring provides the automated restart in the case of virtual machine failures Beyond individual sets of servers/storage, if the entire set goes down, Site Recovery Manager provides the orchestration of recovery from downtime and can be used for planned site downtime/migration as well.
  • VMware Fault Tolerance is a component of VMware vSphere™ that ensures continuous availability for virtual machines against hardware failures. VMware FT creates virtual machine “pairs” that run in lock step - essentially mirroring the execution state of a VM. To the external world they appear as one instance (one IP address, one application) – but they are fully redundant instances. In the event of an unexpected hardware failure that causes the active, primary VM to fail – a secondary, formerly passive VM immediately picks up where the primary left off, and continues to run, uninterrupted, and without any loss of network connections or transactions. This technology will also work across any application & any OS without modifications, without scripting, and provides a much more cost-effective way of running mission critical workloads than fault-tolerant hardware dedicated entirely to individual applications. At VMware, we say that “virtual is better than physical” very frequently, and our advanced development work on providing continuous availability for VMs – to enable VMs to keep executing, completely uninterrupted by unexpected hardware failures - is one of the great examples of why this is true. We have taken technology implemented with very complex custom hardware and delivered it for commodity x86 hardware. We believe this technology, and all of the other business continuity benefits of virtualization will drive more and more mission critical workloads into virtual machines because they can enable HIGHER levels of availability, at a fraction of the cost & complexity of physical solutions. DETAILS ( use only as needed) Limitations of FT initially: dependent on shared storage, Uniprocessor VMs only. Additional overhead also associated with this type of solution. Overall performance impact still TBD, but you can expect more CPU & memory resources will be required to run the 2 nd VM, and applications may experience small amounts of added latency. In spite of initial limitations, longer term trends are in our favor: FT will take advantage of hardware assisted virtualization in CPUs, more and more CPU cores becoming available to offload overhead, and high-speed network improvements like 10gigE to reduce latencies…
  • Workloads that were protected with automated restart against hardware failures were less than 10% of all workloads because of the cost and complexity of clustering. With HA, we extended automated restarts to ALL workloads in the datacenter , making first level failure protection very very easy and accessible. The workloads that are protected CONTINUOUSLY today against hardware failures are a very small fraction of all workloads, because the cost and complexity of solutions that provide the continuous levels of availability is very high. We expect that with FT, we will have a similar effect where many critical workloads that are only protected by HA or not protected against physical failures at all are able to gain FT protection.
  • Ft, which is included in vSphere advanced, enterprise and enterprise plus editions provides great additional value for customers…saving mission critical applications from very expensive downtime.
  • vCenter Data Recovery is a new tool in for VMware vSphere™ users that provides complete data protection for your virtual machines. Note that it is appropriate for smaller environments (100 VMs or less). - It’s a disk-based solution that’s easy to use and fast to backup and restore. - It’s built on the VCB API and is fully integrated with vCenter management to enable centralized and efficient scheduling of backup jobs using an intuitive workflow. Step 1: Backing up your virtual machines is a snap – - First you schedule your backups directly through the vCenter interface. <FIRST BUILD CLICK> - Snapshots are taken at your scheduled intervals and written to near-line storage (local or shared). - After the first full VM backup, subsequent backups are incremental to save time and disk space. - vCenter Data Recovery also uses disk de-duplication to further reduce the disk space required for backup storage. <SECOND BUILD CLICK> Step 2: The toughest part of the backup process is recovering your apps and data. vCenter Data Recovery makes this process quick and easy – - When a VM goes down, you go to vCenter and quickly access the directory of backup VMs and files. <THIRD BUILD CLICK> - Select which ones you want to recover (individual files or complete VM) and restore in seconds/minutes - Your applications and data are back up and running!
  • VMware VMSafe announced earlier in 2008, is a set of APIs that enable protection of VMs by a protection engine that : Works with the hypervisor to inspect a VM’s mem, cpu and storage from a higher privilege point Is isolated from the malware Covers all aspects of security – not limited to network or host. VMware VMSafe based products from our security partner ecosystem will work with VMware vSphere™ editions to provide higher levels of security than even physical systems Partners who are working on VMSafe products: Symantec, trend micro, checkpoint, Internet security systems prototyped products at Vmworld 2008, McAfee also working on a product. MORE DETAIL Security solutions have an inherent problem. Protection engines are running in the same context as the malware they are protecting against and as a result, malware is able to subvert these engines by simply using the same hooks into the system as the protection engine. Worse, with Longhorn and Vista, Microsoft has enabled Patchguard, effectively eliminating the kernel hooks available to both the security solutions and the malware. While this helps, it doesn’t change the fact that malware and rootkits still exist and can run in those environments. The context that these security solutions need to protect against is also not limited to one set of interactions (e.g. attacks from the network and from spyware and from rootkits). Even those solutions that are in a safe context (outside the OS), they can’t see information from other contexts (e.g. network protection has no host visibility). Security API’s built into the hypervisor allow for 2 key advantages: Better Context – Provide protection from outside the OS, from a trusted context New Capabilities – now they can view all interactions and contexts Now, new security solutions can be developed and integrated within the VMware virtual infrastructure and we can protect the VM by inspection of virtual components (CPU, Memory, Network and Storage). Provides complete integration with VMotion, Storage VMotion, HA, etc. for any new security solution using the API’s. The end-result is an unprecedented level of security for VMs that’s better than the physical infrastructure. These API’s are already being made available to the security ISVs ecosystem. We utilize VC for role-based privileges to assign protection to any single VM and VMware certifies the solutions developed by our partners to ensure the security VM is created by a real security ISV and not a malicious hacker. Some potential use cases: An AV virtual appliance that intercepts all storage IO and is able to scan files as they are read/written from disk. This can be done without loading an AV agent on each machine. Inline Network Security for each ESX host. Now you can ensure that ALL network IO traffic is inspected by an inline appliance, regardless of your virtual networking setup. This includes even inter-VM traffic and allows state to be transferred from host to host during VMotion so that the security protection is never lost.
