UbD Workshop Hillsboro/Hopkinton 10-09-09
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    UbD Workshop Hillsboro/Hopkinton 10-09-09 UbD Workshop Hillsboro/Hopkinton 10-09-09 Presentation Transcript

    • Understanding By Design Hopkinton/Hillsboro School District Workshop Day October 9, 2009
    • Goals for Today
    • Goals for Today You will gain a more complete knowledge of how UbD can revitalize your teaching.
    • Goals for Today You will gain a more complete knowledge of how UbD can revitalize your teaching. You will leave the workshop with at least the beginnings of a gourmet UbD unit that you can implement right away.
    • Goals for Today You will gain a more complete knowledge of how UbD can revitalize your teaching. You will leave the workshop with at least the beginnings of a gourmet UbD unit that you can implement right away. WHAT IDEAS DO YOU HAVE FOR A UNIT?
    • Goals for Today You will gain a more complete knowledge of how UbD can revitalize your teaching. You will leave the workshop with at least the beginnings of a gourmet UbD unit that you can implement right away. WHAT IDEAS DO YOU HAVE FOR A UNIT? You can pick a unit you already teach, or something brand new.
    • INTROS
    • Overview of UbD
    • Thinking about Understanding To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear understanding of your destination. It means to know where you’re going so that you can better understand where you are now so that the steps you take are always in the right direction-Steven Covey The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. “What do we mean by knowing?” Mahesh Sharma
    • What is UbD?
    • What is UbD? A framework which synthesizes research- based best practices in curriculum, assessment, and instruction.
    • What is UbD? A framework which synthesizes research- based best practices in curriculum, assessment, and instruction. A language which educators can use to describe and analyze the best ways to promote student understanding, rather than just knowledge/recall.
    • What isn’t UbD?
    • What isn’t UbD? It is not a program.
    • What isn’t UbD? It is not a program. It is not one more thing for you to have to do
    • What isn’t UbD? It is not a program. It is not one more thing for you to have to do It does not includes anything that hasn’t been used by master teachers throughout the centuries
    • C.I.A.
    • C.I.A. Curriculum: The blueprint for instruction.
    • C.I.A. Curriculum: The blueprint for instruction. Instruction: The strategies for delivering the curriculum.
    • C.I.A. Curriculum: The blueprint for instruction. Instruction: The strategies for delivering the curriculum. Assessment: Measures the effectiveness of curriculum and instruction.
    • Research to back up UbD
    • Research to back up UbD Students learn best when they actively construct meaning through experience-based activities
    • Research to back up UbD Students learn best when they actively construct meaning through experience-based activities A student’s culture, experiences, and previous knowledge shape all new learning
    • How Are We Doing?
    • How Are We Doing? Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and James Stigler’s UCLA Meta-Study of Teacher Behaviors:
    • How Are We Doing? Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and James Stigler’s UCLA Meta-Study of Teacher Behaviors: We outperformed only six countries out of 46.
    • How Are We Doing? Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and James Stigler’s UCLA Meta-Study of Teacher Behaviors: We outperformed only six countries out of 46. Unlike high-performing countries, we tend to emphasize practice and skill development, not thinking, inventing, and problem solving.
    • In US, we emphasize coverage of material with many topic segments, rather than a limited set taught in depth.
    • In US, we emphasize coverage of material with many topic segments, rather than a limited set taught in depth. Our US curriculum tends to be a “mile-wide, inch-deep.”
    • In US, we emphasize coverage of material with many topic segments, rather than a limited set taught in depth. Our US curriculum tends to be a “mile-wide, inch-deep.” We often emphasize subjects and content rather than the learner as the center of the learning process.
    • An Overloaded Curriculum Robert Marzano (McRel): “If teachers are expected to get students to learn all of the standards identified by their district, on average we need to expand students’ time in school by a minimum of 6,000 hours.”
    • Priority Driven Curriculum Clearly distinguishes between what is worth being familiar with and what all students need to know, be able to do, and understand
    • Backward Instructional Design
    • Backward Instructional Design Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives).
    • Backward Instructional Design Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives). Stage Two: Determining acceptable evidence to assess and to evaluate student achievement of desired results.
    • Backward Instructional Design Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives). Stage Two: Determining acceptable evidence to assess and to evaluate student achievement of desired results. Stage Three: Designing learning activities to promote student mastery and success on assessment tasks.
    • STAGE 1
    • STAGE 1 Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives).
    • STAGE 1 Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives). Stage Two: Determining acceptable evidence to assess and to evaluate student achievement of desired results.
    • STAGE 1 Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives). Stage Two: Determining acceptable evidence to assess and to evaluate student achievement of desired results. Stage Three: Designing learning activities to promote student mastery and success on assessment tasks.
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1 How are Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment related?
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1 How are Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment related? What is Understanding?
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1 How are Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment related? What is Understanding? What is a Big Idea?
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1 How are Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment related? What is Understanding? What is a Big Idea? What is an Enduring Understanding?
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1 How are Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment related? What is Understanding? What is a Big Idea? What is an Enduring Understanding? What is an Essential Question?
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1 How are Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment related? What is Understanding? What is a Big Idea? What is an Enduring Understanding? What is an Essential Question? What is the difference between a Big Idea, an Enduring Understanding, a Demanding Question and an Essential Question?
