YOU Need to TeachEconomics to Your Students Janet Mulder: 52nd Congressional District Coordinator Project Citizen & We the...
Objectives   Teachers will use a problem solving    approach to create more student    interest in the study of economics...
Objectives   Students will experience real life    situations of their choosing, applying    economic principles, thus ac...
Objectives   Students will become engaged in    and learn the process of problem    solving which they will use for the  ...
What is Project Citizen?   Education for democratic citizenship   Teaches students to monitor and influence    public po...
Why Use Project Citizen?Project Citizen develops in students acommitment to active citizenship andgovernance.    Provides...
What Does the Project CitizenInstructional Program Achieve?The instructional program helps students to:   Learn how to mo...
What is Public Policy? Public policy can be defined as the agreed upon ways that government fulfills its responsibilities ...
What is Public Policy? Public policies are contained in laws, rules, regulations, decisions, and practices created by    ...
What Criteria is Used to Select anIssue or Problem?1.   Does government have the responsibility and     authority to act o...
Infusing Economics IntoProject Citizen   As a class project, students work together to    identify and study a problem in...
Portfolio and DocumentationBinder               alternative policies                                       our class polic...
Portfolio and DocumentationBinder   Explanation of the    problem   Evaluation of    alternative policies   Presentatio...
Project Citizen- Step I Identifying public policy problems in communities                                         14
Identifying Public Policy Problems               Students identify public               policy problems in their          ...
Project Citizen - Step IISelecting a         Problems in                   our communityproblem for    1. Drugs      3.cla...
Selecting a Problem for ClassStudy   Students present and discuss the    problems they have identified and then    select...
Project Citizen - Step III                  Gathering information                  on the problem                         ...
Gathering Information on theProblem Selected                          Students gather information                        ...
Project Citizen - Step IVDeveloping                                  Action                                            Pla...
Developing a Class Portfolio   Group 1 - Develops an explanation of the              problem   Group 2 - Evaluates alter...
What are the InstructionalAdvantages of Project Citizen?   Students connect with real world    problems and events.   St...
What are the InstructionalAdvantages of ProjectCitizen?   Students cooperate with peers in group    settings   Students ...
Project Citizen - Step VPresenting theportfolio                           24
Presenting the Portfolio Public hearing before a panel of  evaluators chosen from the  community Presentations by each o...
What are the Assessment Advantagesof the Simulated Hearing?    Students connect with real world problems     and events. ...
What are the Assessment Advantagesof the Simulated Hearing?   Students cooperate with peers in group    settings   Stude...
Step VI - Reflecting on theLearning ExperienceAcquiring Civic Knowledge   Exercising the rights      Learning the purpos...
Step VI - ReflectingDeveloping Civic Skills    Intellectual skills     •   identify     •   describe     •   explain     ...
Step VI - ReflectingDeveloping Civic Skills   Participatory skills    •   capacity to influence policies and decisions   ...
Step VI - ReflectingExperiencing Underlying Values andPrinciples   Principles       Popular sovereignty       Constitut...
Step VI - ReflectingFostering traits of character   Individual responsibility   Self discipline/self-governance   Civil...
Step VI - ReflectingFostering traits of character   Open mindedness   Critical mindedness   Negotiation and compromise...
Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking Trade-offs   must be made   Because  the use of scarce    resources is costly, tr...
Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking People try to get the most from their limited resources  People  should choose th...
Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking   Decisions are made at the margin.     When making a choice people focus on     ...
Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking   Acquiring information is costly.     Information helps people make better      ...
Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking Economic  actions often have indirect as well as direct or secondary effects that ...
Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking Incentives   matter   Asbenefits to making one decision   increase, people will b...
Key Findings   Students believe they can make a difference in    their communities.   Students do make a difference in t...
Key Findings   Students develop a commitment to active    citizenship.   Students become involved in their communities....
For more information contact  Janet Mulder            Anthony Zambelli3394 Beaver Hollow Road    900 Rancho San Diego Pky ...
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Ccss economics pc presentation 03-03-2012

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Ccss economics pc presentation 03-03-2012

  1. 1. YOU Need to TeachEconomics to Your Students Janet Mulder: 52nd Congressional District Coordinator Project Citizen & We the People Anthony Zambelli: 51st Congressional District Coordinator Project Citizen & WTP San Diego Center for Economic Education at Cuyamaca College 1
  2. 2. Objectives Teachers will use a problem solving approach to create more student interest in the study of economics and how it affects our country.
