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9 takeaways I got from attending HighEdWeb 2013. Focus on communications and marketing strategy in higher education, including use of social media, multi-format approaches, multi-device web sites, …

9 takeaways I got from attending HighEdWeb 2013. Focus on communications and marketing strategy in higher education, including use of social media, multi-format approaches, multi-device web sites, competetive analysis, infographics, and engaging students as content creators.

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  • 1. HighEdWeb 2013 9 Takeaways
  • 2. HighEdWeb 2013 • Annual conference of HighEdWeb Association – web professionals working in higher education. • Three days of sessions, plus for extra registration, special workshops and a leadership academy. • This year, Buffalo, NY, next year, Portland, OR. • Web site: http://www.highedweb.org
  • 3. Takeaway #1 In thinking about how you manage a university web site – or other asset, like a brand – try to think of yourself not as the "police" but as a "steward" of a major university asset. Anne Edmondson
  • 4. Takeaway #2 Social media in a crisis situation: – You will still use regular, "traditional" tools, but social media is more effective in real time. – Social media is not optional. – Social media gives you a chance to correct misinformation – by media or say by online rumors. – Monitoring Twitter, you might know about "situations" even before police do, as happened at URI. Cindy Sabato & Kerri Hicks University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI
  • 5. Takeaway #3 Differences in communications formats: – Print: specific information with short shelf-life, meant to be taken away / given out. – Web: Dynamic, updating, timely. – Social Media: instant, fast, everdiverging (into new platforms). Jennifer Younker & Romana Amato Saint Xavier
  • 6. Takeaway #4 If your organization goofs in social media: – – – – Respond with a human touch. Humor works. Poke fun at yourself. Deflate situation – if it’s not serious. For imposter accts. – report to Twitter and to the real person being spoofed. Donna Talarico Elizabethtown College, Elizabethtown, PA
  • 7. Takeaway #5 Web sites beyond the desktop: – We’re now in an age of ubiquitous computing. – 1st World Phenom: using more than one device, sometimes simultaneously – Tablet traffic now surpassing smartphones for viewing web site (Dec. 2012). Doug Gapinsky mStoner
  • 8. Takeaway #6 Competitive analysis: – Competitive analysis is a good way of "giving your work a shot in the arm. " – Do it better than others. Don’t copy, but get inspired and tweak it to make it better. Rick Allen Meet Content
  • 9. Takeaway #7 Take fast facts – student admissions, majors, numbers of courses, number of PhDs, etc. – and turn them into cool graphs and info graphics. Jennifer Younker & Romana Amato Saint Xavier University, Chicago, IL
  • 10. Takeaway #8 Do the "listening loop-theloop": See what students are doing, thinking, posting, then react by filling demand, partnering with students. Key point: Student content = the realest of "real talk." And students know fake. Ma’ayan Plaut Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH
  • 11. Takeaway #9 Two tips for working with students on content: – It’s an investment in quality content. – It’s not about being a time saver or grabbing cheaper labor, it’s a redistribution of labor that benefits both parties. Ma’ayan Plaut Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH