Cn 11 12-12

383 views

Published on

Here are the notes from the CIS class on 11-12.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
383
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Cn 11 12-12

    1. 1. Class Notes 11-12-12
    2. 2. DQs:
    3. 3. DQs: What are the important elements of Stage 2?
    4. 4. DQs: What are the important elements of Stage 2? How does one “think like an assessor”?
    5. 5. DQs: What are the important elements of Stage 2? How does one “think like an assessor”? What is evidence of desired results? (alignment with Stage 1)
    6. 6. DQs: What are the important elements of Stage 2? How does one “think like an assessor”? What is evidence of desired results? (alignment with Stage 1) What is evidence of UNDERSTANDING?
    7. 7. DQs: What are the important elements of Stage 2? How does one “think like an assessor”? What is evidence of desired results? (alignment with Stage 1) What is evidence of UNDERSTANDING? How can my students and I "change the world" through performance assessments?
    8. 8. DQs: What are the important elements of Stage 2? How does one “think like an assessor”? What is evidence of desired results? (alignment with Stage 1) What is evidence of UNDERSTANDING? How can my students and I "change the world" through performance assessments? What does assessment look like school and district wide?
    9. 9. DQs: What are the important elements of Stage 2? How does one “think like an assessor”? What is evidence of desired results? (alignment with Stage 1) What is evidence of UNDERSTANDING? How can my students and I "change the world" through performance assessments? What does assessment look like school and district wide? How can I organize what work is left?
    10. 10. Summary of the rest...November 12-Finish up on Stage 2November 19-Stage 3November 26-Work session-wrap up weekDecember 3 and 10: Presentations
    11. 11. STAGE TWO Determining acceptable evidence Thinking Like an Assessor
    12. 12. Stages of Backward Design
    13. 13. Stages of Backward Design Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives).
    14. 14. Stages of Backward Design Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives). Stage Two: Determining acceptable evidence to assess and to evaluate student achievement of desired results.
    15. 15. Stages of Backward Design Stage One: Identifying desired results (such as enduring understandings, essential questions and knowledge objectives). Stage Two: Determining acceptable evidence to assess and to evaluate student achievement of desired results. Stage Three: Designing learning activities to promote student mastery and success on assessment tasks.
    16. 16. 3 Basic Questions in order to thinklike an assessor:
    17. 17. 3 Basic Questions in order to thinklike an assessor: What evidence?
    18. 18. 3 Basic Questions in order to thinklike an assessor: What evidence? What tasks?
    19. 19. 3 Basic Questions in order to thinklike an assessor: What evidence? What tasks? Does Stage 2 align with Stage 1?
    20. 20. Not a natural process -as we arefocused on what are the results?
    21. 21. Not a natural process -as we arefocused on what are the results? See figure 7.3 on p. 151.
    22. 22. Not a natural process -as we arefocused on what are the results? See figure 7.3 on p. 151. The UbD template “short circuits” the tendency to think like “an activity designer.”
    23. 23. From snapshot to scrapbook
    24. 24. From snapshot to scrapbook Figure 7.4 and 7.5, pages 152-3.
    25. 25. From snapshot to scrapbook Figure 7.4 and 7.5, pages 152-3. What types of assessments are there?
    26. 26. Some basic rules regardingassessment
    27. 27. Some basic rules regardingassessment You’re not generating grades.
    28. 28. Some basic rules regardingassessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1
    29. 29. Some basic rules regardingassessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need?
    30. 30. Some basic rules regardingassessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need? Think like an assessor, not an activity designer.
    31. 31. Some basic rules regardingassessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need? Think like an assessor, not an activity designer. Snapshot to scrapbook
    32. 32. Some basic rules regardingassessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need? Think like an assessor, not an activity designer. Snapshot to scrapbook Authentic whenever possible
    33. 33. Some basic rules regardingassessment You’re not generating grades. Align assessment with Stage 1 Ask yourself: What kinds of evidence do we need? Think like an assessor, not an activity designer. Snapshot to scrapbook Authentic whenever possible Use 6 facets when designing assessments and be sure the assessment align with EQs and EUs.