  3. 3. Objectives Students will experience real life situations of their choosing, applying economic principles, thus acquiring the skills necessary to become effective citizens.
  4. 4. Objectives Students will become engaged in and learn the process of problem solving which they will use for the rest of their lives!
  5. 5. What is Project Citizen? Education for democratic citizenship Teaches students to monitor and influence public policy Interdisciplinary instructional program for adolescents • Focuses on state and local government • Applies learning to real world issues • Uses cooperative learning • Serves as a model performance assessment 5
  6. 6. Why Use Project Citizen?Project Citizen develops in students acommitment to active citizenship andgovernance.  Provides the knowledge and skills required for effective citizenship.  Provides practical experience designed to foster a sense of competence and efficacy.  Develops an understanding of the importance of citizen participation.  Develops an economic way of thinking. 6
  7. 7. What Does the Project CitizenInstructional Program Achieve?The instructional program helps students to: Learn how to monitor and influence public policy. Learn policy making processes and their economics consequences. Develop concrete skills and the foundation needed to become responsible participating citizens. Develop effective, creative communication skills. Develop more positive self-images and confidence in exercising their rights and responsibilities. 7
  8. 8. What is Public Policy? Public policy can be defined as the agreed upon ways that government fulfills its responsibilities to protect the rights of individuals and to promote the general welfare by solving problems. 8
  9. 9. What is Public Policy? Public policies are contained in laws, rules, regulations, decisions, and practices created by  executive, legislative, and judicial branches  government bureaucracies  regulatory agencies  other public decision-making bodies 9
  10. 10. What Criteria is Used to Select anIssue or Problem?1. Does government have the responsibility and authority to act on this issue/problem?2. Can positive or negative economic consequences be identified?3. Is it reasonable to believe that a policy can or should be written that will resolve the issue/problem?4. Is the issue/problem important to young people? Does it have a direct or indirect impact on them?5. Will the class be able to find enough information to tackle the problem? 10
  11. 11. Infusing Economics IntoProject Citizen As a class project, students work together to identify and study a problem in their community. They propose a solution in the form of a public policy recommendation. They develop an action plan for getting their policy proposal adopted and implemented. Students display their work in a portfolio and documentation binder and present it in a simulated public hearing. 11
  12. 12. Portfolio and DocumentationBinder alternative policies our class policy the problem our action plan documentation section 12
  13. 13. Portfolio and DocumentationBinder Explanation of the problem Evaluation of alternative policies Presentation of proposed policy Presentation of an action plan Presentation of economic principles on each panel 13
  14. 14. Project Citizen- Step I Identifying public policy problems in communities 14
  15. 15. Identifying Public Policy Problems Students identify public policy problems in their communities by:  discussing them with each other  interviewing family members and other adults  reading newspapers and other print sources  listening to news reports on radio and TV 15
  16. 16. Project Citizen - Step IISelecting a Problems in our communityproblem for 1. Drugs 3.class study Pollution 2. Violence 4. 16
  17. 17. Selecting a Problem for ClassStudy Students present and discuss the problems they have identified and then select one problem for their class project. Students identify the economic consequences of the problem. 17
  18. 18. Project Citizen - Step III Gathering information on the problem 18
  19. 19. Gathering Information on theProblem Selected  Students gather information on the chosen public policy problem from a variety of sources Numerical Data Interviews and surveys  Printed sourcesRadio and television  Libraries  Internet Scholars and professors  Lawyers and judgesCommunity organizations and interest groups Legislative offices  Administrative offices 19
  20. 20. Project Citizen - Step IVDeveloping Action Plansa class Our Alternate Policies Problemportfolio Class Policy 20
  21. 21. Developing a Class Portfolio Group 1 - Develops an explanation of the problem Group 2 - Evaluates alternative policies Group 3 - Develops a proposed policy consistent with constitutional principles Group 4 - Develops an action plan 21
  22. 22. What are the InstructionalAdvantages of Project Citizen? Students connect with real world problems and events. Students experience the economic way of thinking. Students use many disciplines. Students relate assessment activities to instructional activities. 22
  23. 23. What are the InstructionalAdvantages of ProjectCitizen? Students cooperate with peers in group settings Students work with clear, attainable goals Students evaluate their own progress through self-assessment Students benefit from the involvement of parents and other community members 23
