From broadcast to networks Creating strategies for change in a changing landscape
Aims <ul><li>Re-cap our vision of the changing landscape and tools for the non-profit sector </li></ul><ul><li>Start to se...
Part 1: Changing landscape & tools
First, let’s take a step back…
Major shift in landscape… <ul><li>“ If the late 19th century was the ‘golden age’ of mutual institutions, clubs and societ...
Caused by emergence of social web <ul><li>Early Internet built  by corporations and Government </li></ul><ul><li>Emerging ...
Leading to organisational shift “ Organisations are increasingly being by-passed and  power is shifting away from top-down...
The changing landscape …and its effect on the sector
Emerging key trends <ul><li>These emerging networks are characterised by two key trends – both social and technological: <...
1. Social capital <ul><li>Social Capital can be defined as “shared values” that promote social cooperation to achieve comm...
This isn’t social capital X
Social media builds social capital <ul><li>Building social capital in social media relies on ‘social’ interaction rather t...
Social media: social, not media <ul><li>“ When social exchanges and market exchanges are mixed up people get uncomfortable...
2. Increasingly self-organised <ul><li>Charities must move from traditional, top-down ‘Join Us’ structures to emerging onl...
New tools offer empowerment <ul><li>&quot;[B]ecause the minimum costs of being an organization in the first place are rela...
Empowering tools
But reality is more subtle…
Organisational hybridity <ul><li>“ New organizational forms are emerging that exist only in hybrid form and could not func...
Hybridity in action?
Part 2 – Adapting to changes
First, let’s recap <ul><li>Networks are increasingly important for communicating and campaigning, especially for non-profi...
The big issue <ul><li>How do we develop strategies for truly aligned networked campaigning? </li></ul>
Part of the answer? <ul><li>Manual Castells </li></ul><ul><li>Sociologist especially associated with information society a...
Castells on networks <ul><li>Castells believes networks can be controlled through two mechanisms: </li></ul><ul><li>Networ...
What this means for campaigners <ul><li>Programming networks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These are organisation-focused networks...
Applying this thinking to strategy <ul><li>What if filter our strategic thinking through Castell’s approach to networks?  ...
Objective setting <ul><li>‘ Programme Objectives ’ should be linked to broader organisational ones and seen as longer-term...
Objective setting (cont’d) <ul><li>Don’t forget… </li></ul><ul><li>Make them SMART </li></ul><ul><li>And  ensure they’re a...
Strategy development
Strategy development
Network research <ul><li>Use freely available tools to start identifying, analysing and understanding key individuals and ...
How?
Network mapping <ul><li>UK Uncut’s network visualised </li></ul>Source:  Market Sentinel
Things to look for <ul><li>Network topography: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nodes  – individual actors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li...
Good old fashioned desktop research We Are Social’s approach to online influencer identification and profiling
Strategy development
Set-up <ul><li>Create a central hub around which your communities of networks can be built </li></ul><ul><li>Open source p...
Social presence set-up <ul><li>Use research insights to guide organisational presence on wider social platforms </li></ul>...
Content planning <ul><li>Timely and engaging content is key to drive both programming and switching networks </li></ul><ul...
Operationalising <ul><li>Both programming and switching networks are made more efficient and safer by creating guidance pr...
Strategy development
Networked movement building <ul><ul><li>The practice of “programming” networks can be best equated with building networked...
Them *again*
OU & Four in Ten
Advocacy campaigns <ul><ul><li>“ Switching” networks can best be understood as networked advocacy achieving short-term goa...
Greenpeace vs Nestle <ul><li>Campaign targets Nestle’s palm oil supply by hijacking iconic brand </li></ul>
Elicits negative comms response
All over in 48 hours (almost)
Generating media coverage
Impacting the share price
Achieving advocacy goals <ul><li>Two months later… </li></ul>
MyDavidCameron
Conservative Party: Make IT Better
Where do we go from here?
The challenge “ Organisations are increasingly being by-passed and  power is shifting away from top-down hierarchies and t...
Next steps <ul><li>Think about your programming and switching objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and map your relevant ...
