Cameco Community    Relations     Date:           November 16, 1998     Prepared For:   Ms. Rita Mirwald                  ...
-i-i          ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThe following report was prepared based on interviews conducted with senior executives andman...
- ii -ii          TABLE OF CONTENTSi       Acknowledgments ..................................................................
- iii -       4.6.1 Educational School/Community Tours of Northern Operations ............................. 28       4.6.2...
-1-                                                             The review and analysis concluded that,1       EXECUTIVE S...
-2-                                                         approach, they have evolved to the point        •    Communica...
-3-                                                         (NGO) play an increasingly powerful roleWhile various departme...
-4-Communication          and      Relationship             with economically marginalized people. AtBuilding – the profil...
-5-of local problems impacting Cameco’s                     (a) Review    and    analyze Camecosactivities   worldwide.   ...
-6-individual community relations programs.The individual program sheets were thenreviewed with Mr. Jamie McIntyre and    ...
-7-cultures is an essential skill set for both              employment and procurement efforts). Asexecutives and front li...
-8-                                                                      Procurement3.3.1      Measuring,        Monitorin...
-9-The following section presents detailed                  listed above.descriptions of the programs and initiatives4.1  ...
- 10 -                             mindshare from other managers such as the Director of Purchasing, who                  ...
- 11 -Other Comments and           Cameco has actively facilitated the creation of joint ventures betweenInformation      ...
- 12 -Figure 3: Cameco Purchases From Northern Suppliers – 1991-98        Cameco Purchases from Northern Suppliers        ...
- 13 -4.2   Employment Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
- 14 -Northern/Native Employment Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
- 15 -Description                  A comprehensive set of inter-related initiatives to increase Northern and              ...
- 16 -                              •   Increased community education levels (through on the job training and             ...
- 17 -                                                                                 Cameco Aboriginal Employment       ...
- 18 -4.2.1  Northern Summer Student Program Description          A select group of students are employed for the summer a...
- 19 -                                     prior to applying (northern residents attending school in the south still      ...
- 20 - Other Comments and           Courses include: Information                  •   Radiation/Environmental Tech        ...
- 21 - Partners                     •   Junior Achievement Organization                              •   Various School Di...
- 22 -                              •   Ile a la Crosse School Division                              •   University of Sas...
- 23 -                                  university or technical institute in Saskatchewan, unless the desired             ...
- 24 -                                      •         Grade 11 $300.00                                      •         Grad...
- 25 -Description                  An agreement between the uranium mining companies and the Athabasca                    ...
- 26 -                              •   Wollaston Lake (hamlet)                              •   Stony Rapids             ...
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)
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Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)

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This report, prepared by Wayne Dunn, examines Cameco’s work with communities and Indigenous Peoples in Northern Saskatchewan. In 1998 (and possibly still today) Cameco’s mining operations in northern Saskatchewan was one of the most advanced in the world in terms of its work with Indigenous Peoples and communities. The relationships spanned a range of productive, educational and philanthropic activities, including especially business and employment. The relationships were analyzed using WDA’s Interaction Continuum©. The report outlines how Cameco had approached community and indigenous issues, what they were doing and what they could do to further systematize their successes and propagate them throughout their global operations. The report also discusses global trends and issues related to corporate/community/indigenous relationships and how they relate to Cameco’s context. Cameco’s innovation and leadership in working with remote Indigenous communities in northern Saskatchewan is a key factor in the strong Industry-wide social license enjoyed by the northern Saskatchewan Uranium industry today.

