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Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
Key Performance Indicators For Libraries
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Key Performance Indicators For Libraries

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Libraries are much more than brick-and-mortar structures housing collections. They are a vital and important anchor of any community. The goal of this Key Performance Indicator (KPI) Report and …

Libraries are much more than brick-and-mortar structures housing collections. They are a vital and important anchor of any community. The goal of this Key Performance Indicator (KPI) Report and InfoStat Scorecard is to provide the all libraries with a concrete set of metrics that can be used to measure success in a digital age.

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  • 1. Key Performance Indicator Toolkit New Methods For Measuring a Library’s Community Impact
  • 2. Webbmedia Group and the Chicago Public Library invite you to discuss key performance indicators in person and online. On Twitter, please use the hashtag #KPILibrary. Copyright 2012 by Webbmedia Group Published in the United States of America in 2012 by Webbmedia Group. All rights reserved. We encourage researchers, librarians, city/county government officials and others to circulate this document and to use it with colleagues. If you choose to cite from this document, please use the following attribution: Key Performance Indicator Toolkit: New Methods For Measuring a Library’s Community Impact, by Webbmedia Group, Feb. 2012. This report will be updated frequently. For questions, updated information or any other concerns, please contact: Webbmedia Group info@webbmediagroup.com (267) 342-4300
  • 3. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 3 Introduction Every library is given the arduous task of showing the direct and indirect impacts it has on the community it serves. Libraries must protect Customer privacy, and that restriction prevents some of the usual metrics and tracking workflows used by other industries. Most libraries currently use two basic metrics to show community impact, to gauge the success of projects launched and to determine how well internal structures and systems are working: circulation and foot traffic. To be sure, a library’s worth extends far beyond the number of books moving to and from each building. Libraries are places of and for learning, whether that takes place in an electronic book, on the Internet, via text messaging or even at a face-to-face meeting with a clerk. They are also hubs for experimentation of thought and entrepreneurship, places of refuge for the very poorest community members, and help for city departments, desperately in need of research assistance. Libraries are much more than brick-and-mortar structures housing collections. They are a vital and important anchor of any community. The goal of this Key Performance Indicator (KPI) Report and InfoStat Scorecard is to provide the all libraries with a concrete set of metrics that can be used to measure success in a digital age. This document also contains: • An overview of what metrics libraries should track in the digital age • Methods for tracking these metrics • Suggestions for sharing and measuring library content that is shared • Recommendations for measuring the impact of a library’s core digital services • An InfoStat Scorecard with items to measure, input measures, output measures, strategic outcomes and preliminary benchmarks. Using this document, any library should be able to measure its KPIs and impact within its current staffing structure. No additional staff members need to be hired.
  • 4. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 4 The Changing Information Landscape The importance of having an actionable mission and tracking progress in large organizations cannot be understated and helps them in many uncountable ways, including (but not limited to): • Helping orient staff and units towards a common purpose • Understanding whether you are serving your organization’s purpose • Providing a framework for decision making when the organization must adapt to new demands • Lets others know why you exist, and why they might want to support your work • Helps leaders strategically allocate resources, especially in a constrained environment • Helps you attract and retain individuals who are inspired by the work that you do A typical library mission reflects the following: • Supports all community members in the enjoyment of reading and pursuit of lifelong learning • Helps to provide access to critical information • Provides resources for those who are in most need • Works with other city/ county agencies and offices for the public good • Believes in the freedom to learn, read and discover However, in the changing information and funding landscape, libraries across the world are evolving their missions to meet the information needs of 21st century citizens. In this changing landscape, meeting the information needs of all citizens requires: • Being deliberate about sharing information in the ways that people are consuming it. • Providing access to the technology that facilitates information sharing to people who cannot otherwise afford it • Creating spaces (virtual and physical) and providing the resources for people to create and remix information.
  • 5. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 5 Metrics and Key Performance Indicators Metrics and KPIs are used to measure the extent to which a library is meeting its mission. Although any library’s mission may be broad enough to include the technology elements listed above, it is important to be deliberate. Accordingly, this toolkit provides guidance around ways to measure success in this new landscape. There are several philosophies from the Web 2.0 world that have changed citizens’ expectations of the institutions that serve them: • Anticipating and meeting the modern/digital information needs of a library’s Customers • Sharing information in a manner that matches modern information consumption, providing access anytime and anyplace. • Providing access to and help using the technology that facilitates information sharing to people who cannot otherwise afford it • Measuring the impact of digital technology and content creation It is critical that libraries measure and track metrics in these realms to ensure that they are accomplishing the mission of a 21st century library. The following sections describe a variety of potential metrics in each of these realms. Please note that the specific questions used in the below section are just examples. If your organization decides to implement a particular metric, we recommend additional research and time spent to develop rigorous questions based on a nuanced understanding of your organization’s activities, resources, and typical patron behavior. We have identified four top-level categories for measurement: 1. Are the digital information needs of library customers being met? Note: “Customers” include local patrons, other city departments, local public and private schools, other local community organizations, non-local people (tourists, others from around the state). We will refer to all those who use the library as Customers for the rest of this toolkit. 2. How well are Customers receiving and sharing library information? 3. Is the library enabling technology access to Customers who otherwise cannot afford it? 4. How are Customers using the library’s digital content?
  • 6. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 6 1. Are the digital information needs of library customers being met? Libraries have traditionally been one of the primary sources of information for citizens. The Internet, however, has liberated much of the information that was once only contained in physical artifacts. In order to remain relevant libraries need to ensure that they are adapting to this new environment, meeting the information needs of their Customers and providing the unique curation, expert advice, and services that their Customers demand and which the library is well poised to provide. The following metrics will give any library the ability to understand what services Customers are most requesting, and develop new programs to meet their Customers’ needs. Metric What to Measure Methodology A. Customer Satisfaction with the library’s Digital Technology Measure the satisfaction and productivity level of each Customer with regards to technology usage. • Quick polls used at: • Computer terminals before Customer session ends. • Scantron surveys • Touch screen monitors at building exits • iPad survey stands at circulation desks • Various mandatory electronic surveys B. Direct Customer Support Number and type of face-to- face Customer interactions. • Staff members keep a standardized electronic log of the work that is done. C. Technology Support Number and type of face-to- face Customer interactions having solely to do with technology support. • Staff members keep a standardized electronic log of the work that is done. D. Digital Literacy for in- house technical assistance programs Track and assess the knowledge, progress and newly-acquired skills of Customers using this program. • Simple evaluation after each program interaction. • Detailed evaluation for longer-term work with program managers. Overview:
  • 7. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 7 A. Metric: Customer Satisfaction with a Library’s Digital Technology Description: Measure the satisfaction and productivity level of each Customer with regards to technology usage. Methods of Measurement: • Quick poll shown at final screen before Customer logs off of computer. Required to terminate visit. • Quick poll via paper (scantron) survey (voluntary) • Quick poll via touch screen monitors at building exits (voluntary) • Quick poll via iPad, docked at each circulation desk (mandatory) • Quick poll via library website. Used for library services, such as putting books on hold, etc. A slightly different user interface would be designed for each method of input, however the questions would be standardized across all input methods. Strategic Objective: 1. Use the data collected to understand what users want and need, and focus technology acquisition/ offerings/ support efforts in that area. 2. Quantify amount of digital services provided to Customers and for what purpose.