    34. 34. The Performance Task
    35. 35. The Performance Task Designing around problems: John Dewey: “Does the question naturally suggest itself within some situation or personal experience? Or is it an aloof thing…? Is it the sort of thing that would arouse conversation and engage experimentation out side of school? Or is it made a problem for the pupil only because he cannot get the required mark or be promoted or win the teacher’s approval unless he deals with it? (1916)
    36. 36. GRASPS
    37. 37. GRASPSG=Goals from the real world.
    38. 38. GRASPSG=Goals from the real world.R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality.
    39. 39. GRASPSG=Goals from the real world.R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality.A=Audiences to whom students will present final productsand performances
    40. 40. GRASPSG=Goals from the real world.R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality.A=Audiences to whom students will present final productsand performancesS=Situations involving a real-world conflict to be resolved,decision to be made, investigation to be completed
    41. 41. GRASPSG=Goals from the real world.R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality.A=Audiences to whom students will present final productsand performancesS=Situations involving a real-world conflict to be resolved,decision to be made, investigation to be completedP=Products and Performances culminating from the study
    42. 42. GRASPSG=Goals from the real world.R=Roles that are authentic and based in reality.A=Audiences to whom students will present final productsand performancesS=Situations involving a real-world conflict to be resolved,decision to be made, investigation to be completedP=Products and Performances culminating from the studyS=Standards for evaluating project-based products andperformances
    43. 43. Work for the weekWork for the week-both classwork and homework: Listen to the Podcast and follow along with slides. Be sure to watch the NYC Urban Academy video. After watching “Teaching 2030”, describe in your own words the five major points the group makes. Make a Google Doc and share with Bill. (wcarozza@nec.edu) Read Chapter 7 in the text-Thinking Like an Assessor Develop a GRASPS-share a Google Doc with Bill similar to the blank one on p. 172 in workbook.
    44. 44. GRASPS-Performance TaskLet’s share.
    45. 45. An exemplary GRASPS with EQs and EUs
    46. 46. Looking at Assessmentfrom a School or District Perspective
    47. 47. General guidelines for Assessment
    48. 48. General guidelines for Assessment tests to assessWe need to look at more than just objectiveknowledge and skill.
    49. 49. General guidelines for Assessment tests to assessWe need to look at more than just objectiveknowledge and skill.How do we design performances that enable us to makeprecise judgment about the different parts of theperformance?
    50. 50. General guidelines for Assessment tests to assessWe need to look at more than just objectiveknowledge and skill.How do we design performances that enable us to makeprecise judgment about the different parts of theperformance?Try to have parallel versions of the same content acrossdifferent assessment formats.
    51. 51. General guidelines for Assessment tests to assessWe need to look at more than just objectiveknowledge and skill.How do we design performances that enable us to makeprecise judgment about the different parts of theperformance?Try to have parallel versions of the same content acrossdifferent assessment formats.Given that a single application or product may or may notlink to larger goals, ask students to “show their work”, givereasons for answers and show connections to larger ideas inthe answers.
    52. 52. Three Broad Types of Assessment
    53. 53. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments
    54. 54. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA
    55. 55. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests
    56. 56. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers.
    57. 57. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria.
    58. 58. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria.Classroom embedded Assessments
    59. 59. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria.Classroom embedded Assessments Coming out of classroom activities (Stage 2)
    60. 60. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria.Classroom embedded Assessments Coming out of classroom activities (Stage 2)Composite Records
    61. 61. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria.Classroom embedded Assessments Coming out of classroom activities (Stage 2)Composite Records Best Works Portfolios (managed by students)
    62. 62. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria.Classroom embedded Assessments Coming out of classroom activities (Stage 2)Composite Records Best Works Portfolios (managed by students) Progress Portfolios (managed by teachers)
    63. 63. Three Broad Types of AssessmentSecured Assessments No help is given, e.g. NECAP, NWEA Norm Referenced vs. Criterion Referenced tests NRTs: classify students from high to low in large sample-compared to other peers. CRTs: student performance based against a criteria.Classroom embedded Assessments Coming out of classroom activities (Stage 2)Composite Records Best Works Portfolios (managed by students) Progress Portfolios (managed by teachers) Accountability Portfolios (e.g. KY and VT)
    64. 64. Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions-examples
    65. 65. Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions-examplesProgram and Curriculum Development
    66. 66. Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions-examplesProgram and Curriculum Development Making decisions on programs
    67. 67. Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions-examplesProgram and Curriculum Development Making decisions on programsChild Specific
    68. 68. Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions-examplesProgram and Curriculum Development Making decisions on programsChild Specific Making decisions about children
    69. 69. Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions-examplesProgram and Curriculum Development Making decisions on programsChild Specific Making decisions about childrenSchool Climate
    70. 70. Assessment within a school or district-making data driven decisions-examplesProgram and Curriculum Development Making decisions on programsChild Specific Making decisions about childrenSchool Climate Making decisions about school climate
    71. 71. An Assessment Philosophy
    72. 72. An Assessment PhilosophyAssessment values what is taught and what students learn.