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1 How are Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment related? What is Understanding? What is a Big Idea? What is an Enduring Understanding? What is an Essential Question? What is the difference between a Big Idea, an Enduring Understanding, a Demanding Question and an Essential Question? What are educational standards and how can I use them within my units?
    • Demanding Questions for Stage 1 How are Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment related? What is Understanding? What is a Big Idea? What is an Enduring Understanding? What is an Essential Question? What is the difference between a Big Idea, an Enduring Understanding, a Demanding Question and an Essential Question? What are educational standards and how can I use them within my units? What knowledge and skills should I include in my units?
    • 6 Facets of Understanding p. 23
    • 6 Facets of Understanding p. 23 Can explain: provide thorough, supported, and justifiable accounts of phenomena, facts, and data.
    • 6 Facets of Understanding p. 23 Can explain: provide thorough, supported, and justifiable accounts of phenomena, facts, and data. • Can interpret: tell meaningful stories; offer apt translations; provide a revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events; make it personal or accessible through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models.
    • 6 Facets of Understanding p. 23 Can explain: provide thorough, supported, and justifiable accounts of phenomena, facts, and data. • Can interpret: tell meaningful stories; offer apt translations; provide a revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events; make it personal or accessible through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models. • Can apply: effectively use and adapt what we know in diverse contexts.
    • 6 Facets of Understanding p. 23 Can explain: provide thorough, supported, and justifiable accounts of phenomena, facts, and data. • Can interpret: tell meaningful stories; offer apt translations; provide a revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events; make it personal or accessible through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models. • Can apply: effectively use and adapt what we know in diverse contexts. • Have perspective: see and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears; see the big picture.
    • 6 Facets of Understanding p. 23 Can explain: provide thorough, supported, and justifiable accounts of phenomena, facts, and data. • Can interpret: tell meaningful stories; offer apt translations; provide a revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events; make it personal or accessible through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models. • Can apply: effectively use and adapt what we know in diverse contexts. • Have perspective: see and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears; see the big picture. • Can empathize: find value in what others might find odd, alien, or implausible; perceive sensitively on the basis of prior direct experience.
    • 6 Facets of Understanding p. 23 Can explain: provide thorough, supported, and justifiable accounts of phenomena, facts, and data. • Can interpret: tell meaningful stories; offer apt translations; provide a revealing historical or personal dimension to ideas and events; make it personal or accessible through images, anecdotes, analogies, and models. • Can apply: effectively use and adapt what we know in diverse contexts. • Have perspective: see and hear points of view through critical eyes and ears; see the big picture. • Can empathize: find value in what others might find odd, alien, or implausible; perceive sensitively on the basis of prior direct experience. • Have self-knowledge: perceive the personal style, prejudices, projections, and habits of mind that both shape and impede our own understanding; we are aware of what we do not understand and why understanding is so hard.
    • Big Ideas Lynn Erickson (2001) Big Ideas: • Broad and abstract • Represented by one or two words • Universal in application • Timeless-carries through the ages
    • Big Idea examples
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats):
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats): Central Tendency
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats): Central Tendency Judging and ranking
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats): Central Tendency Judging and ranking From Reading:
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats): Central Tendency Judging and ranking From Reading: Reading for Meaning
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats): Central Tendency Judging and ranking From Reading: Reading for Meaning Fluency
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats): Central Tendency Judging and ranking From Reading: Reading for Meaning Fluency History
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats): Central Tendency Judging and ranking From Reading: Reading for Meaning Fluency History Slavery
    • Big Idea examples From Math (Stats): Central Tendency Judging and ranking From Reading: Reading for Meaning Fluency History Slavery Federal vs. States’ rights
    • Other big ideas
    • Other big ideas Social Studies:
    • Other big ideas Social Studies: Conflict
    • Other big ideas Social Studies: Conflict Revolution
    • Other big ideas Social Studies: Conflict Revolution Peace
    • Take a minute to develop a Big Idea or two for your unit. Let’s share some:
    • Enduring Understandings
    • Enduring Understandings Involve the Big Ideas that give meaning and importance to facts.
    • Enduring Understandings Involve the Big Ideas that give meaning and importance to facts. Can transfer to other fields and adult life.
    • Enduring Understandings Involve the Big Ideas that give meaning and importance to facts. Can transfer to other fields and adult life. Is usually not obvious. It’s not a fact-it’s an inference
    • Enduring Understandings Involve the Big Ideas that give meaning and importance to facts. Can transfer to other fields and adult life. Is usually not obvious. It’s not a fact-it’s an inference Is framed as a generalization-the “moral of the story”
    • Enduring Understandings Involve the Big Ideas that give meaning and importance to facts. Can transfer to other fields and adult life. Is usually not obvious. It’s not a fact-it’s an inference Is framed as a generalization-the “moral of the story” They can be overarching or topical.
    • Tips on framing EUs
    • Tips on framing EUs You can think of an EU as beginning with “The student will understand that…”-but don’t write it in the
    • Tips on framing EUs You can think of an EU as beginning with “The student will understand that…”-but don’t write it in the Beware of stating an EU as a truism or vague generality.
    • Tips on framing EUs You can think of an EU as beginning with “The student will understand that…”-but don’t write it in the Beware of stating an EU as a truism or vague generality. Triangles have three sides. Musicians work with sounds to create music. The US has many different immigrant groups.