  • VMware vShield Zones, a new security service for VMware’s Cloud OS, vSphere, ensures strict compliance with security policies and industry regulations for user data as customers adopt cloud computing with virtual environments for increased efficiency and flexibility. Previously, compliance required diverting network traffic to external physical appliances resulting in disconnected ‘islands’ of infrastructure. With VMware vShield Zones, customers can now create logical zones in the virtual datacenter that span all of the shared physical resources, and each zone represents a distinct level of trust and confidentiality. This allows businesses to comply with corporate security policies and regulations on data privacy while still running applications efficiently on shared computing resource pools.   ( this comes to VMware from our blue lane acquisition) Traditional security products, such as firewall appliances, require that all network activity pass through a handful of fixed physical locations in order to be monitored.   Virtualized applications, in contrast can be migrated between physical hosts for higher resource efficiency and improved uptime. Therefore, companies virtualizing security sensitive applications faced the choice of either leveraging virtualization capabilities such as live migration for optimal load balancing and availability, or enforcing strict security compliance. To solve that dilemma, most customers ended up dividing their virtual environments into smaller, less efficient clusters for areas such as their Internet-facing demilitarized zones (DMZ’s) or consumer credit data processing systems subject to Payment Card Industry regulations. VMware vShield Zones enables customers to create security zones within enterprises or in multi-tenant cloud infrastructures, where security policies are enforced even as virtual machines dynamically migrate between hardware devices. Deployed as a virtual appliance and integrated into vCenter Server, vShield Zones makes it easy to centrally manage and enforce compliance with security policies across large pools of servers and virtual machines. Built-in auditing capabilities make compliance straightforward and verifiable.   Example : today you send network traffic to an external Network IDS/IPS box which becomes a chokepoint.  With this feature all that traffic can be handled internal to the virtual infrastructure.  Similarly, there is also the capability for packet/protocol monitoring to be on the alert for SQL insertion or other data oriented attacks.  By combining multiple layers of the security “onion” within the virtual infrastructure you can more easily pass security and compliance audits will eliminating much of the costs associated with these activities
  • Think of the physical world today – where scaling an app means a complex task involving detailed sizing, procuring hardware, application downtime, then moving the application over to new hardware etc. Virtualization already made this process easier with hardware independent movement of apps – but with hot add, now applications can be provisioned in a “future proof” manner. As apps grow, as they get more and more intense over time and need more compute, memory or network/storage resources, admins can now scale them up dynamically – no disruption, no complex porting , on the fly.
  • Think of the physical world today – where scaling an app means a complex task involving detailed sizing, procuring hardware, application downtime, then moving the application over to new hardware etc. Virtualization already made this process easier with hardware independent movement of apps – but with hot add, now applications can be provisioned in a “future proof” manner. As apps grow, as they get more and more intense over time and need more compute, memory or network/storage resources, admins can now scale them up dynamically – no disruption, no complex porting , on the fly.
  • Many applications are difficult to size – databases being a good example. Admins have to forecast capacity requirements for coming 3 years, then translate that estimate into system specs (CPU, memory). If they guess wrong, then the app has to be reprovisioned. This is a cause of downtime and major disruption to the application. With hot add, now applications can be provisioned in a “future proof” manner. As apps grow, as they get more and more intense over time and need more compute, memory or network/storage resources, admins can now scale them up dynamically and on the fly – without disrupting the app, and without requiring complex re-provisioning. In this example, the transaction rate (TPS) goes up, and as a result latency increases beyond the SLA limits. The VI Admin can hot-add capacity to the VM, and SQL 2008 automatically detects this new capacity. In a matter of minutes – without downtime – SQL stabilizes with new capacity, and the latency goes back down to within SLA requirements.
  • In addition to built in controls, next generation management services provided by VMware vCenter suite provides enhanced control of vSphere environments.
  • vApp is the construct that allows for existing or new applications to be packaged up into self describing entities – that can move from location to location ; and yet have the same service levels delivered. The OVF descriptor acts as a bar code allowing the requirements of the application to be specified by the administrator and interpreted and automatically delivered by the infrastructure. <vApps can consist of one or more virtual machines> For example, a typical application now consists of a web, application and database tier and all these tiers must be managed as one for logical consistency and to protect the application flow.  vApps allow you to create a container for these components such that you can clone, snapshot and manage them as an entity vs. their individual components. vApp becomes the unit of control for applications in vSphere environments vApps simplify the deployment and ongoing management of an n-tier application in multiple virtual machines by encapsulating it into a single virtual service entity. vApps encapsulate not only virtual machines but also their interdependencies and resource allocations allowing for single-step power operations, cloning, deployment, and monitoring of the entire application. VMware vSphere™ now includes support for creating and running vApps as well as importing and exporting them in compliance with Open Virtualization Format (OVF) 1.0 standard. Initially with vSphere – a vApp can describe network configurations of virtual machines and DRS CPU and memory requirements for virtual machines irtual netwVorks can be configured with a range of IP addresses When a VM starts up inside a vApp, it is assigned an IP address All other VMs in the vApp also get notified of the new VMs IP address
  • Note : This slide occurs twice in the presentation – once in the “control” section and once in the “ choice” section. Controls provided at the virtual machine ,application as well as host level are integrated with today’s enterprise systems management frameworks to enable end to end seamless physical and virtual management. This slide defines the VMware position on physical infrastructure management – we believe that instead of having to rip and replace existing ESM frameworks, customers would be better served by our close integration with partners that provide physical infrastructure management
  • VMware vCenter Server provides greater operational control of vSphere environments through automation and deep visibility into every level of virtual infrastructure. It scales to manage large environments and integrates with industry-leading systems management solutions for enterprise-wide system management.
  • VMware vCenter Orchestrator is an automation orchestration tool that enables you to put together, via an easy drag & drop interface, automated workflows of tasks and processes specific to your needs and environment. All the ~800 operations in vSphere environments are represented as workflow elements and through simple drag & drop you can create automated workflows and orchestration of execution sequence across many different elements. For example, one advanced VMO user created a workflow that enabled datacenter migration in the click of one button. This was a workflow that performed a number of VC operations on each VM in a cluster, including a VMotion, until the entire set of VMs had been migrated to a cluster in another datacenter. vCenter Orchestrator will ship with at least 3 canned workflows (10-15 more are in the pipeline): Workflow to snapshot all VMs in a DRS cluster – which is typically executed prior to patching VMs Workflow to rescan the HBAs on all hosts when a LUN is added Send email to admin when a VM is powered on
  • vCenter host profiles simplify and standardize ESX host configuration. This feature in vCenter Server 4.0 allows the creation of a “golden profile” from an existing host and using this as a template to configure other hosts Host profiles can be associated with other hosts/clusters and compliance to these profiles can be monitored and enforced automatically This is a powerful capability – especially when used in conjunction with the vNetwork Distributed Switch, reducing considerably the time spent in making sure of ESX host configurations In large scale environments, when ESX hosts are being added every day or every hour, standardizing the storage, network and security configurations of these hosts becomes really important. Managing change can also be complex especially when the same change needs to be applied to many hosts (example – array goes through firmware upgrade, and multipathing settings need to be changed across all hosts in a cluster) The Host Profiles feature allows you to export configuration settings from a gold reference host and save them as a portable set of policies, called a host profile. You can then use this profile to quickly configure other hosts in the datacenter. Configuring hosts using this method drastically reduces the setup time of new hosts: 10’s of steps reduced to a single click. Host profiles also eliminate the need for specialized scripts to configure hosts. Additionally, vCenter uses the profile as a configuration baseline, so you can monitor for changes to the configuration, detect discrepancies and fix them. Host profiles eliminate per-host, manual, or UI-based host configuration and efficiently maintain configuration consistency and correctness across the entire datacenter.
  • vCenter Server Linked Mode – allows vCenter Servers in a multi-datacenter environment to join a group, allowing the sharing of roles and permissions. A single vSphere client (formerly VI Client) can be used to log into many VCs – and inventory across many VCs can be managed from this single pane of glass. This improves the scalability of vCenter Server. vCenter Server 4 introduces the ability to join multiple vCenter Servers into a linked‐mode group. Then you can use the vSphere Client to log on to any single instance of vCenter Server and view and manage the inventories of all the vCenter Servers in the group. Each user sees only the vCenter Server instances for which they have valid permissions. There are several reasons why you may want to link vCenter Servers. For example, you may want to simplify management of inventories associated with remote offices or multiple datacenters. Likewise, you could use Linked Mode to configure a recovery site for disaster recovery purposes. vCenter Server Linked Mode allows for: Global role definitions Searches for inventory items across multiple vCenter Server instances And a license model across multiple vCenter Servers Linked Mode uses Microsoft Active Directory Application Mode (or ADAM <Adam>) to store and synchronize data across multiple vCenter Server instances. ADAM is an implementation of Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (or LDAP <el dap>). ADAM is installed automatically as part of the vCenter Server installation. Each ADAM instance stores data from all vCenter Servers in the group. Using peer‐to‐peer networking, the ADAM instances in a group replicate shared global data to the LDAP directory. The global data for each vCenter Server instance includes: Connection information (that is, IP addresses and ports) Certificates and thumbprints Licensing information And user roles All vCenter Server instances in a linked‐mode group can access a common view of the global data. The vSphere Client can connect to other vCenter Servers using the connection information retrieved from ADAM.
  • New licensing consists of two new customer-facing interfaces: vCenter license reports and administration License portal Key theme: simplification! Better match between how we sell and how we license Compliance: easy to overdeploy, but also easier to detect overdeployment Flex licensing is replaced by simple license keys Each vSphere host is assigned only 1 single license key for the entire “bundle” (e.g., Enterprise) rather than a separate license for each feature Same license key can be shared by many vSphere hosts, subject to the key’s maximum CPU count New centralized license key administration in vCenter No separate license server to manage or monitor – license administration is a native vCenter feature vCenter can be used to assign license keys to vSphere hosts via a simple UI Centralized vCenter report on all hosts and license keys in inventory enables easy monitoring of license state and compliance New license portal provides more accurate view of entitlement License keys linked to purchase history, including upgrades and license recombinations (i.e., division/combination of license quantities into more/fewer keys) Contract administration self-service allows addition and removal of license admins and support admins with access to specific licenses
  • Activation process is a key driver of customer experience (and of support calls) VI3 on left, VI4 on right Fewer steps = fewer error opportunities Portal is no longer a performance bottleneck No separate piece of software to manage (license server) – everything is in vCenter itself
  • Leveraging VMware’s industry-leading technology and experience, VMware vSphere™ 4 delivers uncompromised control, in the most efficient manner, while fully preserving customer choice. This combination, with VMware’s unique approach for bridging internal and external cloud infrastructures, makes VMware vSphere™ 4 the best solution for achieving the full benefits of cloud computing.
  • VMware vCenter Server provides greater operational control of vSphere environments through automation and deep visibility into every level of virtual infrastructure. It scales to manage large environments and integrates with industry-leading systems management solutions for enterprise-wide system management. vApps simplify the deployment and ongoing management of an n-tier application in multiple virtual machines by encapsulating it into a single virtual service entity. vApps encapsulate not only virtual machines but also their interdependencies and resource allocations allowing for single-step power operations, cloning, deployment, and monitoring of the entire application. VMware vSphere™ now includes support for creating and running vApps as well as importing and exporting them in compliance with Open Virtualization Format (OVF) 1.0 standard. vApp is the construct that allows for exisitng or new applications to be packaged up into self describing entities – that can move from location to location ; and yet have the same service levels delivered. The OVF descriptor acts as a bar code allowing the requirements of the application to be specified by the administrator and interpreted and automatically delivered by the infrastructure. <vApps can consist of one or more virtual machines> This is what essentially enables choice – run your app wherever, but be assured of service levels regardless.. Initially with vSphere – a vApp can describe network configurations of virtual machines and DRS CPU and memory requirements for virtual machines irtual netwVorks can be configured with a range of IP addresses When a VM starts up inside a vApp, it is assigned an IP address All other VMs in the vApp also get notified of the new VMs IP address
  • [begin] On the guest operating system support side, VMware vSphere supports far more guest operating systems than any other bare-metal virtualization platform. VMware ESX’s superior performance with unmodified, or fully virtualized, guests is made possible by our exclusive binary translation technology. This means that ESX can run off-the-shelf operating systems at near-native performance. Other hypervisors suffer serious performance degradation with unmodified guests and require non-standard guest modifications like paravirtualization (Xen) or “Enlightenments” (Hyper-V) in order to deliver acceptable performance. Visit vmware.com to see a comparison table of VMware ESX’s guest operating system support versus Microsoft Hyper-V and Citrix XenServer 4. You’ll see that VMware ESX supports nearly three times more operating systems than Hyper-V and over 65% more than Citrix XenServer. Full list below Asianux3 CentOS 5 CentOS 4.5 and newer Debian 5 Debian 4 ... Technically this starts with r3, but that might be too much detail. FreeBSD 7.0 and newer or FreeBSD 7 FreeBSD 6.3 and newer MS DOS 6.22 Netware 6.5 ... Technically starting at SP6 Netware 6.0 ... Technically starting at SP5 Netware 5.1 ... Technically starting at SP7 Open Enterprise Server 2 OS/2 4.0 and 4.5.2 RHEL5 RHEL4 RHEL3 RHEL2.1 ... Technically starting at U7 SCO Openserver 5 ... Technically this is 5.0.6 and 5.0.7 only SCO Unixware 7.1 ... Technically this is 7.1.1 and 7.1.4 only Solaris 10 for x86 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server/Desktop 11 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server/Desktop 10 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 ... Starting at SP3 Windows Server 2008 R2 (experimental) ... Not sure we need to list this. Windows7 (experimental) ... Not sure you need to list this. Windows PE 2.0 and 2.1 Windows Server 2008 Windows Vista Windows Server 2003 R2 ... Not sure we need to list this in addition to below Windows Server 2003 ... Many variants here. Probably not worth listing. Windows XP ... Technically this is Professional Edition only and not Home Edition, also starts with SP1 Windows XPe ... Not sure we need to list this, also technically starts with SP2 Windows 2000 ... Technically this is only Pro, Server and Advanced Server; but not Data Center Windows NT 4.0 ... Technically this starts with SP6a … Also is Workstation and Server only and not Terminal Server and Enterprise Edition … also limited to UP Windows 98 Windows 95 Windows 3.1 Ubuntu 7.04 and newer   Existing from slide was: Windows NT 4.0 Windows 2000 Windows Server 2003 Windows Server 2008 (experimental) Windows Vista Windows XP RHEL5 RHEL4 RHEL3 RHEL2.1 SLES10 SLES9 SLES8 Ubuntu 7.04 Solaris 10 for x86 NetWare 6.5 NetWare 6.0 NetWare 6.1