  • 8. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 8 Suggested Poll Questions: ● Why are you using a library computer? ○ I don’t have a computer at home/work/school. ○ I don’t have Internet access at home/work/school. ○ I have Internet access, but it’s too slow at home/work/school. ○ The library has the software I need. ● Did you perform the work you intended on this computer today? ○ Yes ○ No ■ If no, why not? ● The Internet was too slow. ● I didn’t have the right software ○ What software do you need? (text box input or dropdown menu) ○ I didn’t have enough time on the computer. ● I didn’t know how to use the (dropdown input) ○ computer ○ software ○ website ● Other (text box input) ● Was your work on this computer today for [dropdown - multiple choices are acceptable] Choices: email, research, work, school, recreation/entertainment, socializing, or other (text box input) ● Was your work for entertainment, academic or professional reasons? (mark all that apply) ● How would you rate your experience at the library today? (10 Great -- 1 Poor) ○ Comments (text box input) ● What is the most valuable digital service provided by the library: ○ Ability to place books on hold through the library website. ○ Library updates via social media channels. ○ Online resources (online research and reference materials, e.g., OED, Chilton’s, Medline, etc.). ○ Office software - word processing, spreadsheets, presentation. ○ Internet access. ○ Digital books and e-book access. ○ Printing ○ WiFi ● What is one thing that you wish the library would do more of using digital technology? (Optional comment section - text box input)
  • 9. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 9 B. Metric: Direct Customer Support Description: All library staff who interact with Customers (Customers, city departments) should keep a log of their Customer activity. This will show the direct value a library is providing Customers, to other city departments, to schools and to others in the community. It should be able to demonstrate the volume of work being done over the phone, via digital outlets (email, text messaging, social media) and in person. Methods of Measurement: Staff would be required to either log time directly into a database or would keep a log sheet with them to enter at the end of their work day. Google Forms can be used to track this either over a three- month period or indefinitely. Information would be brought into a spreadsheet to which only administrators have access. Strategic Objective: 1. Use the data collected to understand what requests are being made of reference librarians and other staff, and develop strategies that meet their needs and support staff in delivering high quality services. 2. Quantify the number of FTEs that are required to fulfill the library’s mission to the city/county and to the community. Tracking this data should show, empirically, that more cannot be done with less. Stasis also cannot be done with less. A corollary is making sure staff are spending their time doing high-value work. (e.g., if you discover the librarians near the entrances are spending most of their time directing Customers to where things are, think about less expensive ways to accomplish that so they can be free to help Customers with getting to the info resources they need or some other higher value work.) 3. Quantify the types of Customer interactions at the library, in order to reveal what services and information Customers are seeking (without sacrificing their privacy). 4. Quantify what staff are doing, and how the library can better support or direct staff. 5. Quantify under-utilized staff members and offer insights into how to make their contributions more meaningful.
  • 10. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 10 Suggested Log Fields: • Staff Type or Staff ID • Location (dropdown choice - names of all branches) • Time (automatically fills) • Date (automatically fills) • Activity (dropdown choice to ensure data can be tracked and parsed. All staff have access to same activity choices) • Customer Type (dropdown - Customer, city staff member, etc) • Optional: Staff enters outcome. “I did ______.”
  • 11. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 11 C. Metric: Technology Support Description: All library staff who interact with Customers (Customers, city departments) should keep a log of the support they give around technology. This will show the extent to which Customers and partners rely on and need technology support, and will provide a rationale for investments in this realm. Methods of Measurement: Staff would be required to either log time directly into a database or would keep a log sheet with them to enter at the end of their work day. Google Forms can be used to track this either over a three- month period or indefinitely. Information would be brought into a spreadsheet to which only administrators have access. Strategic Objective: 1. Understand where to make strategic technology investments on an ongoing basis 2. Understand where to develop digital trainings/supports for librarians so they can better serve Customers
  • 12. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 12 Suggested Log Fields: ● Type of staff (drop-down selection of people who work in the library) ○ Librarian ○ Desk clerk ○ Security guard ● Location ○ dropdown choice - names of all branches ● Time (automatic) ● Date (automatic) ● Duration of interaction ○ 0-1 minute ○ 1-5 minutes ○ 5-10 minutes ○ 10+ minutes ● Type of question ○ Downloadable media ○ Computer sign-up system ○ Printing ○ Desktop applications ○ Browsing the web ○ Finding specific online resources ○ Databases ○ How to use Customer’s own equipment ○ Wireless network
  • 13. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 13 D. Metric: Digital Literacy / In-House Technical Assistance Participation Description: The in-house technical assistance program reaches across many of the branches at the library, and has the potential to transform Customer’s digital literacy. All participants in this program should be tracked and assessed on their progress. Specific evaluations should be created based on the specific curriculum for each program, but should assess the extent to which Customer’s literacy in each area has improved as a result of their participation. Methods of Measurement: Individual assessments administered by library staff. These can be short quizzes at the end of a session, or more detailed exams at the end of a teaching session, seminar or class series. Strategic Objective: 1. Understand where to make strategic in-house technical assistance program investments on an ongoing basis. 2. Show increased digital literacy as a result of an in-house technical assistance program.
  • 14. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 14 2. How well are Customers receiving and sharing Library information? E. Metric: Accessing E-Content Description: The extent to which Customers are accessing e-content is just as important as understanding circulation figures. Libraries who are embracing digital need to reposition themselves as a place for knowledge and ideas in all its forms. Their role is to provide access to information, and both the information and the way people expect to access it are shifting rapidly. Methods of Measurement: Acquisitions and collections manager should be responsible for reporting on inputs (number of items in the collection) and the IT manager should be required to report on the extent to which Customers are accessing content once per month. Strategic Objective: • To understand the extent to which Customers are accessing digital artifacts in order to improve performance. • Develop strategies to promote access. • Highlight popular content. • Make better digital acquisition decisions.
  • 15. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 15 Metric What to Measure Methodology Usage of Downloadable Media • Number of downloads • Turnover of downloadable media Overdrive data Online Research • Number of times databases are accessed (inside a library or remotely) • Time spent on databases • Turnover Website analytics and database usage data Digital Collections • Total visits • Unique visits • Pageviews • Bounce rate • Turnover (total collection number/ total views) • Time spent with digital collections Website analytics and database usage data Website Usage • Total visits • Unique visits • Pageviews • Bounce rate • Content reports: trending content, entrance paths, exit paths • Time spent on site • Inbound links • Inbound links from search • Other traditional web metrics Website analytics Searching the Catalogue • Category distribution • What users are searching for • Number of visits to catalogue • Number of holds placed online Website analytics and database usage data
  • 16. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 16 F. Engaging With Socially Shared Content Description: There are many ways a library can measure its success and return on investment in the social space. It is important to note that the number of Facebook and Twitter followers alone is not indicative of effective social communication. Instead, engagement should be monitored. Please see the Social Media Toolkit section of this report. We have abridged sections of this Toolkit for additional reference.
  • 17. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 17 3. Is the Library enabling technology access to Customers who otherwise cannot afford it? G. Metric: Computer Productivity and Usage Description: Measure the amount of time each Customer is using each piece of software on every machine. This will help a library to show its impact in the community. Methods of Measurement: IT director should run daily, weekly and monthly logs to see what digital services library Customers have used, the amount of time spent on each and perhaps even their activity paths. Strategic Objective: • To understand the extent to which Customers rely on the library to close the digital divide. • To understand what products and services are used most by the community in order to serve them better.
  • 18. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 18 Suggested Metrics ● Inputs (system-wide and by individual library location) ○ Number of computer terminals available per capita ○ Computer usage rates (i.e. hours of computer time demanded / hours of computer time available) ○ Computer wait times ○ Access to computer services per capita ● Outputs. Example: Session #24492 (Customer data is disaggregated from behavior observed) ○ Word 10.2 minutes ○ Excel .3 minutes ○ Internet Explorer 35.6 minutes ○ http://google.com 3 visits, 10.2 minutes ○ http://jobs.com 1 visit, 35.9 minutes Additional Metrics ● Total number of pages printed ● WiFi Use. We suggest adding a quick survey to the library’s clickthru user agreement to find out why Customers are using the library's WiFi, and perhaps to find out what they would do to get Internet access if the library did not offer WiFi. ○ total number of unique users by location ○ average bandwidth utilization
  • 19. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 19 4. How are Customers using the Library’s digital content? People are no longer just consumers of content, but producers as well, and the role of the library is to provide access to the knowledge and resources to help people learn the skills needed to participate in and accomplish work/ tasks in this changing landscape. To continue to deliver services in accordance with their missions, libraries must change what they offer and how they operate to stay relevant to their communities and support them in creating knowledge, rather than just accessing it. )This isn’t just about teaching Customers how to use technology, but also bringing all of the libraries resources to bear to actually create something of use/value to the greater community. Furthermore, the library can be a place of safety and comfort as well, and the transformational experiences had within its walls can be just as meaningful as any pieces of content that are created. H. Metric: Community-Produced Projects and Stories Description: Content created by the library community about their library experiences and personal/ professional relationships to the library. Methods of Measurement: Create a Tumblr account (and associated campaign) which collects stories from Customers (using text, videos, images, and/or audio) about the impact that the library has had on their lives. Using Tumblr is easy because it is already built to accept submissions in a variety of formats and librarians may already be familiar with the tool. To support implementation, we suggest creating a tipsheet for Customers that is displayed by the computer terminals as well as at the check-out counters and other high-traffic areas. Staff should also be familiar with the campaign and be able to provide support to Customers looking to participate. The Tumblr will offer a series of questions for Customers to respond to. Examples: 1. How has the library impacted your life? 2. What do you get out of the library? 3. What is the most important thing the library offers? Customers would offer their own personal stories describing a transformational experience they had at the library, or description (visual or otherwise) of something they created in the library. The author of the story that generates the most “likes” over the course of the year will win a prize. Although it won’t produce reliable quantitative measures it will provide stories that reinforce the quantitative input and output metrics collected throughout the organization.