    • Tips on framing EUs You can think of an EU as beginning with “The student will understand that…”-but don’t write it in the Beware of stating an EU as a truism or vague generality. Triangles have three sides. Musicians work with sounds to create music. The US has many different immigrant groups. Do not think of the EU beginning with “The student will understand how to…” This will result in a skill.
    • Which of the following are EUs?
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times.
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times. One should not cup their hands when they are swimming the freestyle.
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times. One should not cup their hands when they are swimming the freestyle. The interaction of heredity and experience influences behavior.
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times. One should not cup their hands when they are swimming the freestyle. The interaction of heredity and experience influences behavior. How to tell time.
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times. One should not cup their hands when they are swimming the freestyle. The interaction of heredity and experience influences behavior. How to tell time. The causes and effects of the Civil War.
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times. One should not cup their hands when they are swimming the freestyle. The interaction of heredity and experience influences behavior. How to tell time. The causes and effects of the Civil War. History involves interpretation; historians can and do disagree.
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times. One should not cup their hands when they are swimming the freestyle. The interaction of heredity and experience influences behavior. How to tell time. The causes and effects of the Civil War. History involves interpretation; historians can and do disagree. Musicians’ work reflects period culture.
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times. One should not cup their hands when they are swimming the freestyle. The interaction of heredity and experience influences behavior. How to tell time. The causes and effects of the Civil War. History involves interpretation; historians can and do disagree. Musicians’ work reflects period culture. Cultural practices play an important role in protection of natural resources.
    • Which of the following are EUs? True friendship is revealed during difficult times, not happy times. One should not cup their hands when they are swimming the freestyle. The interaction of heredity and experience influences behavior. How to tell time. The causes and effects of the Civil War. History involves interpretation; historians can and do disagree. Musicians’ work reflects period culture. Cultural practices play an important role in protection of natural resources. A profitable business must have an organized business plan.
    • Checking out exemplary EUs Workbook p. 108-110
    • EU’s Let’s try to write a couple
    • Essential Questions
    • Essential Questions Have no simple right answer-meant to be argued.
    • Essential Questions Have no simple right answer-meant to be argued. Often address the conceptual foundations of a discipline.
    • Essential Questions Have no simple right answer-meant to be argued. Often address the conceptual foundations of a discipline. Raise other important questions.
    • Essential Questions Have no simple right answer-meant to be argued. Often address the conceptual foundations of a discipline. Raise other important questions. Stimulate rethinking
    • Tips on framing EQs
    • Tips on framing EQs Organize your unit around them.
    • Tips on framing EQs Organize your unit around them. Write reasonable amount of them per unit, perhaps 2-5.
    • Tips on framing EQs Organize your unit around them. Write reasonable amount of them per unit, perhaps 2-5. Frame them in understandable language for the age that you are teaching.
    • Tips on framing EQs Organize your unit around them. Write reasonable amount of them per unit, perhaps 2-5. Frame them in understandable language for the age that you are teaching. Sequence them so they lead naturally from one to another.
    • Which of the following are EQs?
    • Which of the following are EQs? How many legs does a spider have?
    • Which of the following are EQs? How many legs does a spider have? What is foreshadowing?
    • Which of the following are EQs? How many legs does a spider have? What is foreshadowing? How do effective writers hook and hold their readers?
    • Which of the following are EQs? How many legs does a spider have? What is foreshadowing? How do effective writers hook and hold their readers? What is original meaning of the word “technology”, from its Greek roots?
    • Which of the following are EQs? How many legs does a spider have? What is foreshadowing? How do effective writers hook and hold their readers? What is original meaning of the word “technology”, from its Greek roots? How would life be different if we couldn’t measure time?
    • Overarching vs. Topical EQs and EUs
    • Overarching vs. Topical EQs and EUs Overarching Point beyond the unit into larger EUs and Big Ideas Specific unit stuff is not mentioned. Deal with bigger issues.
    • Overarching vs. Topical EQs and EUs Overarching Point beyond the unit into larger EUs and Big Ideas Specific unit stuff is not mentioned. Deal with bigger issues. Topical More subject and topic specific.
    • Great EQ’s:
    • Great EQ’s: Overarching:
    • Great EQ’s: Overarching: In what ways does art reflect culture as well as shape it?
    • Great EQ’s: Overarching: In what ways does art reflect culture as well as shape it? What makes a great story?
    • Great EQ’s: Overarching: In what ways does art reflect culture as well as shape it? What makes a great story? How do governments balance the rights of individuals with the common good?
    • Great EQ’s: Overarching: In what ways does art reflect culture as well as shape it? What makes a great story? How do governments balance the rights of individuals with the common good? What is healthful living?
    • Great EQ’s: Overarching: In what ways does art reflect culture as well as shape it? What makes a great story? How do governments balance the rights of individuals with the common good? What is healthful living? Who is a winner?
    • Great EQ’s: Overarching: In what ways does art reflect culture as well as shape it? What makes a great story? How do governments balance the rights of individuals with the common good? What is healthful living? Who is a winner? How are sounds and silence organized in various musical forms?
    • Great EQ’s: Topical: What is unique about the mystery genre? How do insects survive when their environment changes? Does separate of powers create deadlock?