  • [begin] Let’s start with software support. Independent analysts like Burton Group have concluded that VMware ESX has the broadest support for both guest operating systems and applications. On the applications side, more and more ISVs now test their upcoming software on VMware before releasing them to market. For existing applications, more and more ISVs go back and re-certify on VMware. As an example, VMware ESX was the first x86 virtualization platform for SAP to announce full support for its solutions in 64-bit Windows- and Linux-based production environments. That’s a testament to the stability SAP saw in VMware ESX. Visit vmware.com to see a comprehensive list of the software vendors with support statements for VMware products. It includes marquee software developerslike: Adobe, BMC Software, HP, IBM, McAfee, Microsoft, SAP, Sybase, and Symantec to name a few. [next slide]
  • Utilize these choices to deliver the app that is right for the business without being locked in to a particular architecture, inhouse vs external location With VMware vSphere™ 4, customers retain flexibility of choice, remaining independent of hardware, operating system, application stack, and service providers. This means customers can support their existing applications, and feel confident about future applications, while retaining the flexibility to deploy within internal or external clouds.
  • VMware enables service providers to provide valua added and differentiated external clouds that enterprise IT can choose to use.
  • Also retain the choice of end –to-end management solutions . While vCenter Suite of management solutions comprehensively manages virtual environments, it also plugs in seamlessly into broader enterprise frameworks allowing for a choice of management tools for non x86 and x86 environments
  • This is the summary of what’s new with VMware vSphere.
  • This is the summary diagram of vSphere and its components
  • vSphere can get higher CapEx savings (Efficiency) because of VMware’s technology investments into high performance and high scalability. This impacts VM density and consolidation ratios. Higher consolidation ratios lead to needing less hardware, software, and infrastructure to run the customer’s required set of business apps. vSphere can get higher OpEx savings (Efficiency) because no one else has the breadth and depth of infrastructure services, application services, and management solutions that help IT do more with less. VMware’s virtual datacenter services and management solutions deliver automation and quality of service while giving IT control. vSphere delivers greater Control because it has capabilities, that many other offerings don’t have, that help IT guarantee quality of service with uncompromised control. Our R&D investments into capabilities like DRS, DPM, FT, chargeback, AppSpeed, VMsafe, host profiles, Storage vMotion are examples of how we deliver on “Control.” vSphere delivers greater Choice because of the extensive work that VMware has done with ISVs, IHVs, OEMs, and SPs. Also, VMware’s strategy is to remain neutral and support as broad an ecosystem as possible to maximize customer choice, without a bias towards any particular guest OS or application stack. This protects customers existing investments and maximize choice for the future.
  • VMware vSphere is very cost-effective because it has been designed and optimize to run many concurrent VMs while maintaining high performance levels. The unique features and architectural design of VMware vSphere 4 allow you to run more applications per server than commodity virtualization offerings from other vendors. Case studies of our customer deployments show that VMware users commonly achieve 50-70% higher VM density per host than is possible with commodity offerings, resulting in a 20-30% lower cost per-application. Don’t be misled by other virtualization vendors marketing that they are “free” or “less expensive than VMware”. Their license price comparisons are over-simplified, and misleading. Use the VMware Cost-Per-Application Calculator to compare the complete upfront deployment costs of virtualizing your applications on VMware. You’ll see that VMware’s advanced technology actually makes us cheaper. VMware solutions are not only the most proven, robust, and reliable - they also provide the greatest value!
  • Transcript

    • 1. VMware vSphere™ 4.0 The best platform for building cloud infrastructures
    • 2. The Problem
      • Overwhelming complexity
      • >70% of IT budgets just to keep the lights on
      • <30% of IT budgets goes to innovation and competitive advantage
      Where the IT Budget Goes 42% Infrastructure Maintenance 30% Application Maintenance 23% Application Investment 5% Infrastructure Investment Your Business Can Change Only as Fast as Your IT Can
    • 3. The Goal IT as a Service (Internally or Externally Provisioned) Efficiency Control Choice
    • 4. The Path to IT as a Service DATACENTER TODAY Efficient • Reliable • Flexible • Secure • Dynamic 11 Replaced slide, notes remain the same Cloud Computing Efficient Flexible Dynamic Trusted Reliable Secure External Cloud Internal Cloud Private Cloud App Loads Federation & Choice Standards
    • 5. The Private Cloud Brings… The Efficiency of Cloud Computing… … Without the Risk Or Disruption
        • Compatible with any existing or future application
        • Security enforced on- and off-premise
        • Leverage and evolve existing skills, management
        • Future proof – no lock in to specific architectures
        • Business
        • Fast response times
        • Contractual and auditable SLAs
        • Usage based, pay-as-you-go financial model
        • IT
        • Economies of scale
        • High performance, highly available
        • Policy-driven automation
      Changed text on slide
    • 6. The Cloud… as Architecture New Apps Existing and multiple future app models Existing Apps Virtualization is the key to making all of this happen in an evolutionary way Changed the cloud OS box Datacenter/ Cloud Hardware Industry Standard building blocks Software Scale and availability through software Policies Security, Compliance… Management SLA management model Cloud OS
    • 7. Cloud OS - The Underpinning For Cloud Infrastructures Private Cloud Internal Clouds Cloud OS Management Federation & Choice Standards External Clouds Cloud OS Management Changed script App Loads
    • 8. VMware Leads the Way to the Private Cloud 1999
        • The Client Hypervisor
      2000
        • The Server Hypervisor
      2003
        • Virtual Infrastructure
      2009+
        • The Cloud OS
        • VMware vSphere™ Foundation for Internal and External Clouds
    • 9. Introducing… The best platform for building cloud infrastructures
    • 10. VMware vSphere™ – The Industry’s First Cloud Operating System Application Services Infrastructure Services Scalability vSphere 4.0 Security Availability vNetwork vStorage vCompute
        • Dynamic Resource Sizing
        • Network Management
        • Firewall
        • Anti-virus
        • Intrusion Prevention
        • Intrusion Detection
        • Clustering
        • Data Protection
        • Storage Management & Replication
        • Storage Virtual Appliances
        • Hardware Assist
        • Enhanced Live Migration Compatibility
    • 11. VMware vSphere™ 4.0 Delivers Cut capital and operational costs by over 50%. for all applications.. … while automating quality of service… … and remaining independent of hardware, operating system, application stack, and service providers Efficiency Control Choice
    • 12. IT Leaders Can Say “Yes!”