  • 20. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 20 Strategic Objective: • To understand the extent to which Customers rely on the library website to close the digital divide. • To show qualitatively how the library impacts its community. Potential strategies to improve performance: • Creating spaces (virtual and physical) for people to create and remix information. • Share these stories with City Hall and the public to gain additional resources and/or support for increased investments in library services.
  • 21. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 21 InfoStat and Library Digital Impact Scorecard Each month the library commissioner will hold an InfoStat session, where each responsible unit head will report on their assigned metrics, discuss the strategies that they have been pursuing to reach those metrics and their plans for improvement. Having a monthly meeting will: 1. Create a set of standard metrics that can be reported up to City Hall or County Government on a regular basis. 2. Create incentives for leaders within the library to collect and track metrics that are important to show the success of the agency. 3. Create areas of clear responsibility for members of the library leadership team. 4. Create a collaborative space for team members to discuss concrete ways to improve performance. 5. Help library leadership know the extent to which the agency is delivering on its mission. The Library Digital Impact Scorecard follows on the next page:
  • 22. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 22 Library Digital Impact Scorecard Key Performance Indicator Initial Benchmark Assessment Digital Sensei Achievement. (Note: this is a training curriculum and guide we created for the Chicago Public Library) All staff meet initial goals for first year. Evaluate every six months Customer Satisfaction With Library’s Digital Technology Have a tracking system in place and all library Customers inputting information within one year. Evaluate weekly Direct Customer Support All staff use logging system within six months. Evaluate weekly Direct Customer Technology Support All staff use logging system within six months. Evaluate weekly Digital Literacy / In-House Digital Assistance Program Have a tracking system in place and all current program participants assessed within one year Evaluate monthly Accessing E-Content See Addendum B. Evaluate daily Engaging With Socially- Shared Content See Social Media Toolkit for a detailed description. Evaluate daily Participation in Digital Events (Livechats, Livestreamed video, etc.) Evaluations immediately after first events are streamed; use participation as a baseline for future events. Evaluate during every event Computer Productivity and Usage All activity monitored within six months. Evaluate daily Community-Produced Projects and Stories 10 stories per month Evaluate weekly
  • 23. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 23 InfoStat Dashboard We recommend using Google Forms with the following information for the library’s InfoStat. Each unit head should complete each field, and commissioners should review in advance of the InfoStat meeting. InfoStat Field Example Responsible library Staff Member Social Media Manager Category Audience Engagement Metric Value 200 Unit Retweets Description of Metric The number of times a Customer retweeted a library-generated tweet Change from last month +25 Analysis This month we released a reading list related to holiday recipes, which proved to be extremely popular. Strategies We will include a holiday recipe list as part of our editorial calendar for each major holiday.
  • 24. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 24 Appendix A - Standard Metrics Recommended For All Libraries To Track The following metrics were developed using the following library indexes as a guide: • HAPLR Index - http://www.haplr-index.com/ • Library Journal (LJ) Index of Library Services - http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6636641.html Tracking the metrics below can help a library understand the health of its system compared to other systems. Working to improve these measures will help to create a platform on top of which a library can measure improved performance and move more firmly into the digital age.
  • 25. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 25 Customers: Accessing information and services, visiting branches, attending events, strengthening community. Input Measures Output Measure Strategic Objective Items to measure: • Number of items in physical collection • Periodicals per 1000 residences (HAPLR) • Volumes per capita (HAPLR) Items to measure: • circ per visit (HAPLR), • circ per capita (LJ, HAPLR) • circ per hour (HAPLR), • Collection turnover rate (circulation/total holdings) (HAPLR) Increase access to physical resources and ensure the collection is meeting patrons’ needs • Items to measure: • Hours of operation • Items to measure: • Visits per capita (LJ, HAPLR), • Visits per hour (HAPLR) Increase visits to physical libraries and identify busy days/times for staffing • Items to measure: • Number of reference librarians/population (in FTEs) • Items to measure: • Number of reference transactions (per capita, per librarian, etc) • Reference per capita (HAPLR) Increase usage of librarians as reference points. Relative importance of reference and staffing
  • 26. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 26 Staff: Learning, Growth and Innovation Internal Business Processes: the Library is a well-oiled machine, providing effective public service Input Measures Output Measure Strategic Objective Items to measure: • Number of clerks staffed in libraries per capita Items to measure: • circ/staff • Average wait time to complete a task (check- out book, return book, pay fine, etc) Improve efficiency of transactions; decrease time it takes to process Customer needs Items to measure: • Assessment of late fees Items to measure: • Percentage of late fees collected Increase percentage of late fees collected Items to measure: • Number of blocked cards Items to measure: • Percentage patrons with blocked cards • Percentage of youth cards blocked Increase access to the collection and services Items to measure: • Number of staff assigned shelve materials per circulation Items to measure: • Average time needed to shelve materials • Average time to attach a hold Decrease time it takes to shelve materials and holds. Reduce patron wait time to receive holds. Items to measure: • Number of crates delivered per day • Number of crates delivered by library location • Number of staff hours assigned to redistributing materials Items to measure: • Crates delivered/staff • Time to deliver materials to other branches Decrease time it takes to deliver materials to other branches. Improve efficiency of materials movement
  • 27. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 27 Input Measures Output Measure Strategic Objective Items to measure: • Number of digital training programs available to staff Items to measure: • Number and percentage of staff participating • Number of new qualifications earned (see digital professional development plan) • Number of classes administered/ taken (see digital professional development plan) • Number of library staff reaching Sensei level (see digital professional development plan) Increase number of librarians who have strong digital literacy. Encourage participation.
  • 28. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 28 Finances: Fundraising, Expenditure, Strategic Budgeting Input Measures Output Measure Strategic Objective Items to measure: • Book sale revenue as percentage of cost NA Increase library revenue over time Items to measure: • Amount of revenue raised from Library Foundation • Percentage of unrestricted revenue from Foundation Increase library revenue over time Items to measure: • Amount of revenue raised from the city • Percentage of budget revenue from city Increase library revenue over time Items to measure: • Amount of revenue received from the state • Percentage of budget revenue from state Increase library revenue over time Items to measure: • Amount of revenue raised from the federal government and grants • Percentage of budget revenue from federal and grant sources Increase library revenue over time Items to measure: • Number of FTEs • Salary and benefit expenses • FTE/capital • Percentage of professional staff • Management/staff ratio • Percentage of budget for salaries • Percentage of budget for benefits Staff capacity (sufficient staff to provide services) Items to measure: • Percentage of staff who are part time NA TBD Items to measure: • Cost per Customer served • cost/circ • cost/reference question Increase efficiency/ decrease cost per Customer served
  • 29. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 29 Input Measures Output Measure Strategic Objective Items to measure: • Total expenditures Items to measure: • ROI (market value of services/total expenditures) or time cost (users time spent at library * average user salary) Increase ROI Items to measure: • Expenditures per capita (HAPLR) NA Provide a benchmark to compare performance to other libraries Items to measure: • Percent budget to materials (HAPLR) NA Provide a benchmark to compare performance to other libraries Items to measure: • Materials expenditure per capita (HAPLR) NA Provide a benchmark to compare performance to other libraries Items to measure: • FTE staff per 1000 population (HAPLR) NA Provide a benchmark to compare performance to other libraries Items to measure: • Cost per circulation (HAPLR) NA Increase efficiency/ decrease cost per circulation Items to measure: • Circulation per FTE staff hour (HAPLR) NA Decrease circulation per FTE staff hour A note about impact measures Most of the measures above are focused on inputs and outputs, rather than outcomes and impact: • Input = measurable item that an organization contributes (work, information, funding, materials, etc) • Activities = actions taken using the inputs • Output = the results of the inputs and activities • Impact/Outcome = the effect that the outputs have on people, things, or the bottom line
  • 30. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 30 Appendix B - Tracking Web Metrics The following are standard Web metrics used across many industries. Library Audience Base Metrics To Track Assessment Library Website • # of RSS subscribers • # of daily readers • # of return readers • # of comments • # of referring websites/ blogs • # of members signing in • frequency of members signing in • What is your most-viewed content? Why? • How can that content be optimized? • What kind of content are the most sticky, producing forwards and mentions? Why? • Is all of your content showing up in search results? • Who is linking to your content? • Are you seeing additional media coverage because of your content? • What keywords are being associated with your content? Are those keywords accurate? • What time of day is your traffic highest? Lowest? Why? Can you benefit from this knowledge?