    • Checking out exemplary EQ’s In the workbook: p. 89-90
    • Trying your hand at writing some EQ’s Learning to Learn (big idea) What student behaviors (or learning strategies) are necessary to be a successful learner? How can a student meet his or her needs and still respect the group? What does a good (and poor) learner look like? When is it most appropriate to display proper manners?
    • Standards
    • Standards What are they?
    • Standards What are they? Why do we have them?
    • Standards What are they? Why do we have them? Where did they originate?
    • Standards What are they? Why do we have them? Where did they originate? The parallel with the doctor’s physical We don’t practice for our physical any more than we should practice directly for the state exam
    • Professional Organizations and Standards
    • Professional Organizations and Standards MATH: NCTM Standards-1989-where it all began.
    • Professional Organizations and Standards MATH: NCTM Standards-1989-where it all began. SCIENCE: AAAS-Assn. for the Adv, of Science-Project 2061. NRC (National Research Council) published in 1996. NSTA- published document in 1995.
    • Professional Organizations and Standards MATH: NCTM Standards-1989-where it all began. SCIENCE: AAAS-Assn. for the Adv, of Science-Project 2061. NRC (National Research Council) published in 1996. NSTA- published document in 1995. SOCIAL STUDIES: History Standards Project in 1995. Controversy between history and social studies people. CIVICS: Center for Civic Education-1994. ECON: National Council on Econ. Ed.: 1997. GEOGRAPHY: 1994 from the Geog. Ed. Standards Project. SS-NCSS 1994
    • Professional Organizations and Standards MATH: NCTM Standards-1989-where it all began. SCIENCE: AAAS-Assn. for the Adv, of Science-Project 2061. NRC (National Research Council) published in 1996. NSTA- published document in 1995. SOCIAL STUDIES: History Standards Project in 1995. Controversy between history and social studies people. CIVICS: Center for Civic Education-1994. ECON: National Council on Econ. Ed.: 1997. GEOGRAPHY: 1994 from the Geog. Ed. Standards Project. SS-NCSS 1994 ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS: NCTE and IRA Standards in Oct. 1995
    • …continued
    • …continued ARTS: Consortium of National Arts Educ. Associations: 1994
    • …continued ARTS: Consortium of National Arts Educ. Associations: 1994 FOREIGN LANGUAGES: American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages 1996.
    • …continued ARTS: Consortium of National Arts Educ. Associations: 1994 FOREIGN LANGUAGES: American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages 1996. HEALTH: Joint Comm. On National Health Education Standards-1994
    • …continued ARTS: Consortium of National Arts Educ. Associations: 1994 FOREIGN LANGUAGES: American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages 1996. HEALTH: Joint Comm. On National Health Education Standards-1994 P.E.: NASPE (Nat. Assn. for Sport and P.E.; 1995
    • Knowledge Vocab Terms Definitions Key factual info Formulas Critical details Important events and people
    • Skills Basic skills, e.g. decoding, arithmetic computation Communication skills, e.g. listening, speaking, writing Thinking skills, e.g. compare, infer, analyze, interpret Research, inquiry, investigation skills
    • Sutter's Mill * by Dan Fogelberg In the Spring of Forty-seven, So the story, it is told, Old John Sutter went to the mill site Found a piece of shining gold. Well, he took it to the city Where the word, like wildfire, spread. And old John Sutter soon came to wish he'd Left that stone in the river bed. For they came like herds of locusts Every woman, child and man In their lumbering Conestogas They left their tracks upon the land. (Chorus) Some would fail and some would prosper Some would die and some would kill Some would thank the Lord for their deliverance And some would curse John Sutter's Mill. Well, they came from New York City, And they came from Alabam' With their dreams of finding fortunes In this wild unsettled land. Well, some fell prey to hostile arrows As they tried to cross the plains. And some were lost in the Rocky Mountains With their hands froze to the reins. Oh... (Chorus) Well, some pushed on to California And others stopped to take their rest. And by the Spring of Eighteen-sixty They had opened up the west. And then the railroad came behind them And the land was plowed and tamed, When Old John Sutter went to meet his maker, He'd not one penny to his name. Oh...
    • Putting it All Together John Sutter’s Mill-context for putting it all together Utilize the theme of "John Sutter's Mill" and design Stage 1 unit as a group skeleton unit. At least 2-3 EUs and EQs...
    • Work on Stage 1
    • Stage 2
    • The 3 stages
    • The 3 stages Stage 1: Identifying desired results
    • The 3 stages Stage 1: Identifying desired results STAGE 2: DETERMINING ACCEPTABLE EVIDENCE TO ASSESS AND EVALUATE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT OF DESIRED RESULTS
    • The 3 stages Stage 1: Identifying desired results STAGE 2: DETERMINING ACCEPTABLE EVIDENCE TO ASSESS AND EVALUATE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT OF DESIRED RESULTS Stage 3: Designing learning activities to promote student mastery and success on assessment tasks.
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective?
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What is comprehensive classroom and school assessment?
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What is comprehensive classroom and school assessment? How does one "think like an assessor"?
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What is comprehensive classroom and school assessment? How does one "think like an assessor"? What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective?
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What is comprehensive classroom and school assessment? How does one "think like an assessor"? What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What are the important elements of Stage 2?
