Oded Ran: How To Delight Users

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Oded's Immersive slides for Like Minds Autumn 2010: Creativity and Curation

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  • The painful process that is involved in changing priorities:
    Effect on network operators and phone manufacturers
    Effect on other Microsoft product and employees
    Effect on developers who have to re-write apps
    Effect on enterprises which deployed the software

    The decision is not a clear one:
    - Who comes first in BlackBerry? In Apple? In Android?
  • Oded Ran: How To Delight Users

    1. 1. how to delight customers? Lessons from our work on Windows Phone 7Oded Ran Head of Consumer Marketing, Windows Phone UK
    2. 2. Things we’ll speak about today  Understand for whom you currently designing your products or services. Change course, if needed.  Review what research says about customers satisfaction and happiness, why it matters, and what drives it.  Share lessons from our work on Windows Phone 7.  Practice these models on the products or services you’re working on.
    3. 3. Who am I  Product person that does marketing  Marketing person that does product  I love managing and launching consumer mobile products.  I worked in UK, US and Israel.  I love films, foreign languages, traveling and cats. Not necessarily in that order 
    4. 4. Brief history of timeWindows Phone? What?
    5. 5. Who did we design our product for? Network operator Phone manufacturer Microsoft / Windows Developers EnterprisesEnd userDesign No one really
    6. 6. Windows Mobile Network operator Phone manufacturer Microsoft / Windows Developers EnterprisesEnd userDesign No one really
    7. 7. Who do they design their product or service for?
    8. 8. Who do they design their product or service for?
    9. 9. Who do they design their product or service for?
    10. 10. Who do you design your products or services for?
    11. 11. CHANGING DIRECTION “If you do not change direction, you may end up where you are heading”. - Lao Tzu
    12. 12. Who did we design for? Network operator Phone manufacturer Microsoft / Windows Developers EnterprisesEnd userDesign No one really Who should we design for? End user Network operator Phone manufacturer Microsoft / Windows
    13. 13. So who’s our end user? total market opportunity people who will buy smartphones measuring total market opportunity at time of launch persona representational user & muse of the brand portrays richness of experience and aspirational qualities addressable market people who could buy it measuring market potential target customer people whom we will build for and market to a lens of focus for value prop based on market data Life Maximizers, 15%
    14. 14. Targeting “Life Maximizers”
    15. 15. Targeting “Life Maximizers”
    16. 16. Who we design for: Anna & Miles Anna Part time PR professional and busy mum “My life is a balancing act between work, family, friends, and my own personal needs.” Miles Growing his own architectural business “I love running my life real-time so I can take advantage of whatever is inspiring me…whether it’s a new project, a pick up game or a stolen moment with Anna.”
    17. 17. Before we continue: Why should we care if Anna & Miles are happy?
    18. 18.  Customer satisfaction drives higher ROI and excess shareholder value  $£€ Sources: Fornell et al., 2006; Fornell, Mithas, & Morgeson, 2009; Wang & Zhao, 2009; Tuli & Bharadwaj, 2009; Matzler et al., 2005; Gupta & Zeithaml, 2006; Aksoy et al., 2008.
    19. 19. Happy customers also are shown to  Talk to more people about their positive experience  Become repeat customers  Pay more or purchase more  Stay loyal to your brand  Drive marketing for you  Provide useful feedback  Safeguard your brand against unhappy customers
    20. 20. The $1bn question: What makes us happy?
    21. 21. What makes us happy? Autonomy feeling that your activities are self-chosen Sources: Reis et al. (2000). “Daily Well-Being: The Role of Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness”. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26 (4), p. 419-435. Hunt, T. (2008). Happiness as Your Biz Model. Retrieved from http://slidesha.re/d680AW. Competence feeling that you are effective in your activities Relatedness feeling understood and appreciated
    22. 22. Autonomy  Feeling in control of one’s surroundings  Understanding one’s own resilience  Feeling of agency  Empowerment
    23. 23. Autonomy Lessons from Windows Phone 7
    24. 24. How to create feelings of autonomy?  Give people tools to personalize their experiences  Build tools that democratize previously inaccessible industries  Offer clear and attractive choices  Be open and transparent  Don’t lock people in
    25. 25. How would you create feelings of autonomy in your product/service?
    26. 26. Competence  Confidence in one’s abilities and strengths  Feedback from others on one’s performance  Learning and growing skills  Self-actualization  Doing meaningful work  Getting into flow
    27. 27. Competence Lessons from Windows Phone 7
    28. 28. How to create feelings of competence?  build consecutive levels of achievement into the experience  don’t talk down to your customer  plant ‘easter eggs’  create flow...simple entry point to more complex systems  allow ways for mentors to interact with newbies (create rewards)
    29. 29. How would you create feelings of competence in your product/service?
    30. 30. Relatedness  Feeling understood and appreciated  A sense of closeness with others  Talking about things that matter  Hanging out with others  Doing pleasant, fun things  Avoiding self-consciousness
    31. 31. Relatedness Lessons from Windows Phone 7
    32. 32. How to create feelings of relatedness?  Design simple ways for customers to share  Build in multiple ways for customers to interact  Create experiences that meet customers’ offline lives  Have many collaborative experiences
    33. 33. How would you create feelings of relatedness in your product/service?
    34. 34. Summary  Design for the end-user  Autonomy Personalization, transparency, openness, empowerment  Competence Self-learning, confidence, Easter eggs, discoverability  Relatedness Sharing, closeness, experiences connected to one’s life  Buy a Windows Phone 
    35. 35. Further reading  Hunt, T. (2007). Happiness as Your Business Model. Retrieved from http://slidesha.re/d680AW and http://slidesha.re/10UdVH. Two great presentations which form the basis for this presentation.  Reis et al. (2000). “Daily Well-Being: The Role of Autonomy, Competence, and Relatedness”. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26 (4), p. 419-435. The scientific foundation for many of the ideas in this presentation.
    36. 36. Photo credits  Flickr (under creative commons):  http://www.flickr.com/photos/seandreilinger/959 864706/sizes/o/in/photostream/
    37. 37. Thank you!

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