    73. 73. An Assessment PhilosophyAssessment values what is taught and what students learn.Assessment drives instruction for every student.
    74. 74. An Assessment PhilosophyAssessment values what is taught and what students learn.Assessment drives instruction for every student.Assessment addresses the process and the product.
    75. 75. An Assessment PhilosophyAssessment values what is taught and what students learn.Assessment drives instruction for every student.Assessment addresses the process and the product.Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and ongoing (e.g. observation and anecdotal records
    76. 76. An Assessment PhilosophyAssessment values what is taught and what students learn.Assessment drives instruction for every student.Assessment addresses the process and the product.Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and ongoing (e.g. observation and anecdotal recordsAssessment must be developmentally appropriate.
    77. 77. An Assessment PhilosophyAssessment values what is taught and what students learn.Assessment drives instruction for every student.Assessment addresses the process and the product.Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and ongoing (e.g. observation and anecdotal recordsAssessment must be developmentally appropriate.Assessment exists in multiple forms.
    78. 78. An Assessment PhilosophyAssessment values what is taught and what students learn.Assessment drives instruction for every student.Assessment addresses the process and the product.Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and ongoing (e.g. observation and anecdotal recordsAssessment must be developmentally appropriate.Assessment exists in multiple forms.Assessment is used to evaluate programs and individual studentprogress.
    79. 79. An Assessment PhilosophyAssessment values what is taught and what students learn.Assessment drives instruction for every student.Assessment addresses the process and the product.Assessment is both formal (e.g. standardized or published tests) and ongoing (e.g. observation and anecdotal recordsAssessment must be developmentally appropriate.Assessment exists in multiple forms.Assessment is used to evaluate programs and individual studentprogress.Assessment honors a “value-added” approach.
    80. 80. ASSESSMENT MATRIX * HOPKINTON SCHOOL DISTRICT 2005-0 6GRADE ASSESSMENT DESCRIPTION K Observation Survey An early literacy assessment that assesses the following: • Text Reading Level • Letter Identification • Concepts About Print o D e m onstrate understanding of concepts about book handling and conventions of printed language while teacher reads a book • Word Test o Read a list of 20 words • Writing Vocabulary o S t u dent has 10 minutes to write all the words he/she knows • Hearing and Recording Sounds in Words o S t u dent writes a dictated sentence which is scored by the number of sounds hea r d Write Traits Writing Assesses six important “traits” of writing: * Idea Development Benchmark * Organization * Voice * Word Choice * Sentence Fluency * Conventions 1 DRA • The Developmental Reading Assessment provides teachers with a method for assessing and documenting students development as readers over time within a literature-based instructional reading program. • The DRA is designed to be used in elementary classrooms with rich literate environments. • The assessments are conducted during one-on-one reading conferences as children read specially selected assessment texts. A set of 20 stories, which
    81. 81. 2 DRA See above Write Traits Writing See above Benchmark MAP testing in The NWEA (Northwest Evaluation Association) MAP test provides teachers and Reading and Math parents with a standardized assessment of a student’s ability. You can receive significant results the same day (and much more not long after) and use the information to drive your instruction. The test is taken by students on the computer. This assessment is given both in the fall and spring.3 DRA See above Write Traits Writing See above Benchmark MAP testing in See above Reading and Math NECAP State assessment in Math and Reading/Language Arts-tested in the fall4 DRA See above Write Traits Writing See above Benchmark MAP testing in See above Reading and Math NECAP State assessment in Math and Reading/Language Arts-tested in the fall NAEP National Assessment of Educational Progress-known as the “Nation’s Report Card”.5 DRA See above Write Traits Writing See above Benchmark MAP testing in See above Reading and Math NECAP State Assessment in Math, Reading/Language Arts, and in Writing-tested in the fall