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What is comprehensive classroom and school assessment? How does one "think like an assessor"? What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What are the important elements of Stage 2? What are the latest assessment techniques schools are using?
    • Stage 2 Demanding Q’s What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What is comprehensive classroom and school assessment? How does one "think like an assessor"? What are the critical elements of assessment from a school perspective? What are the important elements of Stage 2? What are the latest assessment techniques schools are using? How can my students and I "change the world" through performance assessments?
    • Go into any sports bar and ask, "Who's the best active major league baseball player?" In the ensuing argument, you'll hear about the quality of a catcher's defensive play or the leadership he brings to the team. You'll hear a bunch of numbers, too, from home runs to batting averages to errors, and arguments over which numbers are more significant. The truth is that any sports fan knows that no one statistic can capture a player's entire career -- even the tables of fine print on the back of every baseball card cannot entirely
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment You’re not generating grades.
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need?
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need? Think like an assessor, not an activity designer.
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need? Think like an assessor, not an activity designer. Snapshot to scrapbook
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need? Think like an assessor, not an activity designer. Snapshot to scrapbook Authentic whenever possible
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need? Think like an assessor, not an activity designer. Snapshot to scrapbook Authentic whenever possible Use 6 facets when designing assessments and be sure the assessment align with EQs and EUs.
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment
    • Some basic rules regarding assessment Designing around problems: John Dewey: “Does the question naturally suggest itself within some situation or personal experience? Or is it an aloof thing…? Is it the sort of thing that would arouse conversation and engage experimentation out side of school? Or is it made a problem for the pupil only because he cannot get the required mark or be promoted or win the teacher’s approval
    • Whatcha’ think? The primary purpose of classroom assessment is to inform teaching and improve learning, not to sort and select students or to justify a grade. Jay McTigue and Steve Ferrara from Assessing Learning in the Classroom
    • The big idea for Assessment
    • The big idea for Assessment The evidence should be credible & helpful.
    • The big idea for Assessment The evidence should be credible & helpful. Implications: the assessments should –
    • The big idea for Assessment The evidence should be credible & helpful. Implications: the assessments should – Be grounded in real-world applications, supplemented as needed by more traditional school evidence
    • The big idea for Assessment The evidence should be credible & helpful. Implications: the assessments should – Be grounded in real-world applications, supplemented as needed by more traditional school evidence Provide useful feedback to the learner, be transparent, and minimize secrecy
    • The big idea for Assessment The evidence should be credible & helpful. Implications: the assessments should – Be grounded in real-world applications, supplemented as needed by more traditional school evidence Provide useful feedback to the learner, be transparent, and minimize secrecy Be valid, reliable - aligned with the desired results of Stage 1 (and fair)
    • Reliability: Snapshot vs. Photo Album We need patterns that overcome inherent measurement error Sound assessment (particularly of State Standards) requires multiple evidence over time - a photo album vs. a single snapshot
    • For Reliability & Sufficiency:
    • For Reliability & Sufficiency: Varied types, over time: authentic tasks and projects academic exam questions, prompts, and problems quizzes and test items informal checks for understanding student self-assessments
    • Ways to measure student learning
    • Ways to measure student learning Standardized tests Norm-referenced, criterion referenced
    • Ways to measure student learning Standardized tests Norm-referenced, criterion referenced Authentic assessments
    • Ways to measure student learning Standardized tests Norm-referenced, criterion referenced Authentic assessments Teacher-made test
    • Ways to measure student learning Standardized tests Norm-referenced, criterion referenced Authentic assessments Teacher-made test Teacher-assigned grades
    • Ways to measure student learning Standardized tests Norm-referenced, criterion referenced Authentic assessments Teacher-made test Teacher-assigned grades Performance assessments
    • Ways to measure student learning Standardized tests Norm-referenced, criterion referenced Authentic assessments Teacher-made test Teacher-assigned grades Performance assessments Standards based assessments
    • Ways to measure student learning Standardized tests Norm-referenced, criterion referenced Authentic assessments Teacher-made test Teacher-assigned grades Performance assessments Standards based assessments Diagnostic testing
    • Norm-referenced Tests Compares test performance of a school, group, or individual with the performance of a norming group (e.g. CAT, Iowa)
    • Criterion-Referenced tests Compares individuals performance to a set of standards and not to the performance of other test takers. (e.g. NHEIAP, NECAP)
    • Diagnostic Tests Tests given to students to know the nature of a student’s difficulty but not necessary the cause of that difficulty.(e.g. Sped testing)
    • Performance Assessments (p. 167+) Measures skill and knowledge directly, e.g. if you want students to learn to write, assess it on a writing assignment Advantages: measures process, can match state standards, is a learning tool in and of itself, provides reflection for students...
    • Working on and Sharing PTs
    • GRASPS
    • GRASPS G=Goals from the real world.
    • GRASPS G=Goals from the real world. R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality.
