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Climate analysis application in Cape Town
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Climate analysis application in Cape Town

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weADAPT has been working with the Climate Information Portal (CIP)run by CSAG at the Climate Systems Analysis Group in Cape Town to integrate each others platform into their own. Whereas weADAPT has a …

weADAPT has been working with the Climate Information Portal (CIP)run by CSAG at the Climate Systems Analysis Group in Cape Town to integrate each others platform into their own. Whereas weADAPT has a wealth of case studies on climate change adaptation, CIP has developed a robust methodology to downscale climate information to hundreds of climate stations in Africa and Asia. Having access to climate science information alongside your adaptation case study can be hugely valuable for end users, and we see a lot of potential in comparing the two. In terms of support, we have developed an 8-step guidance page to show users the best way to use the integrated data, and also a case study which has used the applied the guidance steps in a flooding scenario in Cape Town, South Africa.

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  • This presentation describes how weADAPT can be used together with the Climate Information Portal (CIP) to quickly and easily access climate data for many locations across Africa, using an interactive map. By linking the two portals, users are able to see the climate data context as they read about a project, or to find data to support their own research, project planning or policy design in a specific place or area.
  • You might ask questions such as: When have climate impacts been experienced in the past? What time of year was it (episodes to look at in the climate data)? How often does it happen? What else was happening at that time that compounded the unfavourable climate conditions and made the impacts worse?
  • For any location, there may be a wide range of climate data available, only some of which are relevant to what you are doing – for example, temperature projections are unlikely to be relevant in gauging future flood risks, but they would be in evaluating future irrigation needs. You should only include climate data and graphs in your reports that help explain the problem you are highlighting, the course of action you propose, and your reasons for selecting certain actions or interventions over other options.
  • In some cases the closest station in terms of distance is not the most similar. Think about the influence of elevation, mountains, water bodies, forests, etc. when making your station selection. When the rainy periods are – which month gets the most rainfall on average? The average temperature range through the year;What time period data are available for (how far back does the record go, and how recently does it end?). You might like to download the graphic showing historical climate monthly averages so that you can add it to your project documentation, because it gives a good overview of the average climate as it has been in this place over the last few decades. If the station is not close to your project / study site, you might want to add some text drawing attention to the extent that there might be local variability in the climate. The extent of such variability is place-specific, depending on the topography, land cover, proximity to the ocean, etc.While finding the most suitable stations to work with, also check the other placemarks in the area to see what other projects are going on there: Has anyone else already conducted a climate analysis, vulnerability assessment, done an impact assessment or implemented an adaptation plan in the vicinity of your project site and uploaded information about it on weADAPT that you can learn from?
  • In some cases the closest station in terms of distance is not the most similar. Think about the influence of elevation, mountains, water bodies, forests, etc. when making your station selection. When the rainy periods are – which month gets the most rainfall on average? The average temperature range through the year;What time period data are available for (how far back does the record go, and how recently does it end?). You might like to download the graphic showing historical climate monthly averages so that you can add it to your project documentation, because it gives a good overview of the average climate as it has been in this place over the last few decades. If the station is not close to your project / study site, you might want to add some text drawing attention to the extent that there might be local variability in the climate. The extent of such variability is place-specific, depending on the topography, land cover, proximity to the ocean, etc.While finding the most suitable stations to work with, also check the other placemarks in the area to see what other projects are going on there: Has anyone else already conducted a climate analysis, vulnerability assessment, done an impact assessment or implemented an adaptation plan in the vicinity of your project site and uploaded information about it on weADAPT that you can learn from?
  • In some cases the closest station in terms of distance is not the most similar. Think about the influence of elevation, mountains, water bodies, forests, etc. when making your station selection. When the rainy periods are – which month gets the most rainfall on average? The average temperature range through the year;What time period data are available for (how far back does the record go, and how recently does it end?). You might like to download the graphic showing historical climate monthly averages so that you can add it to your project documentation, because it gives a good overview of the average climate as it has been in this place over the last few decades. If the station is not close to your project / study site, you might want to add some text drawing attention to the extent that there might be local variability in the climate. The extent of such variability is place-specific, depending on the topography, land cover, proximity to the ocean, etc.While finding the most suitable stations to work with, also check the other placemarks in the area to see what other projects are going on there: Has anyone else already conducted a climate analysis, vulnerability assessment, done an impact assessment or implemented an adaptation plan in the vicinity of your project site and uploaded information about it on weADAPT that you can learn from?