    82. 82. 10 Selected MAP Primarily for Math IIs. testing NHEIAP State Assessment in Math and Reading/Language Arts-tested in the spring PSAT/NMSQT PSAT/NMSQT stands for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. Its a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT. World Language Assessment11 SAT The Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is a standard submission test that is used by colleges around the country to help identify students who will succeed at a given college. Subject Tests (SAT Subject Tests (formerly SAT II: Subject Tests) are designed to measure student II) knowledge and skills in particular subject areas, as well as the ability to apply that knowledge. Advanced Taken by students in A.P. courses in order to receive college credit. Placement Tests PSAT/NMSQT PSAT/NMSQT stands for Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. Its a standardized test that provides firsthand practice for the SAT. It also provides an opportunity for National Merit scholarship programs. ACT The ACT assesses high school students general educational development and their ability to complete college-level work. World Language Assessment
    83. 83. MAP testingExamples from the Internet -Quantitative Assessment
    84. 84. Lexiles
    85. 85. LexilesA system for measuring the difficulty of text.
    86. 86. LexilesA system for measuring the difficulty of text.Reading reports give Lexile scores
    87. 87. LexilesA system for measuring the difficulty of text.Reading reports give Lexile scoresCheck out Lexile.com
    88. 88. Uses of MAP data
    89. 89. Uses of MAP dataBenchmarking student performance in reading and math
    90. 90. Uses of MAP dataBenchmarking student performance in reading and mathEntry points of DI in reading and math
    91. 91. Uses of MAP dataBenchmarking student performance in reading and mathEntry points of DI in reading and mathIdentification of PD for school/teachers
    92. 92. Uses of MAP dataBenchmarking student performance in reading and mathEntry points of DI in reading and mathIdentification of PD for school/teachersConstruction of IEP goals and objectives
    93. 93. Uses of MAP dataBenchmarking student performance in reading and mathEntry points of DI in reading and mathIdentification of PD for school/teachersConstruction of IEP goals and objectivesCross comparison data with reading benchmarks
    94. 94. Uses of MAP dataBenchmarking student performance in reading and mathEntry points of DI in reading and mathIdentification of PD for school/teachersConstruction of IEP goals and objectivesCross comparison data with reading benchmarksSelection of readability levels
    95. 95. Uses of MAP dataBenchmarking student performance in reading and mathEntry points of DI in reading and mathIdentification of PD for school/teachersConstruction of IEP goals and objectivesCross comparison data with reading benchmarksSelection of readability levelsConversation starters with parents, especially at parentconferences
    96. 96. Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decision
    97. 97. Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decisionUsed in RTI decisions, pre-referral meetings,Child Study
    98. 98. Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decisionUsed in RTI decisions, pre-referral meetings,Child StudyPart of criteria to support admission toenrichment reading
    99. 99. Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decisionUsed in RTI decisions, pre-referral meetings,Child StudyPart of criteria to support admission toenrichment readingConversation at PD planning meetings withPrincipal and teacher.
    100. 100. Part of assessment criteria to support pre-algebra decisionUsed in RTI decisions, pre-referral meetings,Child StudyPart of criteria to support admission toenrichment readingConversation at PD planning meetings withPrincipal and teacher.Part of the placement puzzle
    101. 101. Digital Portfolios Qualitative Assessment
    102. 102. Digital Portfolios
    103. 103. Digital Portfolios Based on research from the Coalition of Essential Schools
    104. 104. Digital Portfolios Based on research from the Coalition of Essential Schools  Started in 1993 with districts in New York, New Hampshire, and Kentucky
    105. 105. Digital Portfolios Based on research from the Coalition of Essential Schools  Started in 1993 with districts in New York, New Hampshire, and Kentucky The Richer Picture software currently in use for elementary, secondary, and professional
    106. 106. Digital Portfolios
    107. 107. Digital Portfolios We can use technology to create a richer picture of a student’s abilities
    108. 108. Digital Portfolios We can use technology to create a richer picture of a student’s abilities Portfolio can contain a set of work that demonstrates:
    109. 109. Digital Portfolios We can use technology to create a richer picture of a student’s abilities Portfolio can contain a set of work that demonstrates:  a student’s accomplishments AND
    110. 110. What goes in a portfolio?
    111. 111. What goes in a portfolio? Samples of student work
    112. 112. What goes in a portfolio? Samples of student work Information to put the work in context
    113. 113. What goes in a portfolio? Samples of student work Information to put the work in context Reflection on the work
    114. 114. What goes in a portfolio? Samples of student work Information to put the work in context Reflection on the work Portfolios represent a subset of student work
    115. 115. What goes in a portfolio- specifically?
    116. 116. What goes in a portfolio- specifically?Collect
    117. 117. What goes in a portfolio- specifically?Collect 2 – 4 entries from each course
    118. 118. What goes in a portfolio- specifically?Collect 2 – 4 entries from each course Each entry has student work, a summary and a reflection
    119. 119. What goes in a portfolio- specifically?Collect 2 – 4 entries from each course Each entry has student work, a summary and a reflectionSelect
    120. 120. What goes in a portfolio- specifically?Collect 2 – 4 entries from each course Each entry has student work, a summary and a reflectionSelect Student determines which entries provide the best evidence
    121. 121. What goes in a portfolio- specifically?Collect 2 – 4 entries from each course Each entry has student work, a summary and a reflectionSelect Student determines which entries provide the best evidenceReflect
    122. 122. Essential Questions
    123. 123. Essential QuestionsExpectations
    124. 124. Essential QuestionsExpectations What should students know and do?
    125. 125. Essential QuestionsExpectations What should students know and do? What purpose does the portfolio serve?
    126. 126. Essential QuestionsExpectations What should students know and do? What purpose does the portfolio serve? Who is the audience?
    127. 127. Essential QuestionsExpectations What should students know and do? What purpose does the portfolio serve? Who is the audience?Entries
    128. 128. Essential QuestionsExpectations What should students know and do? What purpose does the portfolio serve? Who is the audience?Entries How can students exhibit the expectations?
    129. 129. Essential QuestionsExpectations What should students know and do? What purpose does the portfolio serve? Who is the audience?Entries How can students exhibit the expectations? How do we ensure tasks are “portfolio worthy” –
    130. 130. Essential Questions
    131. 131. Essential QuestionsAssessment
    132. 132. Essential QuestionsAssessment How do we decide what’s good?
    133. 133. Essential QuestionsAssessment How do we decide what’s good? How do we give consistent messages?
    134. 134. Essential QuestionsAssessment How do we decide what’s good? How do we give consistent messages?School Structures
    135. 135. Essential QuestionsAssessment How do we decide what’s good? How do we give consistent messages?School Structures Who does what? When does it happen?
    136. 136. Essential QuestionsAssessment How do we decide what’s good? How do we give consistent messages?School Structures Who does what? When does it happen? Expectations for teachers, students, administrators
    137. 137. Essential QuestionsAssessment How do we decide what’s good? How do we give consistent messages?School Structures Who does what? When does it happen? Expectations for teachers, students, administrators How do we use technology?
    138. 138. Why Digital Portfolios for your School or Classroom?
    139. 139. Why Digital Portfolios for your School or Classroom?It helps to balance the quantitative side ofassessment with qualitative work.
    140. 140. Why Digital Portfolios for your School or Classroom?It helps to balance the quantitative side ofassessment with qualitative work.It honors student work product not just a scoreon a test.
    141. 141. Why Digital Portfolios for your School or Classroom?It helps to balance the quantitative side ofassessment with qualitative work.It honors student work product not just a scoreon a test.Most importantly…it is a portfolio first; thetechnology is the vehicle.
    142. 142. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?
    143. 143. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?Helps to document what students need to know and be able to do.!
    144. 144. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?Helps to document what students need to know and be able to do.!To use in parent conferences-conversation starter-helps parents understandeducational jargon.! !