  • 31. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 31 To be sure, it is relatively easy to measure inputs, activities, and outputs. Understanding these measures give you an indication of the potential impact your efforts can have. But ultimately, judging the quality or impact of what you create is very difficult to do and is not an activity to be taken lightly: ● It is very difficult to plan for specific outcomes without having some measure of control over the patron’s experience. Example: a library cannot compel patrons to use the computers to update their resumes if what they want to do is read comics in the stacks ● Everyone comes to the library from a different baseline, with different expectations and goals ● Impact might not be observed until many years after the experience ● It is very difficult to trace the impact that one input has on a person’s behavior. For example, it will be difficult to trace the impact that literacy programs at the library have on a student’s academic success compared to their work during regular school hours ● Privacy issues complicate the collection of data in libraries ● Impact assessments require long-term data sets, which are hard to collect in a library setting ● Testing outcomes and impact are very expensive However, if a library is able to receive funding to look at the impact of its work in the community, we advise thinking about the library’s larger mission and try to measure impact. Our recommendations include: 1. Literacy a. Early childhood b. Teen c. Adult d. Digital 2. Academic Accomplishment a. Professional Accomplishment b. Cultural Inclusion c. Outreach to un/underserved communities 3. Economic Growth a. Jobs created using resources from the library b. Jobs provided by the library and library services c. Business idea incubator 4. Civic Involvement a. Community Organizing 5. Closing the Digital Divide a. Providing access to technology for un/underserved groups
  • 32. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 32 TOOLKITS How To Track Critical Information at Library Events.
  • 33. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 33 Collecting Data at Events Many libraries do not currently employ a methodology to track events in detail. While many library events are very successful, a lack of data about attendees, beneficiaries, challenges, outcomes and community impact can prevent a library from creating a strategy to optimize future events. While data are certainly required by city/ county officials, without data, many libraries are missing an opportunity to show a direct impact on local departments, funders and partners. In addition: • Data can show whether your event was successful, as you define success. Collecting and analyzing data helps you see whether the event you planned me your own benchmarks and if you achieved your desired results. • Data can reveal factors that caused your event to be a success and highlight areas for improvement. • Data can show connections between factors that may have an effect on the results of your event.  For example, is there a correlation between the time of year you hold an event and the number of participants? • Data can provide you with credible evidence to show your stakeholders that the library’s efforts are successful, or that you’ have discovered and are are addressing limitations. Stakeholders will desire this information and your analysis. • Data can improve future events.
  • 34. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 34 Data to Track During events, there are a number of different kinds of data that can be collected by the library. We’ve divided data into five key areas: • Data to show the number and kind of people directly impacted • Data to show the return on investment for event programming • Data to show immediate outcomes • Data to show the number and kind of people indirectly impacted • Data to show mid and long-term outcomes How to Track the Data In order to collect this data, a number of questions must be asked directly to event participants. In other cases, staff hours, profit/ loss, facility/ equipment impact and the like can be used as data. Data can be collected by counting or direct measurable survey responses (quantitative) and also by direct observation, interviews or other methods (qualitative). The way that you collect data should related to how you will analyze and use it, as well as what methods of collection are reasonable and practical for your event. A solid plan should be developed well in advance of the event, and methods of tracking and measurement should be developed and tested before the event begins. All data should be collected by library staff during, and not after the event. Staff can circulate during events with an iPad to collect data from event participants. Using Google Forms and Spreadsheets or another program, staff can ask a series of very short questions and enter answers onto iPads, similar to how Apple retail employees circulate among visitors to gather demographic and other information. The goal is to learn more about event participants.
  • 35. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 35 Questions asked by staff should include: • Are you a library member? • Yes • No • Not eligible • How often do you come to the library? • Daily • Weekly • Monthly • A few times a year • First time • Why did you come to this event? • [Answer choices specifically related to event. “To hear about...” “To play with...” “For a school project...” etc.] Observations made by staff should include: • Demographic information • Male/ Female • Child/ Young Adult/ Adult/ Senior • Race: Caucasian, Asian, Hispanic, Black or African American, Alaska Native or American Indian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, Other/ Unsure.
  • 36. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 36 A library should aim to engage a minimum number of participants at each event in this data collection. The benchmark for each event should be set independently based on size, staff/ volunteer availability and event length. In addition to direct observation of attendees, other data should be collected in the five key areas noted above. While this is not meant to be a comprehensive list, some examples of what to track include: Data to show the number and kind of people directly impacted: • Count total number of attendees. Staff or volunteers can stand at doors with mechanical counters, or specially-outfitted mats that can track foot traffic can be used. Collect this data from each entrance to learn your total count. • Count the number of attendees participating in specific activities at the event. Log the number of visitors to booths, the number of activities completed, the number of books distributed. Example: At a large event where passes, name badges or passports are being distributed, include a QR or other barcode that can be scanned at each activity. When attendees check in, their badge is scanned. When an activity is completed, they receive a stamp or sticker that also contains a barcode that is scanned. This data will show the number of activities being attempted and completed and can inform the library of which activities are most meaningful, which are too challenging (or not interesting enough to participants) and the like. • Count the average time attendees stay at the event. Log when attendees enter the facility and begin tracking the time that they leave using a log sheet, a Google Form or other tracking system. This will help a library to understand the interest level of attendees, the program/ event effectiveness and how to improve the program for the future.
  • 37. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 37 Data to show the return on investment for event programming: • Create a budget for each event listing direct and indirect costs. These might include catering, beverages, staff planning time, staff hours during the event, post-event staff hours, t-shirts, etc. Track income and expenditures. Develop a benchmark and set of goals for the event’s budget. • Do analysis to see who benefitted from the event. Include tangible and intangible incomes/ benefits as well as direct and indirect incomes/ benefits. Data to show immediate outcomes: • Staff can circulate using iPads to ask and observe demographic information at the beginning of the event. Towards the middle/ end of the event, the same staff can offer a feedback form to attendees that asks a few simple questions. We recommend using rating scales rather than asking only for comments. For example, Google Forms could be used to ask: • Rate today’s event from 10 (great!) to 1 (poor). • Rate today’s content/ speaker/ panel/ activity/ etc. from 10 to 1. • Rate the food/ drink/ band/ etc. from 10 to 1. • How did you get here? (walk, my own car, taxi, metro, bicycle, other) • Do you have a library card? (yes/ no) • Would you be interested in learning more about the library and receiving our newsletter? (If yes, type in email address) • Define a set of benchmarks to achieve at each event and track a library’s progress during the event itself. These benchmarks will vary depending on the event. Examples: • Distribute 5,000 books • Read to 100 children • Assist 100 job seekers
  • 38. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 38 Data to show the number and kind of people indirectly impacted: • Develop a list of all non-attendees who were involved in the event. Examples might include: 4 Foundation members, 36 public school teachers, 29 area nursery/ pre-school teachers, etc. • Also develop a list of everyone who benefitted. Examples might include: any police officers who were paid overtime for their work, metro (5,000 people arrived at the library using public transportation), teachers who were able to count the program as classwork, etc. Data to show mid and long-term outcomes: • Using the benchmarks you created, see what can be tracked throughout the year. For example, if a library is giving out 5,000 books to area youth, what methods can be used to track whether or not the recipient has read the book? Ideas for tracking might include: Hosting an essay contest about the book to recipients and offering a prize; issuing a certificate to parents to fill out once their child/ren has completed the book and redeeming it for a prize; asking recipients to read the book aloud on video and upload the video to Tumblr/ YouTube to redeem a prize.
  • 39. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 39 Analyzing Event Data Once a library has collected event data, it must examine it to learn patterns, trends, achievements, missed targets and the like. Quantitative data can be analyzed to learn: • Whether a library’s benchmarks have been met. • Trends and patterns in attendees. • Frequency of attendance/ attendee behavior. • Survey results. • ROI per event. Qualitative data can be analyzed to learn: • Attendee needs, desires, expectations. • Satisfaction rate and general mood at/ after events. • What tactics and procedures are working at the library and which ones aren’t. • Patterns among library members and visitors. Interpreting the Results Once a library has gathered and analyzed event data, it can interpret results to learn whether or not benchmarks and goals were met, what worked, what didn’t work, and what can be done for the future. We recommend holding a short event postmortem to discuss results. This meeting should occur as close to the event as possible, when memories are still fresh.
  • 40. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 40 TOOLKITS How to Use Social Media At/For a Library System (excerpt)
  • 41. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 41 Introduction With the advent of Facebook, Twitter, blogging, mobile cameras and easy access to broadband, the way that communities share information has dramatically changed. Libraries can and should harness current and future social networks to help promote events on-site, to increase awareness of library activities, to provide patron services, and to drive community engagement. This section is an excerpt from our Social Media Toolkit For Libraries. It has been designed to help a library understand the landscape of social media as it relates to a library’s specific concerns and Customers. It also contains recommendations and instructions on: • designing an overall social media strategy • launching campaigns • creating content • measuring impact in the community • measuring staff ROI • a practical social media workflow • a system for reporting and measuring campaigns • a social media policy In addition, this toolkit offers a comprehensive social media glossary and a list of recommended tools for illustration and further insight. The goal of this toolkit is to help libraries harness social media while working within current staffing structure. No additional staff members need to be hired, however we do recommend adding some social media tasks to some existing workloads.
  • 42. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 42 Social Media Strategy For Libraries Libraries typically use social media accounts in order to promote events. Using social media accounts in a more comprehensive way will help to increase circulation and foot traffic in the libraries, but it will also help patrons access information more easily, learn about the various resources a library has to offer, and engender a community that supports and benefits from the library. Many libraries currently use a combination of a single Twitter feed and a single Facebook account as primary accounts. Recommendations: Libraries should consider using different accounts for specific purposes. In addition, we recommend that a team of people contribute to the accounts. The chart below offers examples of services/ accounts, along with descriptions for how each should be used. Note that Twitter and Facebook have not been included, as most libraries already use these networks.
  • 43. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 43 NAME OF ACCOUNT SERVICE/ SOCIAL NETWORK PURPOSE AUDIENCE FREQUENCY OF POSTS MyCityLibrary Flickr Feature photographs from library events. Local citizens, event attendees/ hosts, library supporters, staff During and immediately after events. MyCityLibrary Tumblr Display information from @MyCityLibrary. Local citizens, library supporters, staff Daily MyCityLibraryProject Tumblr Use for a project Project participants, local citizens, library supporters, staff During the project and after MyCityLibrary YouTube Channel Publish video of events held at the library for others to view. Local citizens, event attendees/ hosts, library supporters, staff, people interested in the speaker/ performer Immediately after live event.
  • 44. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 44 NAME OF ACCOUNT SERVICE/ SOCIAL NETWORK PURPOSE AUDIENCE FREQUENCY OF POSTS MyCityLibrary Livestream Live stream video of events held at library for others to view. Local citizens, event attendees/ hosts, library supporters, staff, people interested in the speaker/ performer During events. MyCityLibrary CoverItLive Liveblog and host live chats during events or for special occasions. Local citizens, event attendees/ hosts, library supporters, staff, people interested in the speaker/ performer During events. MyCityLibrary Quora Participate in the greater discussion about libraries; answer questions about your local area; be seen as a forward- thinking expert on libraries. Tech-savvy network users, library enthusiasts, local citizens, supporters, staff Weekly MyCityLibrary Foursquare Create a digital place for the library on a mobile social network; offer tips and ideas about your area and the library itself. Tech-savvy network users, library enthusiasts, local citizens, supporters, staff Once the network and tips have been set up, there would be no need to post on a regular basis.
  • 45. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 45 NAME OF ACCOUNT SERVICE/ SOCIAL NETWORK PURPOSE AUDIENCE FREQUENCY OF POSTS MyCityLibrary Scribd To share brochures, press releases, announcements, reports and other text-based content across networks. Local citizens, library supporters, staff Anytime there is a new press release, brochure or report. MyCityLibrary SlideShare To share brochures, presentations, press releases, announcements, reports and other text-based content across networks. Local citizens, library supporters, staff Anytime there is a new press release, presentation, brochure or report. Notes On Branch-Maintained Accounts: After careful consideration, we recommend against most libraries authorizing branch-specific social media accounts. Segmenting library messaging could lead to a dilution of the brand and confusion among social media users. Instead, branches should coordinate with the main library social media team to publicize readings, events, activities, closures and other issues related to each location. To be sure, every library system is different. There may be some cases where a branch- maintained account would make better sense.
  • 46. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 46 Practical Workflow: Managing Networks An effective social media strategy at any library requires a team of people all working towards the same set of objectives. We recommend that one person be designated as the social media strategist. S/ he should oversee all social media efforts, and a team of three or four trusted delegates should be brought together to aid in managing the networks. In theory, new hires need to be made at most libraries. Instead, we recommend identifying staff members who show a keen interest in social media and who are responsible and trustworthy enough to participate in messaging. Coordinating Content A social media editorial plan should be developed each month that organizes messaging for all of the upcoming events and activities a library intends to highlight...........
  • 47. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 47 While this process may seem tedious at first, mapping out a library’s social communications once a month will streamline the posting process and will help to ensure that enough content is being distributed to keep each network active. Please note that a library should still plan to read content in each network every day, and to supplement the plan with responses, retweets and reposts, breaking- news content and other current information. Workflow Monthly: We recommend scheduling all of the messages in your quarterly communications plan in advance using HootSuite. Messages to Twitter, Facebook and Foursquare can be scheduled using its bulk upload tool........... Daily: We recommend using either TweetDeck or HootSuite to monitor and read your networks. To maximize productivity: • Set your accounts to send a group email if anyone tweets you a concern or question. As soon as you receive a message, respond via Twitter. Make sure other team members know. • Check your other Twitter accounts and your Facebook account three times a day: In the morning, during lunch, and before you leave for the evening. We recommend also checking the accounts after business hours, however this would not be necessary until your library has more dedicated social media staff. • HootSuite will allow up to five people to tweet from Twitter and Facebook accounts. It can be configured so that initials of the staff member are shown at the end of the tweet or Facebook post. • Aim to write one Tumblr post a day and one blog post a day. Content should not be redundant............
  • 48. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 48 Designing Individual Campaigns Using Social Media In addition to an overall social media strategy, creating a special campaign around an event or cause can also prove beneficial. It is important to create a different set of goals and measurements for individual campaigns. Individual campaigns should be launched during any city/ county-wide collaborations, for large-scale activities or for high-profile events. Individual campaigns should not be designed for book readings, workshops or smaller events happening at the libraries. Several questions should be outlined and answered while creating an individual social media campaign. These questions can also be used to reevaluate a library’s overall social strategy throughout the year. We recommend using the template on the following pages to create an individual campaign...........
  • 49. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 49 Recommended Social Media Tools Libraries should use a number of different social media accounts and tools for each task. While there are literally thousands of possibilities available, we recommend the following for use by the public relations staff. Please note that this list may be outdated within a month or two. The social media ecosystem is constantly evolving. We recommend that all libraries stay current with the latest tools and networks. Social Networks Twitter: http://www.twitter.com Twitter is one of the most important real-time information networks in use today. • @MyCityLibrary • @MyLibraryCares - Suggested new account, to be used for Customer service only. We recommend that libraries create an email account just for this Twitter feed. It should be checked by a team of staff members throughout the day, every day. • @MyLibraryReference - Suggested new account, to be used for reference questions only. We recommend that one librarian be assigned to monitor this account during regular business hours (or a team of people can monitor it). Questions should be answered as quickly as possible. Facebook: http://www.facebook.com Facebook is used my hundreds of millions of people worldwide. It’s a great place to build a support base and to encourage library support. • We recommend using only one main Facebook account for most libraries. Information from branches should be fed through this account. • We also recommend that libraries create an email account just for its Facebook account. It should be checked by a team of staff members throughout the day, every day. Foursquare: http://www.foursquare.com Foursquare is a mobile social network that uses location. Members of this network “check in” to a location, letting others know their whereabouts. Virtual messages, tips, photos, URLs and more can be attached to a physical location for others to see. Foursquare also includes a gaming element. When challenges are met, members receive colorful merit badges that display on their profile. Points are also awarded to encourage participation. • We recommend that libraries use an official Foursquare account to leave tips and messages about the library, famous writers, local historical facts and other information about the local area/ literacy via Foursquare. This will increase brand awareness and will encourage social participation.