Help your organisation look like this Network engagement Network management Twitter Slideshare Issuu Flickr YouTube
Questions? for further conversation http://wearesocial.net
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From broadcast to networks

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From broadcast to networks

  1. From broadcast to networks Creating strategies for change in a changing landscape
  2. Aims <ul><li>Re-cap our vision of the changing landscape and tools for the non-profit sector </li></ul><ul><li>Start to set-out our thinking about adapting communication and campaigning strategy to these changes </li></ul>
  3. Part 1: Changing landscape & tools
  4. First, let’s take a step back…
  5. Major shift in landscape… <ul><li>“ If the late 19th century was the ‘golden age’ of mutual institutions, clubs and societies, the early 21st century is a new golden age of networks and online communities” </li></ul>- NCVO Report, ICT Foresight: how online communities can make the internet work for the Voluntary and Community Sector
  6. Caused by emergence of social web <ul><li>Early Internet built by corporations and Government </li></ul><ul><li>Emerging social web being built by networks of individuals </li></ul>
  7. Leading to organisational shift “ Organisations are increasingly being by-passed and power is shifting away from top-down hierarchies and towards more fluid and participative networks ” NCVO Report, ICT Foresight: how online communities can make the internet work for the Voluntary and Community Sector
  8. The changing landscape …and its effect on the sector
  9. Emerging key trends <ul><li>These emerging networks are characterised by two key trends – both social and technological: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Social capital -- > Networks motivated by rewards from social cooperation to achieve shared goals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Self-organisation --> Advocacy networks are being created by self-organised groups </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>These factors are creating a situation that is fundamentally changing the way organisations operate – both in function and form </li></ul>
  10. 1. Social capital <ul><li>Social Capital can be defined as “shared values” that promote social cooperation to achieve common goals </li></ul><ul><li>It’s about creating motivation and reward based on non-financial incentives </li></ul>
  11. This isn’t social capital X
  12. Social media builds social capital <ul><li>Building social capital in social media relies on ‘social’ interaction rather than ‘media’ content: </li></ul><ul><li>“ Content isn’t king. Conversation is king. Content is just something to talk about. </li></ul><ul><li>- Cory Doctorow, BoingBoing.net </li></ul>
  13. Social media: social, not media <ul><li>“ When social exchanges and market exchanges are mixed up people get uncomfortable. And grumpy. And this explains many of the pickles brands get themselves into, particularly with personal media creators like bloggers. Blogging is mostly a social thing, social norms apply ” </li></ul><ul><li>- Russell Davies, PSFK </li></ul>
  14. 2. Increasingly self-organised <ul><li>Charities must move from traditional, top-down ‘Join Us’ structures to emerging online ‘Join Up’ networks </li></ul>
  15. New tools offer empowerment <ul><li>&quot;[B]ecause the minimum costs of being an organization in the first place are relatively high, certain activities may have some value but not enough to make them worth pursuing in any organized way. New social tools are altering this equation by lowering the costs of coordinating group action .&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>— Clay Shirky, Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations </li></ul>
  16. Empowering tools
  17. But reality is more subtle…
  18. Organisational hybridity <ul><li>“ New organizational forms are emerging that exist only in hybrid form and could not function in the ways they do without the Internet. </li></ul><ul><li>These “ hybrid mobilization movements ” blend functions typically associated with political parties, interest groups, and social movements. </li></ul><ul><li>Fast “switches,” between online and offline realms, and within and between campaigns, are emerging characteristics of contemporary … mobilization.” </li></ul>Professor Andrew Chadwick, University of London
  19. Hybridity in action?
  20. Part 2 – Adapting to changes
  21. First, let’s recap <ul><li>Networks are increasingly important for communicating and campaigning, especially for non-profit organisations built on social capital </li></ul><ul><li>But networks also function very differently than traditional top-down approaches </li></ul>
  22. The big issue <ul><li>How do we develop strategies for truly aligned networked campaigning? </li></ul>
  23. Part of the answer? <ul><li>Manual Castells </li></ul><ul><li>Sociologist especially associated with information society and communications research </li></ul>
  24. Castells on networks <ul><li>Castells believes networks can be controlled through two mechanisms: </li></ul><ul><li>Network Programmers have “the ability to constitute network(s), and to program [them] in terms of goals assigned to the network” </li></ul><ul><li>Network Switchers have “the ability to connect and ensure cooperation of different networks by sharing common goals … combining resources [and] setting up strategic cooperation” </li></ul><ul><li>(Castells, 2009: 45-47) </li></ul>
  25. What this means for campaigners <ul><li>Programming networks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These are organisation-focused networks with long-term goals and managed by network (or community) managers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Networked movements built through long-term engagement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Switching networks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>These are existing networks with goals aligned with your organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying these networks and cooperating strategically can achieve shared goals through combining resources </li></ul></ul>
  26. Applying this thinking to strategy <ul><li>What if filter our strategic thinking through Castell’s approach to networks? </li></ul>
  27. Objective setting <ul><li>‘ Programme Objectives ’ should be linked to broader organisational ones and seen as longer-term goals based on building a robust, deeply engaged movement or community </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Switching Objectives’ could be proactively linked to specific short-term objectives (e.g. campaign, communication, fundraising, etc) as well as reactively linked to wider political, media, research agendas etc (i.e. the 38 Degrees approach) </li></ul>
  28. Objective setting (cont’d) <ul><li>Don’t forget… </li></ul><ul><li>Make them SMART </li></ul><ul><li>And ensure they’re achievable via social media! </li></ul>
  29. Strategy development
  30. Strategy development
  31. Network research <ul><li>Use freely available tools to start identifying, analysing and understanding key individuals and communities </li></ul><ul><li>These should be divided into networks that can be: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>used to constitute your own, programmable network (s), e.g. professional, sectoral, supporter, self-organised </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Switched to achieve shared goals, e.g. networks connected to your programmed network(s) periphery </li></ul></ul>