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Transcript of "Cameco Community Relations Report (1998)"

  1. 1. Cameco Community Relations Date: November 16, 1998 Prepared For: Ms. Rita Mirwald Senior Vice President Human Resources and Corporate Affairs Cameco Corporaton Prepared By: Wayne Dunn & Associates Canada Tel: +1-250-743-7619 Fax: +1-250-743-7659
  2. 2. -i-i ACKNOWLEDGMENTSThe following report was prepared based on interviews conducted with senior executives andmanagers of Cameco Corporation. A full list of the interviewees and the time and place of theinterviews is contained in Section 9. The recommendations developed in Section 8 are basedon our professional assessment of the situation. Although many of the recommendations aregenerally consistent with the thoughts expressed in the interviews.Without exception, everyone we interviewed was very open in their comments and generouswith their time. While everyone was extremely helpful and supportive, there were a number ofindividuals who provided the logistical support and information that facilitated our work andmade the task much easier. We would like to extend a special thank you to;Mr. Jamie McIntyre, Manager, Human Resources who was the key facilitator for the entireprocess; to Ms. JoAnne Arnold, who was always ready to drop whatever she was doing andassist us; and, to Ms. Julia Ewing, Manager, Northern Affairs, who organized and facilitated anextremely productive process in La Ronge. And finally, we would like to thankMs. Rita Mirwald, Senior Vice-President, Human Resources and Corporate Relations for givingour firm the opportunity to work with Cameco in this exciting area.Any comments on this report can be directed to the writer at:Wayne DunnWayne Dunn & Associates2457 Bakerview RdMill Bay, BC V0R 2P0CANADATel: 250-743-7619Fax: 250-743-7659Email: wayne@waynedunn.com Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  3. 3. - ii -ii TABLE OF CONTENTSi Acknowledgments ..................................................................................................... iii Table of Contents..................................................................................................... ii1 Executive Summary ................................................................................................ 1 1.1 NORTHERN SASKATCHEWAN COMMUNITY RELATIONS ................................................... 1 1.2 CORPORATE WIDE COMMUNITY RELATIONS ISSUES ........................................................ 22 Introduction and Background................................................................................ 4 2.1 BACKGROUND – A SHORT GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON COMMUNITY RELATIONS ............. 4 2.2 TERMS OF REFERENCE ....................................................................................................... 53 Methodology............................................................................................................. 5 3.1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY ............................................................................................... 5 3.2 DEVELOPMENT TECHNOLOGY SYSTEM© .......................................................................... 6 3.2.1 Corporate Ethos ........................................................................................................ 6 3.3 CONSTRUCTIVE INTERACTIONS ......................................................................................... 7 3.3.1 Measuring, Monitoring and Reporting...................................................................... 84 Community Relations Programs and Initiatives in Northern Saskatchewan.... 8 4.1 PROCUREMENT................................................................................................................. 9 4.1.1 Northern Business Development ............................................................................... 9 4.2 EMPLOYMENT ................................................................................................................ 13 4.2.1 Northern/Native Employment .................................................................................. 14 4.2.2 Northern Summer Student Program ........................................................................ 18 4.3 CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT ............................................................................................ 19 4.3.1 Multi-party Training Plan (MPTP) ......................................................................... 19 4.3.2 Junior Achievement - The Economics of Staying in School .................................... 20 4.3.3 Cameco Access Program for Engineering and Science (CAPES)........................... 21 4.3.4 Northern Scholarship Program ............................................................................... 22 4.4 TRAINING AND EDUCATION ........................................................................................... 23 4.4.1 Athabasca Education Awards.................................................................................. 23 4.5 LEVERAGING RELATIONSHIPS ...................................................................................... 24 4.5.1 Athabasca Working Group ...................................................................................... 24 4.5.2 Environmental Quality Committees (EQC) ............................................................. 26 4.5.3 Northern Liaison Committee ................................................................................... 27 4.6 GRANTS AND DONATIONS .............................................................................................. 28 Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  4. 4. - iii - 4.6.1 Educational School/Community Tours of Northern Operations ............................. 28 4.6.2 Corporate Donations and Sponsorship Program .................................................... 305 Summary of Internal Interviews .......................................................................... 316 Analysis of Programs and Initiatives in Northern Saskatchewan .................... 33 6.1 OVERALL ANALYSIS ........................................................................................................ 34 6.2 CORPORATE ETHOS ......................................................................................................... 34 6.3 CONSTRUCTIVE INTERACTIONS ....................................................................................... 36 6.3.1 Program Placement on the Interaction Continuum©............................................... 36 6.4 MEASURING AND MONITORING....................................................................................... 397 Observations .......................................................................................................... 39 7.1 ON COMMUNITY RELATIONS IN NORTHERN SASKATCHEWAN ....................................... 