  • 50. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 50 Utilities Bitly: http://bitly.com Bitly is a URL shortener used to keep the number of characters low in Twitter and Facebook posts. It also allows you to track metrics on each link shared. See the number of people who have clicked on a link you post, as well as whether they have shared the link with others, when they clicked on the link and more. Bitly should be used for every link posted on any account. Shorten it with bitly first, then post to networks and via multimedia press releases. TweetDeck: http://www.tweetdeck.com Tweetdeck is an application that you download to your desktop. It allows you to use multiple accounts (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn) on a single dashboard. You can also create lists, track hashtags and keywords and the like. Hootsuite: http://www.hootsuite.com Hootsuite is a web-based application that allows you to use multiple accounts on a single dashboard. Hootsuite also allows multiple users to access a single account. For this reason, Hootsuite may be a better option for some libraries. In addition, you can bulk upload multiple updates. Klout: http://www.klout.com Klout is a social ranking service that recently changed its formula. While Klout is by no means accurate or scientific, it is helpful for identifying possible influencers. Klout also offers a Firefox plugin that will allow you to easily see others’ scores while you are logged into Twitter. Download the plugin here: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/klout/. @Unfollowr: http://unfollower.name/ This service will notify you of everyone who’s unfollowed you on twitter. Muuter: http://muuter.com/ This service allows you to temporarily mute another account. It is particularly useful for people tweeting from conferences or live events and a good way to keep your feed clean.
  • 51. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 51 Video Youtube: http://www.youtube.com YouTube is a video sharing service that is now owned by Google. We recommend that libraries creates an official YouTube channel, and that it uploads video from all live events to the page. In turn, these videos can be posted on the your website. YouTube Insights: http://www.youtube.com/t/advertising_insight This service lets you see detailed statistics about your YouTube video audience. Vimeo: http://www.vimeo.com As an alternative, libraries may consider Vimeo to share videos. Vimeo is a service for artists, educators and nonprofits. A special Vimeo page can be established (much like a YouTube channel) and videos can be embedded on your website. Livestream: http://www.livestream.com Livestream offers numerous live streaming options. Libraries can livestream events using video, and it can also work with Twitter to stream video chats. Livestream offers mobile and website options and a large suite of production tools. For nonprofit availability, see: http://www.livestream.com/platform/ streamingvideosolutions/organizations. Photo Flickr: http://www.flickr.com Flickr is a photo sharing social network now owned by Yahoo. We recommend that libraries have an official Flickr page, where photos from events can be posted and shared. Presentations, Reports SlideShare: http://www.SlideShare.com and Scribd: http://www.scribd.com Both SlideShare and Scribd can be used to share presentations, reports, flyers, brochures, posters and the like, though SlideShare is traditionally used to share presentations. Content can be uploaded to the system for others to see, and each service can be used to help libraries embed that content on its websites.
  • 52. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 52 Blog We recommend that libraries maintain either blogs or Tumblrs embedded on to their sites (see below). Any blog content must be immediately discoverable from the home page, and it must be updated regularly with events news, press releases, evergreen content and more. Tumblr: http://www.tumblr.com Tumblr is a short-form blogging system that’s easy to use and wildly popular. Tumblelogs can be embedded on library websites. Tumblr posts could replace the current library blogs. Metrics Tweetreach: http://tweetreach.com/ Tweetreach is a tool that allows you to see how many people clicked on and were exposed to a URL, name, phrase or hashtag that you posted. You can export the results of your searches into reports. Google Analytics: http://www.google.com/analytics/ This should be used on a library’s website and checked throughout the day by the public relations staff. Learn about who is linking to your site, who’s visiting the site, and do analysis to help you drive more traffic to library site content. There are a number of other social media metrics tools to help you discover trending topics, influencers and the like. Popular options include http:// www.socialflow.com and http://crowdbooster.com.
  • 53. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 53 Creating Meaningful Social Media Content The right content can be seen by tens of thousands of people and can make a lasting positive impact on any library community. The wrong content might never be seen by many people, or it could cause unintentional harm to a library brand. Below are the types of content that libraries publish to their social networks, along with explanations for each.......... Category Explanation Critical information • Changes to library hours • Event cancellations • Emergencies Community information • Reminders about civic events • Holiday and festival information • Courtesy announcements about voting, etc. • Cross-promotional local announcements • Special community events Event promotion • Main library events • Regional library events • Branch library events Event coverage • Coverage before the event (backstage photos, retweets) • Live tweeting and coverage during the event (photos, coverage, retweets) • Coverage after the event (photos, wrap-up announcements, retweets) New acquisitions • Information on new books and collections • Curated acquisitions • E-books and other electronic acquisitions New website content • Blog posts (include URL) • New databases (explain how to access) • New information posted (include URL).......................................................................................... ......................................................................
  • 54. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 54 Creating Compelling Blog Content A blog gets updated regularly, typically by an individual, with posts structured in reverse-chronological order, with the most recent content at the top of the page. True, blogs were originally used by people to easily share the details of their daily lives with others. But over time, blogs evolved into a unique style of web publishing, aided by the fact that blogging software made web publishing accessible to a larger segment of the population by obviating the need for HTML and coding knowledge to publish content online. Contrary to what some people say, Twitter, Facebook and the newest social networks haven't killed blogs.  In fact, more and more people are relying on blogs for daily news and information. Below are several tips to help libraries improve blog presence. • Create your own 12-month editorial calendar.  What events will you cover? • On that calendar, keep track of what topics and kinds of posts your publishing. Work hard not to repeat yourself. • What’s your action plan for your readers? • What are your benchmarks for success?  10,000 daily readers?  20 comments per blog post?  Establish a beginning set of benchmarks, and then decide where you want your blog to go in the next 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. What will it take to get your blog there? • If you don’t have something compelling to say, don’t blog.  It’s okay to skip a day or two.  And don’t just post a handful of your tweets or a link to someone else’s blog simply because you feel like you must have something fresh on your site. • Develop different templates for blog posts.  They might be interviews, lists, charts/ graphs, short breaking-news stories or longer features.  Make sure to use each of your templates rather than posting the same kind of story over and over. • If your topic is less newsy, you still need to incorporate recent events into your posts to capture a digital audience.  You can use Twitter’s trending topics or Google Trends for ideas. • Ask for feedback within your posts.  Give your audience a reason to communicate with you. • People love infographics..........
  • 55. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 55 Scheduling Social Content Once you have determined what content to post, it is important to create a practical social content calendar. Outline which accounts will be used, what actions need to be taken, and who is in charge of producing and publishing that content. Key Dates Action Content Owner Time Day Date What is the action you need to take? Eg. Tweet/email/ blog post Draft the content you need to create Who is responsible? Time Day Date Tweet Book Project announcement Join us for a Book Project reading on Tuesday at the main library. Ruth Time Day Date Post photos of Book Project to Facebook Book Project winning poster design David Time Day Date Post Book Project author interview to YouTube Interview of Book Project author and short reading Sherry Time Day Date Tweet YouTube interview Take a look at Book Project Author reading from our official book... Ruth Time Day Date Email newsletter with multimedia press release Email Ruth
  • 56. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 56 Measuring Success and Return on Investment There are many ways a library can measure its success and return on investment in the social space. It is important to note that the number of Facebook and Twitter followers alone is not indicative of effective social communication. Instead, engagement should be monitored. Library accounts should be monitored throughout the day, every day. Summary reports can be issued at the end of each business week, however metrics tracking should be part of your daily workflow........... CPL Audience Base Metrics To Track Assessment Twitter • # of retweets • # of @replies • # of attempted direct messages • # of name mentions (someone using your handle or name in a tweet without referencing your Twitter username) • # of new followers • # of active followers • # of unfollowers • # of people using a hashtag that you’ve started • What categories of posts are the most popular? • What kinds of content are the most popular? • What time of day produces the most clickthrus and responses? • Who is mentioning and retweeting you? Are they library influencers? • After what kind of post do you see an increase in new followers? • After what kind of post do you typically see a decrease in new followers? • Is the number of posts per day adequate? Should you increase or decrease your post count? • Where are your tweets traveling to? • Does the library have any dissatisfied Customers? • Who is using/ mentioning library content or name without attribution or approval? • Which local departments are helping to amplify your message? Which city departments are clearly not helping ........... ........... ...........