  32. How?
  33. Network mapping <ul><li>UK Uncut’s network visualised </li></ul>Source: Market Sentinel
  34. Things to look for <ul><li>Network topography: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nodes – individual actors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Core – inner cluster/hub of ‘doers’, crucial to active networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hubs – groups of highly active and connected nodes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clusters – groups of actors, not actively connected to wider network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Peripheral nodes/hubs – actors/groups of actors on the edges of your network; crucial to growth as they’re the interface with wider networks </li></ul></ul>
  35. Good old fashioned desktop research We Are Social’s approach to online influencer identification and profiling
  36. Strategy development
  37. Set-up <ul><li>Create a central hub around which your communities of networks can be built </li></ul><ul><li>Open source platforms offer flexible functionality for ongoing community building and engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Can be easily and quickly updated and supports long-form content </li></ul><ul><li>Central to both programming and switching </li></ul>Wordpress Drupal
  38. Social presence set-up <ul><li>Use research insights to guide organisational presence on wider social platforms </li></ul><ul><li>Choosing wisely will enable you to engage and mobilise networks from within their own online communities </li></ul><ul><li>Insight led set-up supports programming and switching </li></ul>
  39. Content planning <ul><li>Timely and engaging content is key to drive both programming and switching networks </li></ul><ul><li>Planning differs in both respects: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Proactively mapping out strategically aligned content and action will support network programming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Flexibility and sensitivity to wider political, news and online agendas is crucial for switching </li></ul></ul>
  40. Operationalising <ul><li>Both programming and switching networks are made more efficient and safer by creating guidance protocols, e.g.: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conversation management guidelines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Editorial guidelines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Moderation policy </li></ul></ul>
  41. Strategy development
  42. Networked movement building <ul><ul><li>The practice of “programming” networks can be best equated with building networked movements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How this takes shape will depend on specific objectives but key activities will include: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Robust, forward-looking content strategy aligned with objectives </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Active participation - i.e. listening to and engaging with – your community </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Adding value through exclusivity or incentivisation </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Recognising you’re part of a wider network of networks </li></ul></ul></ul>
  43. Them *again*
  44. OU & Four in Ten
  45. Advocacy campaigns <ul><ul><li>“ Switching” networks can best be understood as networked advocacy achieving short-term goals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Again, specific tactics will depend on objectives but foundational ‘switching’ activity could include: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Activating programmed networks to switch personal networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Switching ‘overt’ networks, e.g. strategically aligned organisational networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identifying and switching ‘covert’ networks, e.g. self-organised </li></ul></ul>
  46. Greenpeace vs Nestle <ul><li>Campaign targets Nestle’s palm oil supply by hijacking iconic brand </li></ul>
  47. Elicits negative comms response
  48. All over in 48 hours (almost)
  49. Generating media coverage
  50. Impacting the share price
  51. Achieving advocacy goals <ul><li>Two months later… </li></ul>
  52. MyDavidCameron
  53. Conservative Party: Make IT Better
  54. Where do we go from here?
  55. The challenge “ Organisations are increasingly being by-passed and power is shifting away from top-down hierarchies and towards more fluid and participative networks ” - NCVO Report, ICT Foresight: how online communities can make the internet work for the Voluntary and Community Sector
  56. Next steps <ul><li>Think about your programming and switching objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and map your relevant networks </li></ul><ul><li>Establish a presence in networks using low-cost tools </li></ul><ul><li>Programme and build networks through active participation </li></ul><ul><li>Engage with and switch other aligned networks to achieve shared goals </li></ul>
  57. Help your organisation look like this Network engagement Network management Twitter Slideshare Issuu Flickr YouTube
  58. Questions? for further conversation http://wearesocial.net

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