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The Creative Apprenticeships event looked at how arts and cultural organisations can capture and nuture a new generation of talented individuals through apprenticeships....

The Creative Apprenticeships event looked at how arts and cultural organisations can capture and nuture a new generation of talented individuals through apprenticeships.

This is the keynote presentation from the event by Pauline Tambling, Joint CEO, Creative and Cultural Skills and Managing Director, National Skill Academy for Creative and Cultural

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Creative Apprenticeships presentation - Pauline Tambling Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Pauline Tambling Joint CEO, Creative & Cultural SkillsManaging Director, National Skills Academy for Creative & Cultural
  • 2. Apprenticeships - the challenge for our sector
  • 3. Apprenticeships - the challenge for our sector • Why apprenticeships? • Why now? • Do apprenticeships work in our sector? • Why is it all so complicated? • Why can’t people give me a straight answer about funding apprenticeships? 3
  • 4. Sector Skills Councils• Work with employers, education and Government to make sure that their sectors can recruit people with the right skills for the job market.• Produce Labour Market Intelligence, support qualifications development and engage with employers.• Funded and licensed by the UK Commission for Employment and Skills (UKCES) and working closely with the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) and the Skills Funding Agency.
  • 5. Creative & Cultural Skills • Our sectors are craft, cultural heritage, design, literature, music, performing arts and visual arts. • Our goal is to enable the creative and cultural industries to reach their economic potential through relevant skills and training. • We work in England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales. • We run a Careers Programme, Industry Partnerships, Education Partnerships, Research.
  • 6. Definitions ‘a system of training a new generation of practitioners of a skill. Most training is done while working for an employer who helps the apprentice learn their trade in exchange for their continuing labour for an agreed period of time after they become skilled. Theoretical education may also be involved either in the workplace or through attending a college whilst being paid by the employer’.
  • 7. Employers employApprentices work Colleges train
  • 8. ‘Approved’ Apprenticeships• Underpinning qualifications• Functional skills• Employment rights and responsibilities• Personal Learning and Thinking SkillsTraining funded by government 8
  • 9. Current Government Policy ‘The Government has urged employers to help create 100,000 more apprentices by the year 2014. Business Secretary Vince Cable marked the start of Apprenticeship Week by underlining the Government’s commitment to increase the budget for apprenticeships to over £1,400m in 2011-12. He urged employers to follow the lead of firms such as British Airways, British Gas, BT, Superdrug, Jaguar Land Rover and Procter & Gamble, which are offering thousands of places to budding apprentices……’ 9
  • 10. Jobs in the creative industries...
  • 11. Apprenticeships for our sector?• Over-supply of performers and artists but skills shortages in other parts of the industry• Workforce profile• Culture of ‘over-qualified/under-skilled’ recruits• Not all jobs are graduate jobs• Creative Apprenticeships new to Further and Higher Education 11
  • 12. The Creative Industries• 66,900 businesses, 85% of which employ fewer than 5 people.• Highly qualified: 54% of workers educated to level 4 or above.• Far more qualified than the UK economy as a whole, where only 34% are educated to this level.• The average worker earns £8.60 an hour, compared with the total economy, where the average hourly wage is £8.69.
  • 13. The creative and cultural sector in England - 694,700 workers Qualifications level: No qualifications: 5% in the creative and cultural sector (8% in the UK economy as a whole) L1: 3% (5%) L2: 14% (25%) L3: 18% (20%) L4 or above: 54% (33%)
  • 14. Research and analysis www.creative-blueprint.co.uk
  • 15. Creative ApprenticeshipsCreative & Cultural Skills has developed new apprenticeships with creative andcultural sector employers in the following areas at both level 2 and level 3:• Live Events & Promotion• Music Business• Technical Theatre• Costume & Wardrobe• Cultural Heritage• Community Arts• Design• Jewellery, Silversmithing & Allied Trades
  • 16. Other Apprenticeships • Business & Administration • Facilities Manager • Web Designer • Customer Services • Sales & Telesales • Software Developer • Accounts • Marketing • Set crafts • Electrician For a full list, see www.apprenticeships.org.uk
  • 17. Number of Creative Apprentices in the creative sector1000 923800600 582 466400 236200 135 58 0 0-200 Number of Creative Apprentices Poly. (Number of Creative Apprentices)
  • 18. The basics • The Apprenticeship National Minimum Wage is £2.60 p/h • Apprentices must be employed for the length of time it takes to complete all the qualifications on the framework • Apprentices can move onto the next level apprenticeship • Apprenticeships are jobs - and linked to any available framework
  • 19. Some Apprenticeship Myths • Apprenticeships are expensive • Apprenticeships are only for large businesses • I’d have to allocate so much money to train an apprentice • I’d be better off with a graduate intern • I’d have to get all my staff CRB checked • All my jobs are graduate jobs • An apprentice would be too immature for the workplace • The whole process is bureaucracy-heavy
  • 20. Challenges (1)There are 21,620 creative businesses in London• 88% employer fewer than 5 people.• 93% employer fewer than 50 peopleThe sector is dependent on freelancersVisual Arts (81%), Literary Arts (65%), Music (59%), Performing Arts (56%), Craft(53%), Design (48%) and Cultural Heritage (6%).
  • 21. Challenges (2)• No history of non-graduate recruitment• No profile for technical and ‘non- arts’ jobs• No traditional relationship with the Further Education sector• No approved Creative Apprenticeship Frameworks until March 2008• Limited number of frameworks• London has low take up of Apprenticeships
  • 22. Current Government Policy ‘THE Government has urged employers to help create 100,000 more apprentices by the year 2014.Business Secretary Vince Cable marked the start of Apprenticeship Week by underlining the Government’s commitment to increase the budget for apprenticeships to over £1,400m in 2011-12.He urged employers to follow the lead of firms such as British Airways, British Gas, BT, Superdrug, Jaguar Land Rover and Procter & Gamble, which are offering thousands of places to budding apprentices……’ 22
  • 23. National Skills AcademyFounder College Network 23
  • 24. Why it can seem complicated • Different timescales (1-4 years) • Intermediate/Advanced and Higher levels • Skills Funding Agency support for training is linked to age (100% for 16- 19 years ; 50% for 19 – 24 years ; no training funding for 24years +) • Different frameworks, different funding levels • Existing staff can be apprentices and claim the training funding
  • 25. Group Training Associations • Clusters of employers working together • Delivering training in-house • Can share apprentices • Can access training funding • Colleges take the role of assessors and contract holders
  • 26. Sector Skills Councils• Develop and approve National Occupational Standards (NOS)• Operate as an ‘Issuing Authority’ for apprenticeships• Develop and issue apprenticeship frameworks• Ensure apprenticeships are relevant and fit for purpose• ‘Quality assure’ apprenticeship frameworks.
  • 27. Industry-endorsed careers advice and guidance www.getintotheatre.org
  • 28. Supporting progression in the sector www.creative-choices.co.uk
  • 29. Apprenticeship Statistics • The latest cohort of 200 apprentices is expected to deliver a net gain of c£2.4m to the UK economy. • 79% of employers feel that apprentices make a significant contribution to their business. • 78% felt that Creative Apprentices were more effective in the workplace as a result of their training. • Nearly 6 in 10 apprentices remain with their employer post-completion.
  • 30. Further Information pauline.tambling@ccskills.org.uk www.twitter.com/NSACreative www.nsa-ccskills.co.uk www.ccskills.org.uk