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How You Present Findings Can Affect Your Credibility Upload
 

How You Present Findings Can Affect Your Credibility Upload

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Presented at UPA 2009 in Portland as a kind of "interactive usability evaluation" session on June 11, 2009.

Presented at UPA 2009 in Portland as a kind of "interactive usability evaluation" session on June 11, 2009.

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  • You are a user experience professional. You make experiences better. A presentation is an experience. You can do it.

How You Present Findings Can Affect Your Credibility Upload How You Present Findings Can Affect Your Credibility Upload Presentation Transcript

  • How you present findings can affect your credibility and influence Wendy Castleman Central Experience Design Presented in June 2009 at UPA in Portland, OR
  • Mad*Pow Brainstorm from UPA 2008 • Convincing senior management • Build rapport with engineers • Selling to management • Selling your UX group to development • How to get your developer to listen • Ways to change attitudes in a siloed environment Help me be more • Convert user research into design • Integrating user research • Usability seem as more than just web design • Getting testing buy in • Being more effective/commanding respect from developers influential • What not to do • Overall development process w/ usability woven in and roles defined • Culture and personality considerations • Institutionalizing usability • Talking to management about usability • How do I get project teams to bring in UX people early on? • Best way to be effective when you're the ONLY UX person? • Keep UX in the institution • How to teach people that think they know the user • Complaints from public • Speaking • How to make good presentation and effective selling of usability • More about marketing a UX team • Evolution of the field • Getting buy-in from developers and designers • Communications techniques • Tech vs. usability concerns, how to bridge the gap • How to best present usability review results • Working with other team members • Managing politics • How to share UX way of thinking in the company • So you're all experts: How were devaluing the currency of our profession • How to get past the boss and get your ideas implemented. • Increasing impact at your company Source: http://www.madpow.net/mad-pow-our-company-events_topics.html
  • The biggest obstacle for usability professionals in the corporate world is their inability to make findings relevant to the decision-makers. - Senior Executive at a Fortune 500 Company
  • Presenting Findings Presentation Report
  • Presentations are often: Built around what you have to say, rather than what your user (audience) wants to know
  • Presentations are often: Too complex with too much detail
  • Presentations are often: Confusing about where the user needs to look
  • Presentations are often: Not tested before launch (practice)
  • So What? Presentations are often: Lacking Help (recommendations or call to action)
  • Slide Design Blunders…
  • Four levels or more of bullets • Bullet Point – Sub Bullet • Sub-Sub Bullet • Sub-Sub Bullet – Sub-Sub-Sub Bullet – Sub-Sub-Sub Bullet » Sub-Sub-Sub-Sub-Bullet – Sub-Sub-Sub Bullet • Sub-Sub Bullet – Sub Bullet
  • Paragraphs • These are the types of slides that include lots of full sentences that belong in some type of written document. They are fine for an occasional quote, or for a handout, but they are not useful for presentations. • The problem is that people end up reading these bullet paragraphs and not spending any time at all really attending to you, the speaker. • The point is that writing all of your talk out in this level of detail makes for a very information-dense slide that people have to spend lots of time digesting before they can make any kind of sense of it. It can be exhausting for the audience, and certainly doesn’t build the credibility of the speaker, who no one is paying any attention to at all anymore.
  • Small Fonts How do I make a comment?
  • Imagery Style Mismatch
  • Complex Tables Panelist_ID S2 S3 BT2 BT3 PV2 PV3 Q2 Q3 Q4 10333 Success Failure 205 262 15 22 2 1 N/A 52933 Failure Failure 91 203 9 6 2 1 N/A 61556 Success Failure 215 218 8 12 2 2 N/A 64130 Failure Failure 118 122 11 8 2 1 N/A 73010 Failure Failure 356 206 0 0 2 1 N/A 85996 Failure Success 310 292 20 22 2 1 N/A 89408 Success Failure 94 192 8 16 2 2 N/A 92959 Success Failure 194 163 11 8 2 1 N/A 102869 Failure Failure 464 199 15 6 2 2 N/A 125887 Success Success 77 203 6 16 2 2 N/A 153201 Success Failure 132 81 8 7 2 1 N/A 165772 Failure Giveup 364 299 9 5 2 2 N/A 196642 Success Failure 357 252 15 13 2 1 N/A 209852 Failure Failure 236 231 17 14 2 2 N/A 215475 Failure Failure 203 140 10 7 1 2 2 217429 Success Failure 149 113 11 9 2 1 N/A 224050 Success Success 223 239 12 14 2 1 N/A 234106 Success Failure 179 158 12 7 1 2 2 234144 Success Failure 203 458 3 8 1 1 1 298661 Success Failure 607 433 9 9 2 2 N/A 319284 Success Success 367 424 0 0 2 1 N/A 332580 Success Success 223 170 0 0 2 1 N/A 335480 Success Failure 220 149 6 7 2 2 N/A
  • Poor use of color • Description of something really important • Description of something really important • Description of something really important • Description of something really important • Description of something really important
  • Confusing Diagrams This way out
  • Inappropriate Charts 500% 400% 300% Success 200% Failure 100% Time on Task Time on Task 0% Failure Success Task 1 Task 2 Task 3 Overall
  • Using bullet points where graphics would be more effective • We had 25 participants – 3 Aged 18-24 – 15 Aged 25-40 – 7 Aged 40-60 • All used Product X • All have a PC • All are independent contractors
  • Random Layout of Images • Examples of items on desks
  • build credibility and influence Secret Sauce
  • We are great at understanding what users need!
  • We can use those same skills for presentations
  • Who is your audience (aka user)? Executives Developers Designers Researchers
  • What do they need?
  • What is important to them? Executives Developers • Sales • Minimizing rework • Reputation • Delivering on-time • Money… • Building a product people rave about…
  • How can you/your research help them? Avoid costs, Prioritize efforts, increase sales less rework, more cool
  • Traditional presentation?
  • Alternate presentation? Hidden opportunities within our own product…
  • Hidden opportunities within our own product (Example) We can do it by Want to raise sales making a few How? next month? simple changes to our website Did you know that They can’t figure we are losing out the difference They can’t find how customers who between our much it costs! come to our site? products! But, we know what They can’t figure …and we can do it will overcome these out how to buy! in the next release. barriers…
  • Great Resources
  • Apply your expertise in usability to presentation slides
  • Let’s evaluate some real slides…
  • DISCUSSION
  • Let’s Continue the conversation… Wendy_castleman@intuit.com
  • 10 key things to consider when presenting findings from user research: 1. A presentation is not a report – the level of detail and layout of the slides needs to be appropriate for presenting, not reading 2. Design your presentation for your audience – keep in mind who are they, why are they there, what is important for them, what do you want them to do, etc. 3. One message per slide – one message to understand will keep the flow of the presentation simple 4. Lure the audience in – tell a story with the presentation. Build in mystery or tension so they will be engaged (but be sure to resolve it within the presentation) 5. Use the right visuals – make sure that all charts, graphs, diagrams and other visualizations are crystal clear 6. Focus attention on what you want them to see – especially important in data presentation 7. Humanize the findings – use faces, quotes or even video highlight clips to make the stories real 8. Limit the detail – a presentation should not cover everything, just the important points that people need to walk away with 9. Answer: So what? - help the audience understand why the finding is important to them and what they should do about it. 10. Keep it short - Plan on taking up ½ of the time allotted. This way, you’ll build in a buffer for further explanation, Q&A, etc. Plus, people’s time is valuable, so the gift of getting done early is a big bonus!