    • GRASPS G=Goals from the real world. R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality. A=Audiences to whom students will present final products and performances
    • GRASPS G=Goals from the real world. R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality. A=Audiences to whom students will present final products and performances S=Situations involving a real-world conflict to be resolved, decision to be made, investigation to be completed
    • GRASPS G=Goals from the real world. R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality. A=Audiences to whom students will present final products and performances S=Situations involving a real-world conflict to be resolved, decision to be made, investigation to be completed P=Products and Performances culminating from the study
    • GRASPS G=Goals from the real world. R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality. A=Audiences to whom students will present final products and performances S=Situations involving a real-world conflict to be resolved, decision to be made, investigation to be completed P=Products and Performances culminating from the study S=Standards for evaluating project-based products and performances
    • General guidelines for Assessment
    • General guidelines for Assessment We need to look at more than just objective tests to assess knowledge and skill
    • General guidelines for Assessment We need to look at more than just objective tests to assess knowledge and skill How do we design performances that enable us to make precise judgment about the different parts of the performance?
    • General guidelines for Assessment We need to look at more than just objective tests to assess knowledge and skill How do we design performances that enable us to make precise judgment about the different parts of the performance? Try to have parallel versions of the same content across different assessment formats.
    • General guidelines for Assessment We need to look at more than just objective tests to assess knowledge and skill How do we design performances that enable us to make precise judgment about the different parts of the performance? Try to have parallel versions of the same content across different assessment formats. Given that a single application or product may or may not link to larger goals, ask students to “show their work”, give reasons for answers and show connections to larger ideas in the answers.
    • Assessment from a School or District Perspective
    • What are the critical elements of
    • What are the critical elements of Secured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria.
    • What are the critical elements of Secured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria. Classroom embedded Assessments Coming out of classroom activities
    • What are the critical elements of Secured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria. Classroom embedded Assessments Coming out of classroom activities Composite Records Best Works Portfolios (managed by students) Progress Portfolios (managed by teachers)
    • Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions
    • Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions Program and Curriculum Development Making decisions on programs
    • Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions Program and Curriculum Development Making decisions on programs Child Specific Making decisions about children
    • Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions Program and Curriculum Development Making decisions on programs Child Specific Making decisions about children School Climate Making decisions about school climate
    • An Assessment Philosophy
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn.
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn. Assessment drives instruction for every student.
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn. Assessment drives instruction for every student. Assessment addresses the process and the product.
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn. Assessment drives instruction for every student. Assessment addresses the process and the product. Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and on going (e.g. observation and anecdotal records
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn. Assessment drives instruction for every student. Assessment addresses the process and the product. Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and on going (e.g. observation and anecdotal records Assessment must be developmentally appropriate.
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn. Assessment drives instruction for every student. Assessment addresses the process and the product. Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and on going (e.g. observation and anecdotal records Assessment must be developmentally appropriate. Assessment exists in multiple forms.
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn. Assessment drives instruction for every student. Assessment addresses the process and the product. Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and on going (e.g. observation and anecdotal records Assessment must be developmentally appropriate. Assessment exists in multiple forms. Assessment is used to evaluate programs and individual student progress.
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn. Assessment drives instruction for every student. Assessment addresses the process and the product. Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and on going (e.g. observation and anecdotal records Assessment must be developmentally appropriate. Assessment exists in multiple forms. Assessment is used to evaluate programs and individual student progress. Assessment honors a “value-added” approach.
    • An Assessment Philosophy Assessment values what is taught and what students learn. Assessment drives instruction for every student. Assessment addresses the process and the product. Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and on going (e.g. observation and anecdotal records Assessment must be developmentally appropriate. Assessment exists in multiple forms. Assessment is used to evaluate programs and individual student progress. Assessment honors a “value-added” approach. Assessment enables student progress and program effectiveness to be shared with the educational community.
    • ASSESSMENT MATRIX * HOPKINTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 2005-0 6 GRADE ASSESSMENT DESCRIPTION K Observation Survey An early literacy assessment that assesses the following: • Text Reading Level • Letter Identification • Concepts About Print o D e m onstrate understanding of concepts about book handling and conventions of printed language while teacher reads a book • Word Test o Read a list of 20 words • Writing Vocabulary o S t u dent has 10 minutes to write all the words he/she knows • Hearing and Recording Sounds in Words o S t u dent writes a dictated sentence which is scored by the number of sounds hea r d Write Traits Writing Assesses six important “traits” of writing: * Idea Development Benchmark * Organization * Voice * Word Choice * Sentence Fluency * Conventions 1 DRA • The Developmental Reading Assessment provides teachers with a method for assessing and documenting students' development as readers over time within a literature-based instructional reading program. • The DRA is designed to be used in elementary classrooms with rich literate environments. • The assessments are conducted during one-on-one reading conferences as children read specially selected assessment texts. A set of 20 stories, which
    • 2 DRA See above Write Traits Writing See above Benchmark MAP testing in The NWEA (Northwest Evaluation Association) MAP test provides teachers and Reading and Math parents with a standardized assessment of a student’s ability. You can receive significant results the same day (and much more not long after) and use the information to drive your instruction. The test is taken by students on the computer. This assessment is given both in the fall and spring. 3 DRA See above Write Traits Writing See above Benchmark MAP testing in See above Reading and Math NECAP State assessment in Math and Reading/Language Arts-tested in the fall 4 DRA See above Write Traits Writing See above Benchmark MAP testing in See above Reading and Math NECAP State assessment in Math and Reading/Language Arts-tested in the fall NAEP National Assessment of Educational Progress-known as the “Nation’s Report Card”. 5 DRA See above Write Traits Writing See above Benchmark MAP testing in See above Reading and Math NECAP State Assessment in Math, Reading/Language Arts, and in Writing-tested in the fall
