Design for Persuasion, Emotion and Trust

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CHRISTOPHER BUSH | HEAD OF USER EXPERIENCE | SIGMA
THIS SESSION WAS PRESENTED AT CAMP DIGITAL 2013
christopher-bush
APPLYING 'PERSUASION, EMOTION AND TRUST' (PET) DESIGN THEORY IN THE REAL WORLD

Usability is great but in an age where alternative options are only a click away is it enough? From the outside, you may have designed a shop window to display your products or services in the best possible light but what makes people take that critical step and commit to a purchase? Chris will cover the principles of Persuasion Design, or “Persuasion, Emotion and Trust” as Human Factors International defines PET Theory. They will present some real world examples of how companies are getting it right, and wrong in eCommerce.

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  • To put people at ease or to guide a decision, find creativeways to show social activity. This can be in the form of stats(favourite-by, number-of-views, comments), positive reviewsand testimonials, or visibility into the action or outcome ofother users' behaviour.
  • To put people at ease or to guide a decision, find creativeways to show social activity. This can be in the form of stats(favourite-by, number-of-views, comments), positive reviewsand testimonials, or visibility into the action or outcome ofother users' behaviour.
  • While scarcity is typically invoked to encourage purchasing behaviours, it can also be used to increase quality by giving people a limited resource --such as tokens-- with which to voteup, purchase or upload items. This introduction of a limited resource encourages people to be more judicious with the actions they take.
  • While scarcity is typically invoked to encourage purchasing behaviours, it can also be used to increase quality by giving people a limited resource --such as tokens-- with which to voteup, purchase or upload items. This introduction of a limited resource encourages people to be more judicious with the actions they take.
  • While scarcity is typically invoked to encourage purchasing behaviours, it can also be used to increase quality by giving people a limited resource --such as tokens-- with which to voteup, purchase or upload items. This introduction of a limited resource encourages people to be more judicious with the actions they take.
  • Design for Persuasion, Emotion and Trust

    1. 1. Chris Bush UX Practice Lead @wearesigma / @suthen
    2. 2. Chris Bush UX Practice Lead @wearesigma / @suthen
    3. 3. WHAT IS ‘PET’ THEORY? HOW IT IS USED THE GOOD, THE BAD & THE MISLEADING!
    4. 4. Persuasion Principles used to encourage or discourage a users behaviour during a process. Emotion Principles used to encourage any emotional response during a process such as achievement, empathy or surprise. Trust Principles used to establish confidence during a process, for example: confidence, security and credibility.
    5. 5. • Developed by Human Factors Inc. to support user engagement in the maturing digital eco-system • Based on social psychology, existing marketing principles and research on how users interact with information • A toolkit of 50+ principles to aid design decisions • Strong focus on interaction and encouraging “Will do” actions from users • Broadly compliments usability, but there are a few important exceptions
    6. 6. GetMentalNotes.com
    7. 7. SEO USABILITY PET THEORY Ability to find your site complete the task efficiently motivation to complete the task
    8. 8. SEO USABILITY PET THEORY Ability to find your site complete the task efficiently motivation to complete the task “Can do” “Will do”
    9. 9. SEO USABILITY PET THEORY Ability to find your site complete the task efficiently motivation to complete the task “Can do” “Will do” Encourage, Motivate, Constrain
    10. 10. Usability An easy to use door
    11. 11. Persuasion A door you’re motivated to enter
    12. 12. Persuasion Looks like an inviting place to rest
    13. 13. Persuasion A bench which constrains behaviour
    14. 14. A brief exploration of some of the techniques
    15. 15. A list of some of the Persuasion techniques. • Authority. Use your authority and others will obey. • Contrast. We notice and decide by difference between two things, not absolutes. • Framing. Our perception is influenced by the information we are presented. • Limited Duration. Given a choice between action and inaction, a limited time to respond increases the likelihood that people will participate. • Scarcity. I want now what I may not be able to get in the future. • Social Proof. When uncertain we take cues from other people. • Trigger. We need small nudges placed on our regular paths to remind and motivate us to take action.
    16. 16. We tend to follow the patterns of similar people in new or unfamiliar situations
    17. 17.
    18. 18. › SOCIAL PROF Likes and Likes & reviews
    19. 19. We infer value in something that has limited availability or is promoted as being scarce
    20. 20. › Scarcity Limited duration
    21. 21. We notice and decide by difference between two things, not absolutes
    22. 22. Which form received the most clicks?
    23. 23. 21% more clicks
    24. 24. We need small nudges placed on our regular paths to remind and motivate us to take action
    25. 25. 80% less spillage
    26. 26. I dread to think…
    27. 27. Click me!
    28. 28. The following summary describes some of the Emotion principles. • Aesthetic usability. Aesthetically pleasing designs are often perceived to be easier to use. • Behavioural processing. We respond favourably to learned, expected behaviours. • Delight. We remember and respond favourably to small, unexpected and playful pleasures. • Goal setting. We are compelled to strive to achieve a goal if it is achievable. • Knowledge of results. We continue our actions if we are shown evidence of their success. • Optimal level of challenge. We like to be challenged and tested, but not too much. • Social contagion. Our emotions are affected by the actions of those we see around us.
    29. 29. We are compelled to strive to achieve a goal if it is achievable
    30. 30. GOAL SETTING
    31. 31. We remember and respond favourably to small, unexpected and playful pleasures.
    32. 32. Trust is influenced by a combination of factors which act as Trust Markers. • Design quality. We perceive value in the things we see. • Current content. Up-to-date content indicates freshness and responsiveness. • Extensive quality content. We trust an authority that is plentiful with knowledgeable. • Affiliation. We judge other based on their recommendations and affiliations. • Certifications. We trust established, certified organisations and trademarks. • Testimonials. We trust organisations who trust and value their customers opinions
    33. 33. We trust established, certified organisations and trademarks
    34. 34. › Reinforced secure check out button Known and trusted money handling companies
    35. 35. Well, yeah!
    36. 36. USE PET SPARINGLY Authority & Difference Authority
    37. 37. USE TECHNIQUES THAT SUPPORT YOUR BUSINESS GOALS Goal setting Framing
    38. 38. DON’T OVERLOAD THE USER Trigger Social proof Scarcity Social proof Framing Social proof
    39. 39. › DON’T DISTORT THE TRUTH (LIMITED DURATION )
    40. 40. Sites designed to obscure information or trick users (Examples from Darkpatterns.org)
    41. 41. Tries to trick you in to buying insurance Very difficult to opt-out
    42. 42. The new site is much better But still very difficult to opt-out
    43. 43. Comet thought it was a good idea to add things to your basket.
    44. 44. • BJ Fogg and the Persuasive Tech lab http://captology.stanford.edu/invisible-resource/design-for-impact.html • Susan Weinschenk http://theteamw.com http://theteamw.com/#books Recommend – ‘Neuro Web design’, ‘100 Things Every Designer Needs To Know About People’ and ‘How to get people to do stuff’ • Joe Leech @MrJoe http://psychologyfordesigners.com • Mailchimp & Aarron Walter http://aarronwalter.com http://www.abookapart.com/products/designing-for-emotion http://www.toneandvoice.com • Changing minds http://changingminds.org/principles/principles.htm • Mental notes http://www.getmentalnotes.com http://www.getmentalnotes.com/cards
    45. 45. Any questions? Christopher J Bush Head of User Experience wearesigma.com @wearesigma @suthen
    46. 46. W: wearesigma.com E: hello@wearesigma.com P: +44 (0)1625 427718 SIGMA Ropewalks Building Newton Street, Macclesfield, Cheshire SK11 6QJ

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