  • In some cases the closest station in terms of distance is not the most similar. Think about the influence of elevation, mountains, water bodies, forests, etc. when making your station selection. When the rainy periods are – which month gets the most rainfall on average? The average temperature range through the year;What time period data are available for (how far back does the record go, and how recently does it end?). You might like to download the graphic showing historical climate monthly averages so that you can add it to your project documentation, because it gives a good overview of the average climate as it has been in this place over the last few decades. If the station is not close to your project / study site, you might want to add some text drawing attention to the extent that there might be local variability in the climate. The extent of such variability is place-specific, depending on the topography, land cover, proximity to the ocean, etc.While finding the most suitable stations to work with, also check the other placemarks in the area to see what other projects are going on there: Has anyone else already conducted a climate analysis, vulnerability assessment, done an impact assessment or implemented an adaptation plan in the vicinity of your project site and uploaded information about it on weADAPT that you can learn from?
  • For example, how did they select which option to go for? How did they finance it? How are they monitoring the impacts?
  • This way, if someone else wants to learn from your experience, or build on it further, they can. And if they need to do a climate assessment for their location, they can look at the steps you’ve followed as an example!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Using climate information to support adaptationplanning and policy-making: A step-by-step guideA vegetable farmer in Philippi, a suburb of Cape Town, South Africa. Source: FLICKR/KOSMOSELEEVIKE
    • 2. Make sure you have completed these preliminary stepsbefore you start Conducted a basic vulnerability assessment (Link to guidance=http://weadapt.org/knowledge-base/vulnerability/guidance-for-assessing-vulnerability) Identified the key climate sensitivities and in particular taking into account thefollowing? livelihoods/ and economic activities? Infrastructure and services relied upon for that site?
    • 3. Why?• You may not have thought about your problem as aquestion yet, but this can be a useful exercise notleast because you can always check back to thisquestion to see if you are answering it.How?• Set out some parameters of your problem by askingyourself, ‘what do I want to get out of this process’.Having realistic expectations of the answer isimportant at this stage.Step 1: Define the question© Micky Aldridge
    • 4. Step 2: locate the right climate station3. Navigate to where you are working and lookat what stations are around where your casestudy area is located.1. Go to the Adaptation Layer.2. Turn on the climate stations by pressing "viewclimate stations“.4. Click on the closest station.
    • 5. Step 3: Investigate historical records3. Now you can look at the whole time series ofthe historical data recorded at this station,looking across all the years.1. Click through into CIP from the weADAPT placemark tolook at more information that lies “behind” this overview.2. Click on historical monthly data record.4. Which climate variables are available inCIP? (Look at the drop-down menu.)How do these match up with the ones youwanted to look at, identified in Step 1?What extremes and patterns do you notice?
    • 6. Step 4: Investigate future projections3. Looking at the projections consider; a) isthere a clear direction of change at criticaltimes of year that most of the models agreeon? b) How much is that change? How wide isthe uncertainty range?1. Click through to the future climatescenarios (also referred to as downscaledprojections) for that station.2. Look at the variables you are interested in andcompare the spread of projections across thetwo different emissions scenarios.4. The default time period of projections displayed is2040-2060, but you can change these on the sliderbar as relevant to your needs.
    • 7. Step 5: Check for consistency withproximal stations3. Check the historical data for consistency1. Close the content box to reveal the mapbehind it.2. Look at what other stations are also nearby theproject site (check across the different datasets).4. Check the future projections. Note, should there beinconsistencies, there may well be mitigatingcircumstances, for example Cape Point station islocated on a peninsula where temperature is heavilyaffected by its maritime influences.
    • 8. Step 6: Analysis• Look back over the informationyou have gathered during Steps 2-5• What can you say about theclimate in this place? How might itchange under various futurescenarios, and what this mightmean for those who live and workthere?• What could be done differently toadapt to current climateconditions and prepare for howthese patterns might shift in thefuture?
    • 9. Step 7: Compare with other adaptation studies• Go back into weADAPTand search theAdaptation Layer forprojects elsewheretackling similar climaterisks to see:– What adaptation optionsare they testing orpromoting that might beworth considering asoptions in your study orproject?– Who has experiences ofimplementingadaptation measuresthat you might be ableto learn from?
    • 10. Step 8: Share your work• Document and share whatyou’ve done by adding it to theweADAPT platform• The easiest way to do this isthrough the QuickShare form• For guidance on how to sharecontent via weADAPT go to:http://weadapt.org/knowledge-base/guidance/share
    • 11. Useful links• To see a how we work through these steps in a case study focussing onland use management and zoning in a suburb of the city of Cape Town,South Africa, go to: http://weadapt.org/knowledge-base/using-climate-information/using-climate-information-case-study• To view the full climate guidance, go to: http://weadapt.org/knowledge-base/using-climate-information/guide-to-using-climate-information