    • 10 Selected MAP Primarily for Math IIs. testing NHEIAP State Assessment in Math and Reading/Language Arts-tested in the spring PSAT/NMSQT PSAT/NMSQT stands for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. It's a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT. World Language Assessment 11 SAT The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is a standard submission test that is used by colleges around the country to help identify students who will succeed at a given college. Subject Tests (SAT Subject Tests (formerly SAT II: Subject Tests) are designed to measure student II) knowledge and skills in particular subject areas, as well as the ability to apply that knowledge. Advanced Taken by students in A.P. courses in order to receive college credit. Placement Tests PSAT/NMSQT PSAT/NMSQT stands for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. It's a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT. It also provides an opportunity for National Merit scholarship programs. ACT The ACT assesses high school students' general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. World Language Assessment
    • Lexiles A system for measuring the difficulty of text. Reading reports give Lexile scores Check out Lexile.com
    • Uses of MAP data
    • Uses of MAP data Benchmarking student performance in reading and math
    • Uses of MAP data Benchmarking student performance in reading and math Entry points of DI in reading and math
    • Uses of MAP data Benchmarking student performance in reading and math Entry points of DI in reading and math Identification of PD for school/teachers
    • Uses of MAP data Benchmarking student performance in reading and math Entry points of DI in reading and math Identification of PD for school/teachers Construction of IEP goals and objectives
    • Uses of MAP data Benchmarking student performance in reading and math Entry points of DI in reading and math Identification of PD for school/teachers Construction of IEP goals and objectives Cross comparison data with reading benchmarks
    • Uses of MAP data Benchmarking student performance in reading and math Entry points of DI in reading and math Identification of PD for school/teachers Construction of IEP goals and objectives Cross comparison data with reading benchmarks Selection of readability levels
    • Uses of MAP data Benchmarking student performance in reading and math Entry points of DI in reading and math Identification of PD for school/teachers Construction of IEP goals and objectives Cross comparison data with reading benchmarks Selection of readability levels Conversation starters with parents, especially at parent conferences
    • Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decision
    • Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decision Used in RTI decisions, pre-referral meetings, Child Study
    • Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decision Used in RTI decisions, pre-referral meetings, Child Study Part of criteria to support admission to enrichment reading
    • Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decision Used in RTI decisions, pre-referral meetings, Child Study Part of criteria to support admission to enrichment reading Conversation at PD planning meetings with Principal and teacher.
    • Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decision Used in RTI decisions, pre-referral meetings, Child Study Part of criteria to support admission to enrichment reading Conversation at PD planning meetings with Principal and teacher. Part of the placement puzzle
    • If time…the Qualitative side of Assessment-Digital Portfolios
    • STAGE 3 Planning for Learning
    • Basics of Stage 3
    • Basics of Stage 3 EQ’s: What do learners need, given the desired results? What is the best use of time spent in and out of the classroom, given the performance goals?
    • Basics of Stage 3 EQ’s: What do learners need, given the desired results? What is the best use of time spent in and out of the classroom, given the performance goals? Think less about the teachings and more about the learnings. What does this mean?
    • Basics of Stage 3 EQ’s: What do learners need, given the desired results? What is the best use of time spent in and out of the classroom, given the performance goals? Think less about the teachings and more about the learnings. What does this mean? Ongoing assessment is crucial.
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan?
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals Hands-on approach
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals Hands-on approach Focus on interesting and important ideas, questions, issues, problems
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals Hands-on approach Focus on interesting and important ideas, questions, issues, problems Real world applications; “change the world!”
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals Hands-on approach Focus on interesting and important ideas, questions, issues, problems Real world applications; “change the world!” Powerful feedback; trial and error
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals Hands-on approach Focus on interesting and important ideas, questions, issues, problems Real world applications; “change the world!” Powerful feedback; trial and error Personalized approach (D.I., M.I.), Variety in methods, grouping, tasks
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals Hands-on approach Focus on interesting and important ideas, questions, issues, problems Real world applications; “change the world!” Powerful feedback; trial and error Personalized approach (D.I., M.I.), Variety in methods, grouping, tasks Clear models and modeling
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals Hands-on approach Focus on interesting and important ideas, questions, issues, problems Real world applications; “change the world!” Powerful feedback; trial and error Personalized approach (D.I., M.I.), Variety in methods, grouping, tasks Clear models and modeling Time set aside for reflection
    • What are the best components of a good lesson plan? Clear performance goals Hands-on approach Focus on interesting and important ideas, questions, issues, problems Real world applications; “change the world!” Powerful feedback; trial and error Personalized approach (D.I., M.I.), Variety in methods, grouping, tasks Clear models and modeling Time set aside for reflection Safe environment for taking risks
    • WHERETO
    • WHERETO W: Ensure that students understand WHERE the unit is headed and WHY
    • WHERETO W: Ensure that students understand WHERE the unit is headed and WHY H: HOOK students in the beginning and HOLD their attention throughout
    • WHERETO W: Ensure that students understand WHERE the unit is headed and WHY H: HOOK students in the beginning and HOLD their attention throughout E: EQUIP students with necessary experiences, tools, knowledge to meet performance goals
    • WHERETO W: Ensure that students understand WHERE the unit is headed and WHY H: HOOK students in the beginning and HOLD their attention throughout E: EQUIP students with necessary experiences, tools, knowledge to meet performance goals R: Provide students with opportunities to RETHINK, REFLECT, and REVISE
    • WHERETO W: Ensure that students understand WHERE the unit is headed and WHY H: HOOK students in the beginning and HOLD their attention throughout E: EQUIP students with necessary experiences, tools, knowledge to meet performance goals R: Provide students with opportunities to RETHINK, REFLECT, and REVISE E: Build in opportunities for students to EVALUATE progress and self-assess
    • WHERETO W: Ensure that students understand WHERE the unit is headed and WHY H: HOOK students in the beginning and HOLD their attention throughout E: EQUIP students with necessary experiences, tools, knowledge to meet performance goals R: Provide students with opportunities to RETHINK, REFLECT, and REVISE E: Build in opportunities for students to EVALUATE progress and self-assess T: Be TAILORED to reflect individual talents, interests.