      • We can deliver new business services…
      Business Loss Due to Datacenter Outage Infrastructure Cost Per App Days to Provision a New App On time 56 $14,235 $5,694 2 Within Budget $30 MM $4 MM With Assured QoS Before After Before After Before After * The above data comes from specific VMware customer case studies Changed script
    • 13. On the Internal or External Cloud External Cloud Internal Cloud Unlock new market based economies of scale, service and innovation beyond what currently exists today APP APP Internal Cloud Cloud OS Management External Clouds Cloud OS Management
    • 14. VMware vSphere™ 4.0 Delivers Cut capital and operational costs by over 50% for all applications... … while automating quality of service… … and remaining independent of hardware, operating system, application stack, and service providers Efficiency Control Choice
    • 15. Infrastructure Services Deliver CapEx and OpEx Savings vNetwork
        • Network Management
      vStorage
        • Hardware assist
        • Extended Live Migration Compatibility
      vCompute
      • Storage/network optimizations
      • Power Management
      • CPU/Memory optimization
      • DRS
      • vStorage Thin Provisioning
      • Volume Grow
      • vStorage VMFS
      • vNetwork Distributed Switch
      • Third party distributed virtual switches
      • vNetwork Standard Switch
      CURRENT NEW
        • Storage Management & Replication
        • Storage Virtual Appliances
      VMDirectPath i/o Highest consolidation ratios in the industry Most efficient use of hardware resources Low operational overhead
    • 16. “ Speeds and Feeds” Optimization for the Highest Consolidation Ratios Storage Networking Virtual Machines CPU Memory
      • Virtual hardware scale out
      Current NEW ESX Added to script OS APP OS APP
      • 64 cores and 1TB of physical RAM
      • Hardware Scale Up
      • Lowest CPU overhead
      • Hardware Assist
      • Purpose Built Scheduler
      • Maximum memory efficiency
      • Hardware Assist
      • Page Sharing
      • Ballooning
      • Wirespeed network access
      • VMXNET3
      • VMDirectPath I/O
      • Greater than 200k iops per second Lower than 20 microsecond latency
      • Storage stack optimization
      • VMDirectPath I/O
      • 8-way vSMP and 255 GB of RAM per VM
      • VM Scale Up
      vCompute vStorage vNetwork OS APP OS APP OS APP
    • 17. vSphere 4 Delivers Performance for Demanding Applications % of Applications Application Performance Requirements 95% of applications < 100 at peak < 2.4Mbits/s < 4 GB at peak 1 to 2 CPUs 1. Source: VMware Capacity Planner assessments Numbers changed ESX 3.5 100,000 9 Gb/s 64 GB per VM 4 VCPUs ESX 4.0 200,000+ 20 Gb/s + 255 GB per VM 8 VCPUs
    • 18. I/O Throughput Optimizations for Business Critical Applications iSCSI Maximums .9 9.1 ESX 3.5 ESX 4.0 1VM 23% 86% Network Transmit Potential Gains 4VM 8VM 16VM 14% 59% iSCSI Max Gbps Performance increase in ESX 4.0 over ESX 3.5
    • 19. Single VM Performance: Well-Known Database OLTP Workload † Transaction Rate (Ratio to 1-way VM) Next Generation Intel ® Xeon ® based 8-pCPU server RHEL 5.1 Oracle 11gR1 In-house ESX Server
        • † A fair-use implementation of the TPC-C workload; results are not TPC-C compliant
        • < 15% overhead for 8 vCPU VM
        • 8,900 total DB transactions per second
        • Near-perfect scalability from 1 to 8 vCPUs
        • 60,000 I/O operations/second
    • 20. Comparison to VISA 21 5x Global payment processing traffic
    • 21.  
    • 22. Sun Fire 15k (ca. 2002) ;) =
    • 23. ESX 4.0 Performance with SQL Server 2008
      • ESX achieves 90% of native performance on 4.0 vCPU VM
      • Workload transaction latency unchanged between ESX 4.0 and Native
      Relative Scaling Ratio 51.08 1 vCPU 2 vCPU 4 vCPU 45.22 94.04 79.88 147.24 133.12 VM Native
    • 24. Multi-core + VMware = Record Performance OS APP Operating System Application VMware OS APP OS APP
    • 25. Multi-core + VMware = Record Performance
      • Would serve 3 billion page views per day
      • “ On a typical day, there are 1 billion page views.”