  • 57. 57 Writing a Library Social Media Policy Your staff should be encouraged to experiment with and to use social media, as these networks have proved an indispensable part of our modern information landscape. But it is vitally important that your organization understands the risks associated with posting to networks and your official viewpoints on posting and reacting on social networks. Why Write a Policy? • Standardization: Sets the standard for consistent tone, voice and frequency of posts. • Motivation: Armed with a playbook and guidelines, staff will be more motivated to post regularly. • Clarification: What’s funny to you may not be funny to someone else. Some comments could help your brand, while others could kill it. A policy helps your staff to understand very clearly what’s ok to post and what isn’t. Case Study: Honda Honda decided to launch its Crosstour product using Facebook. In this case, they knew that they could target the right audience and create buzz. But it turned out that the product looked nothing on Facebook like it did in the leaked photos. There was a sudden onslaught of Facebook backlash. Soon, all of the industry publications and blogs started posting about the botched launch. And then mainstream news organizations turned the Crosstour into a lesson on how not to use social networks. Honda went into crisis mode. Tens of thousands of negative, biting comments were left on Honda’s Facebook Wall. So some employees logged in to their personal accounts and seeded the network with positive comments but didn’t identify themselves as Honda staff. When people found out, Honda then decided to pull the page, which only caused automotive blogs, industry publications and finally mainstream media to write stories not about the Crosstour, but about how Honda had misused Facebook and was now suffering as a result. Without a social media policy in place, Honda went into a PR tailspin, and the launch was ruined. Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com
  • 58. 58 Social Media Policy: Checklist Your social media policy should include the following items on this checklist. (They are all explained in detail on the next page.) Introduction Personal accounts explanation How to identify oneself in a private social media account References to your organization Expressing opinion Account management Official accounts explanation Establishing new accounts Creating account names Voice RTs and posts Following/ Followers Frequency Dialogue Customer service Monitoring Critical account information Consistency Final Statement Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com
  • 59. 59 Policy: Explanations and Writing Guidelines 1. Introduction • Why do you have a policy? • Who does the policy cover? • What is your justification for the policy? 2. Personal Accounts • What is your expectation of your employees’ behavior on their own accounts? • Can your staff post or talk about your organization from their personal accounts? • Can your staff post disparaging information about your organization from their personal accounts? NOTE: Be very clear about your POV on personal accounts: “While you may use personal social media accounts, please remember that your actions reflect on who you are as an individual. As a staff member of Home Depot, what you post publicly on your social networks ultimately reflects who we are as an organization.” a. How to identify oneself in a bio: • Social media manager for Home Depot. Tweets are my own. -- is better than -- • Social media manager for big home improvement store. b. Organization references • Is it okay to post from a personal account on behalf of the organization? What are the clear boundaries and expectations? c. Opinion • It’s okay to tell staff they’re free to use personal accounts to express thoughts, ideas and opinions...but your expectation as their employer is that it should be in accordance with your HR policy. d. Account management • If staff plan to post on behalf of your organization, that should come from an official account -- not from their personal account. • NYTimes story about a former employee being sued for his Twitter followers: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/26/technology/lawsuit-may- determine-who-owns-a-twitter-account.html?_r=2 Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com
  • 60. 60 3. Official Accounts • What is your expectation of your employees’ behavior on official accounts? • Can your staff post or talk about your organization without any oversight or direction? Will there be an editorial workflow? • Can your staff post disparaging -- or positive, as was the case with Honda -- information about your organization from official accounts? a. Establishing new accounts • Accounts should be approved first by management. b. Creating account names • A common, standardized name should be used • What kind of name works best? Must be consistent across networks (the same if possible)... c. Voice • What will be the tone and voice of the organization? • How do you define humor? • Profanity? • Groupon has a 12-page document explaining in great detail what its voice is. Abbreviated version here: https://docs.google.com/View? id=dmv9rbh_5ktbq2sxf d. RTs and posts • What content can be retweeted/ reposted? • If you change a post, use an MT... • Define plagiarism! • Offer attribution! • Do you have any off-limits accounts? Example: Do not retweet anything from @kimkardashian Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com
  • 61. 61 e. Following/ Followers • Any accounts followed by your organization are part of your public profile. What are your standards? • Will you set a ratio of followers::followed? • What about following accounts that are political, satirical, highly- opinionated or otherwise controversial? f. Frequency • How often will you post, and why? • What number of posts makes sense for your audience? What about on holidays/ weekends? g. Dialogue • What happens if a community member becomes irate? What is your action plan? • What are the proper steps to take? • How much time should elapse between the disparaging comment and your response? h. Customer Service • If you are using separate social accounts for social media specifically for Customer service, how will they be handled? • If you get a question or post related to Customer service or brand satisfaction, how will you respond? i. Monitoring • Who is in charge of monitoring your networks? • When should they be monitored? • Who will generate a regular report about impact/ influencers, and who will receive it? • Also monitor for unusual activity -- has someone hijacked your name? Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com
  • 62. 62 j. Critical account information • Make a note of any login names and passwords. • Keep a detailed, updated list of any third-party tools used with official accounts. Track those login names and passwords, too. No one person should own this information. It should be filed to managers. Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com NAME OF SERVICE USER NAME PASSWORD WHO CREATED THIS ACCOUNT Twitter @MyLibrary hex8#owhjf Bob Facebook MyLibrary aeoufhe11 Marie Google+ MyLibrary Feed e89cExke2 Julio Instagram MyLibrary dowww3 Sarah Evernote MyLibrary1 Ghsuew111 Marie Gowalla MyLibrary 938dsjW Marie Foursquare MyLibrary 9387JHF Bob Skype MyLibrary_Skype HVB120934s Marie Instant Message MyLibrary aeouce2e Bob Spotify MyLibrary_Music 9384Hvcne Julio TweetDeck MyLibrary 8464GHsve Bob Hootsuite MyLibrary 381kcxht55 Julio Buffer MyLibrary ghdjk773 Bob Banjo MyLibrary NVBW990 Julio Sonar MyLibrary deiVV87 Julio
  • 63. 63 k. Consistency • Make sure that social accounts look, feel and sound consistent. • The same colors, fonts and logo should be used across all networks. l. Final Statement • You can’t define “common sense,” so explain it in several ways. • Try to include language that absolves your organization of any legal action. Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com STYLESHEET ITEM DESCRIPTION Logo hbo_logo_sm.jpg Bio It's HBO. (Posts are US-focused.) http:// www.hbo.com Text Color #FFFFFF Background Color #CECECE Hyperlink Color #333333 Approved Fonts Helvetica, Museo Sans
  • 64. 64 Next Steps Once you’ve completed your social media policy, make sure to review it with staff. We also recommend having a legal professional review your policy to ensure that it can be defended -- and protect your library -- should the need arise. You will probably also need to have your policy vetted and approved by your local city/ county officials. Social media policies can range from a few very descriptive paragraphs to a few pages. It’s very important that once you’ve completed your social media policy that you review it with each of your employees. Offer a seminar that goes through the policy step-by-step so that everyone has had the opportunity to review your policy and to ask questions they may have. Do not create a social media policy, distribute it to your staff and expect that everyone will read -- and follow -- your new guidelines. For additional inspiration and reference, take a look at this online database of social media policies. Search for those that mirror your own organization: http:// socialmediagovernance.com/policies.php. Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com
  • 65. 65 Updated Feb. 2012 Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com About This Report This report was part of a project Webbmedia Group worked on for the Chicago Public Library. The Chicago Public Library was eager to evolve many aspects of a traditional library system for the changing digital media landscape. Key staff from the Chicago Public Library involved in our collaborative process included: Mary Dempsey Commissioner, Chicago Public Library Amy Eshleman Assistant Commissioner, Chicago Public Library Kathy Biel Deputy Commissioner, Chicago Public Library About CPL Since first opening its doors to the public in 1873, the Chicago Public Library has maintained its status of one of the City’s most democratic of institutions — providing all Chicagoans with a free and open place to gather, learn, connect, read and be transformed. The more than 70 locations of the Chicago Public Library are at the forefront of providing innovative library services, technologies and tools Chicagoans need to achieve their personal goals and to establish the City’s role as a competitive force in the global marketplace. Since 1989, the City of Chicago and the Chicago Public Library have opened 59 new or renovated neighborhood libraries — unprecedented public library growth. These new libraries are that special third place — beyond home and work — where people come to improve their lives, nourish their intellect or simply to be entertained. The library is where people of all ages and backgrounds gather freely. Through its rich and current book collections, state of the art technology and cultural and public partnerships, the Chicago Public Library is a thriving, engaged leader in Chicago’s diverse neighborhoods. Although the Chicago Public Library has changed dramatically since its beginnings in an abandoned water tower after the Great Chicago Fire, its mission has remained constant: “We welcome and support all people in their enjoyment of reading and lifelong learning. Working together, we strive to provide equal access to information, ideas and knowledge through books, programs and other resources. We believe in the freedom to read, to learn, to discover.”