    • THE HOOK
    • THE HOOK Often the first activity.
    • THE HOOK Often the first activity. This motivates and interests the students.
    • THE HOOK Often the first activity. This motivates and interests the students. May be unusual, even outlandish.
    • THE HOOK Often the first activity. This motivates and interests the students. May be unusual, even outlandish. An activity that you will come back to often during the course of the unit.
    • WHO AM I AS A LEARNER?
    • What is my learning style?
    • What is my learning style?
    • Teaching Modalities Auditory Visual Kinesthetic
    • What is Differentiation? It is “classroom practice that looks eyeball to eyeball with the reality that kids differ, and the most effective teachers do whatever it takes to hook the whole range of kids on learning. -Tomlinson (2001)
    • Comment from a course eval written by a 7th “I like this class because there’s something different going on all the time. My other classes, it’s like peanut butter for lunch every single day. This class, it’s like my teacher really knows how to cook. It’s like she runs a really good restaurant with a big menu and all.”
    • Differentiation is a synthesis of what research has taught us about how students learn best and how best to teach them . Curriculum and Instruction Educational Psychology Brain Research Motivation Best Teaching Practices from Special Ed Reading Gifted Education Etc.
    • Through a variety of inst. strategies MI Jigsaw Organizers Varied Texts Lit Circles Learning Contracts Small Group Instruction Independent Study Questioning strategies Interest centers Varied homework Compacting
    • What should be diff. in a UbD unit?
    • What should be diff. in a UbD unit? NOT DIFF.: Established goals, EU’s and EQ’s;
    • What should be diff. in a UbD unit? NOT DIFF.: Established goals, EU’s and EQ’s; DIFF: Performance Tasks, Other evidence, Lessons.
    • What should be diff. in a UbD unit? NOT DIFF.: Established goals, EU’s and EQ’s; DIFF: Performance Tasks, Other evidence, Lessons. PERHAPS DIFF.: Knowledge and Skills
    • Teaching Method/Retention ME) (from National Training Labs; Bethel TEACHING METHOD RETENTION RATE Lecture 5% Reading 10% Audio-Visual 20% Demonstration 30% Discussion Group 50% Practice by Doing 75% Teach Others-Immediate Use of Learning 90%
    • Key Principles of A Diff. Classroom from The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson
    • Key Principles of A Diff. Classroom from The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson The teacher is clear about what matters in subject matter.
    • Key Principles of A Diff. Classroom from The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson The teacher is clear about what matters in subject matter. The teacher understands, appreciates, and builds upon student differences.
    • Key Principles of A Diff. Classroom from The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson The teacher is clear about what matters in subject matter. The teacher understands, appreciates, and builds upon student differences. Assessment and Instruction are inseparable.
    • Key Principles of A Diff. Classroom from The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson The teacher is clear about what matters in subject matter. The teacher understands, appreciates, and builds upon student differences. Assessment and Instruction are inseparable. The teacher adjusts content, process and product in response to student readiness, interests, and learning profile.
    • Key Principles of A Diff. Classroom from The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson The teacher is clear about what matters in subject matter. The teacher understands, appreciates, and builds upon student differences. Assessment and Instruction are inseparable. The teacher adjusts content, process and product in response to student readiness, interests, and learning profile. All students participate in respectful work.
    • Key Principles of A Diff. Classroom from The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson The teacher is clear about what matters in subject matter. The teacher understands, appreciates, and builds upon student differences. Assessment and Instruction are inseparable. The teacher adjusts content, process and product in response to student readiness, interests, and learning profile. All students participate in respectful work. Students and teachers are collaborators in learning.
    • Key Principles of A Diff. Classroom from The Differentiated Classroom by Carol Ann Tomlinson The teacher is clear about what matters in subject matter. The teacher understands, appreciates, and builds upon student differences. Assessment and Instruction are inseparable. The teacher adjusts content, process and product in response to student readiness, interests, and learning profile. All students participate in respectful work. Students and teachers are collaborators in learning. Goals of a diff. classroom are maximum growth and individual success.
    • Final Thoughts Borrow what makes sense from UbD-what can you immediately put into practice? Call or email anytime: wcarozza@hopkintonschools.org Harold Martin School: 746-3473 This PowerPoint will be on: http:// wcarozza.wikispaces.com/