      • Pierre Omidyar, eBay Founder
      • techtarget.com (July 07)
      Support 69,525 44,000 SPECweb2005 Scores eCommerce Banking Aggregate 33,000 80,000 Tester Name System Name Cores Results Fujitsu Siemens PRIMERGY RX600 SF, Intel Xeon processor X7350 16 42783 Hewlett-Packard HP ProLiant DL580 G5 16 30261 Hewlett-Packard HP ProLiant DL580 G5 16 26119 Hewlett-Packard HP ProLiant DL580 G5 16 40046 Hewlett-Packard HP ProLiant DL585 G5 16 43854 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Sun Fire X4450 16 39793 VMware Inc., USA HP ProLiant DL585 G5 (with VMware ESX Server 3.5) 16 44000 VMware Inc., USA HP ProLiant DL585 G5 (with VMware ESX Server 3.5) 16 44,000
        • High score to date on 16 core system
        • 16Gbits/sec web traffic (Support)
        • 143,000 HTTP ops/sec (Banking)
    • 26. Multi-Core + VMware = Record Performance 3x eBay’s daily web traffic on a single server 22
    • 27. Scale Out with vSphere to Exceed Physical Performance Max scalability (# cores) 2005 8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 2010 Average App Exchange Web Servers SQL Server ESX Scale-out Average App Exchange Web Servers SQL Server ESX Scale-out Quad-Socket Dual-Core Quad-Socket 16-Core How many cores can your app scale to on a quad-socket x86? Added new slide
    • 28. Green IT with VMware vSphere™ Power Optimization features
        • DPM consolidates workloads onto fewer servers when the cluster needs fewer resources
          • Places unneeded servers in standby mode
          • Brings servers back online as workload needs increase
        • ESX supports Intel Speed Step/AMD Power now for individual host power optimization
        • Minimizes power consumption while guaranteeing service levels
        • No disruption or downtime to virtual machines
      VMware vSphere™ DPM powers off server when requirements are lower DPM brings servers back online when load increases Changed script and slide OS APP OS APP OS APP vCompute vStorage vNetwork OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP
    • 29. Additional 20% Reduction in Power Costs with DPM… DPM Savings calculated for a datacenter with 100 physical servers 16,800 Hours per Week Before DPM 13,200 $80,300 $63,093 Dollars per Year After DPM Assumptions: 50 out of 100 servers can be powered down for 8 hrs/day on weekdays and 16 hrs/day on weekends. Total power consumption per server ( operating power + cooling power) = 1130.625 watts/hr Cost of energy = $ 0.0813 per kWH (source: Energy Information Administration)
    • 30. vStorage Thin Provisioning
        • Virtual machine disks consume only the amount of physical space in use
          • Virtual machine sees full logical disk size at all times
          • Full reporting and alerting on allocation and consumption
        • Significantly improve storage utilization
        • Eliminate need to over-provision virtual disks
        • Reduce storage costs by up to 50%
      ESX Datastore Virtual Disks 20GB 40GB 20GB 20GB 20GB 100GB Thick Thin Thin 40GB 100GB vCompute vStorage vNetwork OS APP OS APP OS APP 60GB
    • 31. Efficient Storage Abstraction with VMFS
        • Hot Virtual Disk Extend
        • Expand virtual disks online
        • Respond quickly to growing requirements without downtime
        • VMFS Volume Grow
        • Expand VMFS Volume on the same LUN it was created
        • Facilitate adding more virtual machines to an existing volume
        • Facilitate data growth for the virtual machines
        • Increase flexibility to simplify capacity planning
      ESX Datastore Virtual Disks 20GB 100GB LUN Extend 10G of virtual disk Add new virtual disk VMFS Volume Grow to grow the datastore Extend 8G of virtual disk 20GB No change to datastore VMFS Volume Grow to grow the datastore 40GB vCompute vStorage vNetwork OS APP OS APP OS APP
    • 32. vStorage APIs for Data Protection
        • Next generation evolution of VMware Consolidated Backup
          • Centralized off-host backup of virtual machines
          • No additional software on backup server
        • Enables incremental, differential, and full-image backup and restore of virtual machines
        • File-level backup support for Windows and Linux virtual machines
        • Delivers efficient backup without loading ESX servers
      * Note: vSphere 4.0 includes and supports VCB 1.5 U1. New features are only available with products supporting vStorage APIs for Data Protection Moved slide vCompute vStorage vNetwork
    • 33. vNetwork Distributed Switch
        • Aggregated datacenter level virtual networking
        • Simplified setup and change
        • Easy troubleshooting, monitoring and debugging
        • Enables transparent third party management of virtual environments
      VMware vSphere™ vNetwork Distributed Switch vSwitch vSwitch vSwitch Cisco Nexus 1000V 2009 vCompute vStorage vNetwork OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP
    • 34. VMware vSphere™ 4.0 Delivers Cut capital and operational costs by over 50% for all applications... … while automating quality of service… … and remaining independent of hardware, operating system, application stack, and service providers Efficiency Control Choice
    • 35. Application Services Provide Built in Service Level Controls Scalability
        • Dynamic Resource Sizing
      Security
        • Clustering
        • Data Protection
      Availability
      • VMware Fault Tolerance
      • VMware Data Recovery
      • HA, VMotion, Storage VMotion, NIC/HBA teaming provide resiliency to downtime
      • VMware VMsafe
      • VMware vShield Zones
      • ESXi locked down interfaces, no general purpose OS dependence
      • Hot add of virtual CPU, memory
      • Hot plug devices
      • Hot extend or virtual disks
      • 8-way SMP and 255 GB of virtual machine RAM
      • DRS shares and reservations allow apps to shrink and grow based on priority
      CURRENT NEW
        • Firewall
        • Anti-virus
        • Intrusion Detection
        • Intrusion Prevention
    • 36. VMware Solutions Maximize Uptime Planned Downtime Unplanned Downtime Network Redundancy Storage vMotion VMotion NIC & HBA Teaming VCB HA VM Failure Monitoring Site Recovery Manager Availability Security Scalability Server ESX Virtual Machines OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP Interconnect Storage
    • 37. VMware Fault Tolerance
        • Single identical VMs running in lockstep on separate hosts
        • Zero downtime, zero data loss failover for all virtual machines in case of hardware failures
        • Zero downtime, zero data loss
        • No complex clustering or specialized hardware required
        • Single common mechanism for all applications and OS-es
      VMware vSphere™ Availability Security Scalability OS APP OS APP OS APP
    • 38. Transforming Availability Service Levels Hardware Failure Tolerance Application Coverage Unprotected Automated Restart Continuous 0% 10% 100% with VMware HA VMware FT
    • 39. OpEx Savings from VMware FT
        • VMware Fault Tolerance (FT) prevents revenue loss from mission-critical, high-revenue generating applications outages
        • Simplicity of configuration and reduced time & effort compared to hardware-based solutions is not captured
      Value of Lost Revenue 4 $7000/Min 15÷10 2 For a 10 physical server, 150 VM environment, assume ~10% of VMs are protected by FT (15 VMs). 2 host failures in the cluster per year. Lost revenue per minute of high-revenue apps can range from $2000-15000 per minute depending on type of transactions being processed. Minutes of downtime prevented Lost revenue per minute Avg. number of FT-protected VMs per host X X X = $ 69,000 Failures per year in 10-host cluster - Extra Hosts for FT 15000 1 Cost Per Host X Number of extra hosts
    • 40. VMware Data Recovery Copyright © 2005 VMware, Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright © 2005 VMware, Inc. All rights reserved.