  • 66. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 66 AMY WEBB CEO Webbmedia Group Amy is an author, speaker and future thinker, adapting current and emerging technologies for use in communications. She has spent close to 20 years working with digital media, founding several web-based companies and now advising various startups, retailers, government agencies and media organizations as well as Webbmedia's clients all over the world. Amy began her career as a reporter/ writer with Newsweek (Tokyo) and the Wall Street Journal (Hong Kong) where she covered emerging technology, media and cultural trends. She has contributed to the New York Times, NPR, Economist and many publications and broadcast shows. Her work has been recognized with awards/nominations from Webby, Editor & Publisher, Investigative Reporters & Editors, Society of Professional Journalists, W3 and IAVA. She has a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and holds a B.A. in political economics from Indiana University in Bloomington, IN. She also earned Nikyu Certification in the Japanese government-administered Language Proficiency Test and speaks fluently. Amy is a Research Affiliate at the MIT Media Lab and a Lecturer at the Columbia University Sulzberger Leadership Program. She serves on the Board of Directors for the Online News Association, the SXSW Accelerator Advisory Board, Knight-Batten Advisory Board, the Advisory Board for Temple University’s Journalism Program and the Advisory Board for the International Center for Journalists. She is the Dean of the Awesome Foundation Baltimore and one of the Knight News Challenge judges. Amy is also a member of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (Interactive Media Peer Group) and serves as a judge for the Emmy® awards. Her book, Data: A Love Story, will be published by Penguin Valentine’s Day 2013. She has been on the adjunct journalism faculty at University of Maryland, Temple University, Tokyo University and University of the Arts. About the Authors
  • 67. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 67 Bonnie Shaw is digital native, and an expert at making meaningful connection between people, place and technology.  Bonnie has over nine years of international professional experience in design, strategy, and project management in local grounded and global online projects. In 2006 she was a founder of the global photographic treasure hunt and community engagement game: Snap-Shot-City.com – a groundbreaking integrated technology event played around the world. She also recently helped the Queensland State Library (Australia) create best practices for developing libraries as community hubs and idea stores. Bonnie has degrees in Landscape Architecture, Planning and Design, and a Masters in Urban Design. She started her career designing cities and building civic engagement in disadvantaged communities in Australia and around the UK. She is passionate about serious play, and strives to inject lively creative collaboration processes to drive rigorous and implementable results.  Bonnie regularly blogs at the intersection of people, place and technology at BonnieInbetween.com, she was a guest researcher at MIT’s Senseable Cities Lab in 2008, and regularly presents on technology and online/offline community engagement, serious gaming, and digital storytelling at conferences around the world. Bonnie is currently acting as a delegate for the Intelligent Cities Project for the National Building Museum and the Dean of the DC chapter of The Awesome Foundation, a micro-philanthropy organization promoting awesomeness in the universe. BONNIE SHAW ENGAGEMENT SPECIALIST Webbmedia Group/ iStrategy Labs
  • 68. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 68 Yasmin specializes in creative public policy making and how technology can be used to make government and organizations more collaborative, participatory, transparent, and accountable. Yasmin received a Masters in Public Policy from the Harvard Kennedy School, where she focused her studies on Democracy, Politics, and Institutions. Prior to graduate school, Yasmin was the Information Officer for the Office of the Arts and Special Projects at the NYC Department of Education. She has served on the Student Digital Advisory Board for the Shorenstein Center for Press, Politics, and Public Policy, the Program Committee for O’Reilly’s Gov 2.0 Expo, and regularly blogs at wethegoverati.wordpress.com. Yasmin received her bachelor’s degree in Government from Cornell University. While at the Kennedy School she co-founded the Government 2.0 Professional Interest Council, which works to encourage the integration of Government 2.0 principles into the curricula and events at the Kennedy School and wrote her masters thesis on how U.S. Federal Agencies can Use Social Media to Increase Civic Participation. Along with her colleagues at Mass.gov, MIT, and O’Reilly, she co-hosted the first annual New England Government 2.0 Camp, and is looking forward to participating in the next one. YASMIN FODIL STRATEGY SPECIALIST Webbmedia Group/ BYO
  • 69. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com Updated Feb. 2012 69 Lance is an accomplished information technology manager with more than 10 years of demonstrated success in library information technology. He previously served as the Director of Information Technology for the Multnomah County Library in Portland, Oregon and has consulted nationwide on technology in libraries. He has deep insights into the various digital systems being used by libraries and has advised many on the technology, systems and workflows they use. Lance is also active in promoting civic involvement through digital engagement and in bridging the digital divide in underserved communities. He has been involved in multiple broadband adoption programs and has managed projects to use innovative digital search tools to help untangle benefits for veterans and to promote the entrepreneurial use of technology among small businesses and non-profits in underserved communities. Lance studied Computer Science at the University of Georgia, Management Accounting at Portland State University, and has a BA in Russian language and literature from Grinnell College. He studied at Leningrad State University in St. Petersburg and has worked in Russia, Ukraine and Central Asia in both community information and technology capacities. Lance is based in Boston, MA. LANCE MURTY DIGITAL INFORMATION SPECIALIST Webbmedia Group
  • 70. 70 About Webbmedia Group Webbmedia Group, LLC is an international digital strategy consultancy that advises Fortune 500 and Global 1000 companies, media organizations, law firms, foundations, associations, governments, startups and universities worldwide. We study disruptive technologies and track the emerging digital trends that will prove most game-changing in the near and mid-future. We advise our clients on how to take best advantage of what's next, giving them critical insights and points of view to push them far ahead of their competition. The company is directed by Amy Webb, CEO. Webbmedia Group includes specialists and experts in technology trends, mobile, tablets, technology/ law, gaming, social media, SEO/metrics, digital media business development, product development and digital media training. Headquartered in Baltimore, Webbmedia Group has team members in more than a dozen cities, including Miami, NYC and Kyiv (Ukraine). We also partner with BYO Consulting and iStrategy, community engagement firms that specialize in gaming and high-profile participatory events. Our virtualized office and distributed platform allows Webbmedia Group to draw on a wide variety of disciplines to serve our worldwide client base. Members of our staff are fluent in Spanish, Russian, Japanese, French and English. Updated Feb. 2012 Contact Us Site: http://www.webbmediagroup.com Tel: (267) 342.4300 Email: info@webbmediagroup.com Twitter: @webbmediagroup Key Company Info • Webbmedia Group launched January 2006. • We’ve worked with Fortune 500 and Global 1000 companies, foundations, media organizations, governments, universities and tech startups worldwide. • We offer strategy and training services. • Webbmedia Group staff are fluent in Japanese, Russian, Ukrainian, Spanish, French and English. • All of our research, client work and training is personalized for each individual group. Key Performance Indicators: Library Toolkit © 2012 Webbmedia Group, LLC http://www.webbmediagroup.com

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