  24. 24. Project Citizen - Step VPresenting theportfolio 24
  25. 25. Presenting the Portfolio Public hearing before a panel of evaluators chosen from the community Presentations by each of the four groups •Opening oral presentations (4 minutes) •Responses to questions (6 minutes) 25
  26. 26. What are the Assessment Advantagesof the Simulated Hearing?  Students connect with real world problems and events.  Students articulate relevant economic principles.  Students integrate a variety of related ideas and skills.  Students use many disciplines.  Students relate assessment activities to instructional activities. 26
  27. 27. What are the Assessment Advantagesof the Simulated Hearing? Students cooperate with peers in group settings Students work with clear, attainable goals Students evaluate their own progress through self-assessment Students benefit from the involvement of parents and other community members 27
  28. 28. Step VI - Reflecting on theLearning ExperienceAcquiring Civic Knowledge Exercising the rights  Learning the purposes of citizens of democratic government Fulfilling the  Learning the responsibilities of organization & citizens procedures of Learning the government responsibilities of  Learning the role of public officials civil society 28
  29. 29. Step VI - ReflectingDeveloping Civic Skills  Intellectual skills • identify • describe • explain • evaluate a position • take a position • defend a position 29
  30. 30. Step VI - ReflectingDeveloping Civic Skills Participatory skills • capacity to influence policies and decisions by working with others • clearly articulate interests and make them known to key decision and policy makers • building coalitions, negotiating, compromising and seeking consensus • managing conflict 30
  31. 31. Step VI - ReflectingExperiencing Underlying Values andPrinciples Principles  Popular sovereignty  Constitutional government • Rule of law • Separation of powers • Checks and balances • Minority rights • Judicial review 31
  32. 32. Step VI - ReflectingFostering traits of character Individual responsibility Self discipline/self-governance Civility Courage Respect for the rights of other individuals Respect for law Honesty 32
  33. 33. Step VI - ReflectingFostering traits of character Open mindedness Critical mindedness Negotiation and compromise Persistence Civic mindedness Compassion Economic way of thinking 33
  34. 34. Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking Trade-offs must be made  Because the use of scarce resources is costly, trade-offs must be incurred.  When dealing with scarce resources, an opportunity cost will be present.
  35. 35. Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking People try to get the most from their limited resources  People should choose the option that offers the greatest benefit at the least possible cost.
  36. 36. Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking Decisions are made at the margin.  When making a choice people focus on the difference between two alternatives, such as how much more one item cost than another.  This is also referred to as marginal decision making of "thinking at the margin."
  37. 37. Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking Acquiring information is costly.  Information helps people make better decisions and is, therefore, valuable.  Time is scarce, making information costly to gather.  At some point people will decide that additional information is not worth the additional cost of time.
  38. 38. Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking Economic actions often have indirect as well as direct or secondary effects that are only visible with time.  Oneof the most common economic errors is the failure to consider secondary effects.
  39. 39. Developing the Economic Wayof Thinking Incentives matter  Asbenefits to making one decision increase, people will be more likely to choose it. On the other hand, as costs to making one decision increase, people will be less likely to choose it.
  40. 40. Key Findings Students believe they can make a difference in their communities. Students do make a difference in their communities. Students develop greater understanding of public policy. Students develop greater understanding of challenges facing policy makers. Students learn how their government works. 40
  41. 41. Key Findings Students develop a commitment to active citizenship. Students become involved in their communities. Students learn about specific community problems. Students learn to work in groups. Students develop important research and communication skills. Students learn the value of applying the economic way of thinking to public policy issues. 41
  42. 42. For more information contact Janet Mulder Anthony Zambelli3394 Beaver Hollow Road 900 Rancho San Diego Pky Jamul, CA 91935 El Cajon, CA 92019 (619) 588-5672 (619) 660-4318 (619) 318-8923 (619) 261-6129 jmulder02@gmail.com anthony.zambelli@gcccd.edu San Diego Center for Economic Education at Cuyamaca College cceesandiego.org 42
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