        • Agent-less, disk-based backup and recovery of your VMs
        • VM or file level restore
        • Incremental backups and data de-dupe to save disk space
        • Quick, simple and complete data protection for your VMs
        • Centralized Management through VirtualCenter
        • Cost Effective Storage Management
      De-duplicated Storage ESX OS APP Availability Security Scalability OS APP OS APP
    • 41. VMware VMsafe
        • API that enables protection of VMs by inspection of virtual components in conjunction with hypervisor
        • Isolation of protection engine from malware
        • Broad ranging coverage of virtual machine CPU, memory, storage and network
      Protection Engine VMware vSphere™ Application Operating System Changed script Availability Security Scalability
    • 42. VMware vShield Zones
        • Self-learning, self-configuring firewall Service
        • VMotion and network-configuration aware trust zones
        • Dynamic firewall policy using application protocol awareness
        • Dynamic security capacity using infrastructure vServices
        • Security policies auto-adapt to network reconfiguration or upgrades
      VMware vSphere™ Availability Security Scalability OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP
    • 43. DRS Ensures Capacity on Demand
        • Shrink and grow of applications based on demand and priority
        • Dynamic and responsive load balancing
      VMware vSphere™ Availability Security Scalability OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP OS APP
    • 44. Scale Up Applications for Assured QoS
        • Scalable virtual machines
        • Hot add of
          • CPU
          • Memory
        • Hot add and remove
          • S torage devices
          • Network devices
        • Hot Extend virtual disks
        • Zero downtime scale up of virtual machines
      64 GB 4 CPUs 255 GB 8 CPUs Availability Security Scalability OS APP
    • 45. Hot-Add Capacity to Guarantee QoS 2 GB 1 vCPU 8 GB 4 vCPU TPS Latency TPS Latency
        • Hot-add capacity with zero application downtime
        • Minutes to stabilize VM and recover from SLA violation
        • Other options include VMotion to more powerful host & add instance for fast scale-out
      Added new slide OS SQL OS SQL
    • 46. Next Generation Management Enhances Control vCenter Suite Application Services Infrastructure Services Scalability vSphere 4.0 Security Availability vNetwork vStorage vCompute Management
    • 47. vApp – Self Describing Applications Enable Automated SLA Management vApp Availability Security Scalability Scalability
        • Dynamic Resource Sizing
      Security
        • Clustering
        • Data Protection
      Availability
        • Firewall
        • Anti-virus
        • Intrusion Detection
        • Intrusion Prevention
      OS APP OS APP OS APP
    • 48. Extensible Management Suite VMware vCenter Suite Infrastructure Management Self Service Management Hardware vSphere SLA Driven Management Model Availability 99.99% Security High Performance .2 Milliseconds Self Service Portal Service Catalogue Billing/Chargeback Provisioning Configuration Capacity Operations Performance Availability
    • 49. Choice of End-to-End Integrated Management Physical-Only Environments/ Non-x86/Non-VMware Non-Virtual Management Tools Enterprise System Management Non-Virtualized vCenter Added script
    • 50. VMware vCenter Server 4.0 Change VMware infrastructure to VMware vSphere VMware vSphere™ Automation Unlocks the power of vSphere through proactive management Visibility Deep visibility into every level of the virtual infrastructure Scalability Scalable and extensible management platform VMware vCenter Server
    • 51. Automation with vCenter Orchestrator
        • Workflow engine for orchestrating virtualization
        • Automate manual, repeatable steps by drag and drop interface
        • Centralize workflow management for all processes associated with the environment
        • Administer and control large environments easily
        • Provide custom workflows for complex environments
      vCenter Orchestrator Edited slide and changed script
    • 52. vCenter Server: Host Profiles
        • Simplified setup and change management for ESX hosts
        • Easy detection of non-compliance with standard configurations
        • Automated remediation
      Cluster Reference Host Changed script
    • 53. vCenter Server – Linked Mode
        • Standard vSphere Client can access inventory across multiple vCenters
        • View and search across combined inventory of a group of VC Servers
        • Shared roles and license configurations
      vCenter Linked Mode Replicated licenses & roles ESXi ESX ESX ESXi ESXi ESXi ESX vCenter Server vCenter Server vCenter Server vCenter Server vCenter Server vCenter Server Changed script and slide
    • 54. Simplified License Management in vSphere 4
      • Simple license keys instead of flex
          • 1 license per edition
          • 1 key for many hosts
      • New centralized license key administration in vCenter
          • No separate license server to manage or monitor
          • Centralized host and license monitoring through vCenter enabling easy compliance
      • New license portal provides more accurate view of entitlement
    • 55. Improved Activation Process
        • VI3 License Activation Is Failure-prone
          • Too many steps and “context changes” Customers have many opportunities to get confused or take “wrong turns”
          • License files are the result of a long, multi-step portal transaction
          • Complexity illustrated: 40 pages in VI3 admin/install guide devoted to licensing
        • A Dramatically Simpler Process In VI4
          • A short and easy activation process was the single most important design requirement
          • License keys are sent in email and can be copied directly into the product – no portal activation step required
          • No separate license server means no additional installation, configuration or monitoring is required
      10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0
        • Receive activation code in email
        • Go to license portal
        • Generate new license file
        • Select license qualities to activate
        • Install license server if needed
        • Re-read license file to server
        • Product activated
        • Choose server or host-based file
        • Download or email license file
        • Upload license file
        • Configure licensing in VC/ESX UI
      3 2 1 0
        • Receive license keys in email
        • Enter license key into VC UI
        • Assign license key to ESX hosts
        • Product activated
    • 56. VMware vSphere™ 4.0 delivers Cut capital and operational costs by over 50% for all applications... … while automating quality of service… … and remaining independent of hardware, operating system, application stack, and service providers Efficiency Control Choice
    • 57. vApp – Self Describing Applications Enable Choice Availability Security Scalability vApp OS APP OS APP OS APP Internal Clouds Cloud OS Management Federation & Choice Standards External Clouds Cloud OS Management
    • 58. VMware vSphere™: Most Comprehensive OS Support VMware vSphere™ MS Hyper-V
        • Win Server 2008 (up to 4P vSMP)
        • Win Server 2003 SP2 (up to 2P vSMP)
        • Win Server 2000 SP4 (1P only)
        • SLES10 (1P only)
        • Windows Vista SP1
        • Windows XP Pro SP2/SP3
      vSphere = most guest OS-es vSphere = 4x Guest OS-es Changed bottom strip
    • 59. VMware vSphere™: Extensive Enterprise Apps Support
      • Over 300 enterprise software applications have explicit support statements for VMware vSphere today.
        • See complete list at http://www.vmware.com/partners/alliances/vendors/
        • List includes: BMC, Cisco, CA , Dell, HP, IBM, EMC, McAfee, Microsoft, Research in Motion, SAP, Symantec
      • More software vendors adding support for VMwarevSphere every month.