    145. 145. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?Helps to document what students need to know and be able to do.!To use in parent conferences-conversation starter-helps parents understandeducational jargon.! !A tool for capturing, storing, and examining student work.!
    146. 146. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?Helps to document what students need to know and be able to do.!To use in parent conferences-conversation starter-helps parents understandeducational jargon.! !A tool for capturing, storing, and examining student work.!Allows students to help explain their understanding-application of learning.!
    147. 147. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?Helps to document what students need to know and be able to do.!To use in parent conferences-conversation starter-helps parents understandeducational jargon.! !A tool for capturing, storing, and examining student work.!Allows students to help explain their understanding-application of learning.!Tool for us to drill down into specific learning outcomes and issues, e.g. examinationof reading video to highlight a students difficulties reading.!
    148. 148. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?Helps to document what students need to know and be able to do.!To use in parent conferences-conversation starter-helps parents understandeducational jargon.! !A tool for capturing, storing, and examining student work.!Allows students to help explain their understanding-application of learning.!Tool for us to drill down into specific learning outcomes and issues, e.g. examinationof reading video to highlight a students difficulties reading.!Capturing artwork and other 3 dimensional work.
    149. 149. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?Helps to document what students need to know and be able to do.!To use in parent conferences-conversation starter-helps parents understandeducational jargon.! !A tool for capturing, storing, and examining student work.!Allows students to help explain their understanding-application of learning.!Tool for us to drill down into specific learning outcomes and issues, e.g. examinationof reading video to highlight a students difficulties reading.!Capturing artwork and other 3 dimensional work.Capturing music and p.e. work as well-the arts in general.!
    150. 150. How Could DP’s Be Useful for your school or classroom?Helps to document what students need to know and be able to do.!To use in parent conferences-conversation starter-helps parents understandeducational jargon.! !A tool for capturing, storing, and examining student work.!Allows students to help explain their understanding-application of learning.!Tool for us to drill down into specific learning outcomes and issues, e.g. examinationof reading video to highlight a students difficulties reading.!Capturing artwork and other 3 dimensional work.Capturing music and p.e. work as well-the arts in general.!Highlights students’ academic and emotional behavior in areas outside of theclassroom.! !
    151. 151. How Could DP’s Be Useful at YourSchool or Classroom? (continued)
    152. 152. How Could DP’s Be Useful at YourSchool or Classroom? (continued)
    153. 153. How Could DP’s Be Useful at YourSchool or Classroom? (continued) Getting students to "own" their learning-self reflection.
    154. 154. How Could DP’s Be Useful at YourSchool or Classroom? (continued) Getting students to "own" their learning-self reflection. Teachers better understand how their new students learn thus aiding transition-keeps kids from starting all over again and makes their elementary years much more fluid
    155. 155. How Could DP’s Be Useful at YourSchool or Classroom? (continued) Getting students to "own" their learning-self reflection. Teachers better understand how their new students learn thus aiding transition-keeps kids from starting all over again and makes their elementary years much more fluid More manageable than using paper over
    156. 156. What can be put in the DP?
    157. 157. What can be put in the DP?Scanned work (e.g. student writing)
    158. 158. What can be put in the DP?Scanned work (e.g. student writing)Photos
    159. 159. What can be put in the DP?Scanned work (e.g. student writing)PhotosOnline rubrics
    160. 160. What can be put in the DP?Scanned work (e.g. student writing)PhotosOnline rubricsVideo
    161. 161. What can be put in the DP?Scanned work (e.g. student writing)PhotosOnline rubricsVideoAnything that can be put on a web site
    162. 162. Who can view it?Teachers and studentsParents at conferencesParents at home
    163. 163. Homework for next weekComplete reflections on Stage 1 and 2 which includes and integratesSchool Wide Assessment. At least a page for both. Share a GoogleDoc with me for each. (two docs)Continue working on both Stage 1 and 2.Begin brainstorming lesson plan ideas.Read: (links on Diigo under tag “UbD”.) UbD Introduction UbD in a Nutshell
    164. 164. 3X5What was the big point you learned in classtoday?What is the main unanswered question youleave class with today?

    ×