        • Submit requests to VMware for help to get an application supported: Click here
      VMware + Software Vendors Working together to ensure customers are supported
    • 60. Future Proof IT… Owned and Operated by IT External Cloud Internal Cloud Rented by IT Unlock new market based economies of scale, service and innovation beyond what currently exists today APP APP
    • 61. Broad Ecosystem – Technology and Service Providers
    • 62. Choice of End-to-End Integrated Management Physical-Only Environments/ Non-x86/Non-VMware Non-Virtual Management Tools Enterprise System Management Non-Virtualized vCenter
    • 63. Summary – What’s New Application Services .Net Infrastructure Services
        • Storage and network optimizations
        • DPM
        • Thin Provisioning
        • Volume Grow
        • Distributed Switch
      VMware vSphere™ 4.0 SaaS Solaris J2EE Linux Windows Web 2.0
        • Fault Tolerance
        • Data Recovery
        • vShield Zones
        • VMSafe
        • Hot Add
        • Hot plug devices
        • Hot extend disks
      Availability Security Scalability vCompute vStorage vNetwork vApp Internal Cloud External Cloud Removed VMDirectPath
    • 64. Summary of VMware vSphere™ Application Services Infrastructure Services
        • ESX
        • ESXi
        • DRS/DPM
        • VMFS
        • Thin Provisioning
        • Distributed Switch
      VMware vSphere™ 4.0 Internal Cloud External Cloud
        • VMotion
        • Storage VMotion
        • HA
        • Fault Tolerance
        • Data Recovery
        • vShield Zones
        • VMSafe
        • DRS
        • Hot Add
      Availability Security Scalability vCompute vStorage vNetwork *Note vCenter Server and its components are a separate purchase .Net SaaS Grid J2EE Linux Windows Web 2.0 vApp vCenter Suite
    • 65. VMware vSphere™ - The best choice for your business Efficiency Control Choice View in slideshow VMware’s higher consolidation ratios, higher scalability get better CapEx VMware’s services and vCenter capabilities lead to better OpEx VMware differentiated technologies like DRS, DPM, FT, VMsafe, Host Profiles, Storage VMotion, others allow IT to deliver on SLAs while maintaining control VMware strives to support whatever hardware, application stack, management stack, OS, or service provider the customer has selected VMware strategy: Remain neutral so the customer has maximum choice
    • 66. VMware vSphere™ 4.0 Delivers Lowest Cost Per Application $80,973 Windows Server DataCenter Ed. $13,089 Management SW $134,500 Storage $92,000 Server HW $27,338 Network, Power, Space $86,982 vSphere Ent Plus Lic. + SnS $434,882 (with 2 yrs support) $116,961 Windows Server DataCenter Ed. $33,446 Management SW $142,600 Server HW $144,500 Storage $43,341 Network, Power, Space $480,848 (with 2 yrs SA) 12:1 average consolidation ratio 8:1 average consolidation ratio Use the VMware Cost-per-Application Calculator to figure out your cost-per-application VMware costs 10% less AND has more functionality! Cost to deploy 100 VMs VMware vSphere 4 Enterprise Plus $4349 per App Windows Server 2008 with Hyper-V $4808 per App
    • 67. VMware vSphere: Most Efficient Efficiency Hardware Scale Out Virtual Hardware (VM) Scale Out CPU Efficiency Memory Efficiency Power Efficiency Storage Usage Efficiency Network Management Efficiency Automated Patching Efficiency Hot-add/remove Virtual Resources New capability in VMware vSphere Note: Many improvements were also made to existing VI3 capabilities x 4-way on Win08 only 64 GB vRAM x 32 logical cores 128 GB RAM ~ 24 logical cores 1 TB RAM  64 logical cores 512 GB RAM  8-way vCPU 255 GB vRAM x Req. HW-assist for Win Reuse gen-OS schdler x Requires HW-assist Reuse gen-OS schdler  CPU HW-assist or BT Virt-specific scheduler x Memory HW-assist No overcommitment x Memory HW-assist No overcommitment  Memory HW-assist Overcommit / sharing x No Cluster-level Mgmt x No Cluster-level Mgmt  DPM: Cluster-level power management x Only via 3 rd party storage vendor x None x None  Distributed switch 3 rd party virtual switch x Host patching, but no auto guest patching x Host patching causes VM downtime  Transparent host patch Auto guest patching x Thin disks, but no monitoring tools  Thin provisioning Monitoring tools  Add: vCPU, vMem Add: virtual disk x None x No hot-add CPU, mem Add: virtual disk ~ 8-way vCPU 32 GB vRAM
    • 68. VMware vSphere: Uncompromised Control Control Control for Server Maintenance Control for Storage Maintenance Control of Resource Allocation Fault Tolerance for VMs Control during NIC Failure Thin Hypervisor to Reduce Attack Surface Better Security than Physical Control during Host or VM Failure Control during Entire Site Failure New capability in VMware vSphere Note: Many improvements were also made to existing VI3 capabilities x Nothing comparable  VMware Enhanced Storage vMotion x 3 rd party for DRS No logical pools x Pro Tips has downtime No logical pools  VMware DRS Logical Resource Pool x Promised feature hasn’t shipped yet x No VM-level protection  VMware Fault Tolerance x XenServer 1.8GB disk footprint x Hyper-V w/ Server Core >2GB disk footprint  VMware ESXi 70-100MB disk footprint x Nothing comparable x Nothing comparable  VMware VMSafe API 3 rd party support x Relies on network vendor to provide  Integrated NIC teaming x Nothing comparable x Quick Migration causes downtime  VMware vMotion (w/ Enh Compatibility)  XenMotion x Only for host failure 1-VM-per-LUN issue  VMware HA Up to 32 nodes x Nothing comparable x Geo-clustering has no workflow, testing, audit  VMware Site Recovery Manager ~ Supported, but may require CLI to configure ~ Only for host failure Up to 16 nodes
    • 69. VMware vSphere: Maximum Choice Choice Choice thru Guest OS Support Choice thru Hardware Support Choice thru Application Support Integrating with Existing Mgmt Tools Choice in “Cloud” Service Provider Interoperability between Internal & External Cloud Choice in Using Existing Apps in the Cloud New capability in VMware vSphere Note: Many improvements were also made to existing VI3 capabilities x 20 OSs supported  Leader category (per leading analyst firm) x Citrix Essentials API not readily available x Apps need to be rewritten for MS cloud  Run existing apps w/o rewriting code x Very limited HCL ~100 Servers x 11 OSs supported Windows biased ~ Next-tier category (per leading analyst firm) x Building a MS-hosted offering  VMReady program for cloud providers  >30 OSs supported More Windows than MS x No clear cloud strategy x No clear cloud strategy x No clear cloud strategy x Apps in MS cloud don’t come back out  VMReady ensures interoperability ~ Can integrate, but SC competes w/ existing  Dozens of integrations vCenter API via SDK ~ Using Windows drivers Potential driver issues  Large HCL: >450 HBAs, >160 NICs,>450 Servers  Leader category (per leading analyst firm)

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