39 7.2 ON COMMUNITY RELATIONS GENERALLY ...................................................................... 408 Recommendations ................................................................................................. 41 8.1 RECOMMENDATIONS – NORTHERN SASKATCHEWAN PROGRAM .................................... 41 8.2 IMPLEMENTATION AND STRATEGIC STEPS ...................................................................... 439 List of Interviewees ............................................................................................... 44 9.1 CAMECO INTERVIEWEES.................................................................................................. 44 9.2 NON CAMECO INTERVIEWEES ......................................................................................... 45List of Figures and GraphsDEVELOPMENT TECHNOLOGY MODEL ........................................................................... 6INTERACTION CONTINUUM .............................................................................................. 7CAMECO PURCHASES FROM NORTHERN SUPPLIERS – 1991-98 ................................... 12ABORIGINAL EMPLOYMENT - PERCENTAGE OF WORKFORCE 1989-98....................... 16NUMBER OF ABORIGINAL EMPLOYEES - 1989-98 ......................................................... 17PLACEMENT OF PROGRAMS ALONG THE INTERACTION CONTINUUM ......................... 37 Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  5. 5. -1- The review and analysis concluded that,1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY while Cameco is, essentially, doing a very effective job of managing communityCameco contracted Wayne Dunn & relations in Northern Saskatchewan, it doesAssociates to undertake a review of its not appear to have a system to ensure thatcommunity relations programs and community relations are managedactivities in Northern Saskatchewan. The effectively in other areas where thepurpose of the review was to assist Cameco company operates. As well, the analysisto build from its Northern Saskatchewan noted some specific opportunities toexperience and to more effectively manage improve Cameco’s community relationscommunity relations throughout the program in Northern Saskatchewan throughcorporation. The project was conducted a more standardized approach to managingthrough interviews (internal and external) the process.and through a review of relevant internaldocuments and information. The analysis The following two sub-sections brieflywas undertaken using the Development outline the analysis and recommendationsTechnology System© 1 developed by Wayne for Cameco’s community relations effortsDunn & Associates. in Northern Saskatchewan and also those of a more corporate-wide nature.Public and community relations is growingin importance for the mining industry.Communities are playing an increasingly 1.1 Northern Saskatchewanimportant role in mineral exploration and Community Relationsdevelopment projects. Without a ‘locallicense 2’ there is an increased risk that While Cameco’s community relationscommunity opposition will add cost and program in Northern Saskatchewan iscomplexity to projects (and even force undoubtedly one of the most successfulabandonment in some instances). The examples of mining/community relationsinternational media and a growing number anywhere in the world, there areof non-Governmental Organizations are opportunities to enhance it and make itmonitoring corporate/community easier for the company to build from therelationships and are quick to bring Saskatchewan experience and standardizeproblems and issues to public attention. community relations throughout worldwideThis is especially significant for Cameco, operations.as problems associated with Camecoactivities anywhere in the world can There is an inconsistent level ofincrease international scrutiny of uranium understanding of the importance and themining activities in Northern scope of community relations. This canSaskatchewan. become divisive if the lack of understanding causes resentment towards the preferences given to Northern workers1 The Development Technology System is explained and suppliers. Cameco may wish toin detail in Section 3.22 consider efforts to ‘socialize’ community This is a term coined by the International FinanceCorporation to refer to the need for a level of relations throughout the organizationcommunity acceptance of a project. through activities such as: Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  6. 6. -2- approach, they have evolved to the point • Communications Materials – where they now form an inter-related developing and using materials system, with programs such as pre- to effectively communicate employment training and the multi-party what Cameco is attempting to training program being crucial to the accomplish in community success of the Northern/native relations and why it is employment program. important. This material should be aimed at both Several of the programs, most notably the internal and external audiences; Northern/native employment program and the Northern business development • Orientation of Workers and program, have measuring and monitoring Contractors – We suggest that processes that are well structured and are information on Cameco’s integrated into Cameco’s management commitment to Northern evaluation program. Many of the other people and communities be a programs are not systematically reported on standard component of the or monitored. As well, there is not an briefing and orientation of all overall measuring and monitoring process new workers and contractors, in place to evaluate the overall community much the same as safety and relations effort. Failure to effectively environmental issues currently measure and monitor community relations are; programs, and the community relations • Focal Point for Community effort as a whole, may reduce the Relations – Cameco does not effectiveness of Cameco’s investments in presently have an this area. Therefore, Cameco may wish to ‘organizational home’ for consider implementing a systematic community relations. method for measuring and reporting on Although this is not currently a all individual community relations major problem, it will likely programs and for the entire set of become more problematic as community relations efforts. Cameco moves forward with standardizing community relations. If a focal point is 1.2 Corporate Wide Community established, it is important to Relations Issues ensure that community relations programs are still Senior executives and managers throughout ‘owned’ by the responsible Cameco share an understanding of the departments (i.e. Northern importance of community relations to procurement with purchasing). Cameco’s ongoing operations. Recent events at the Kumtor operation have helpedThe analysis also indicated that Cameco has to illustrate the need for effectivedeveloped a comprehensive set of actions community relations throughout Cameco’sthat interact directly with Northern operations.communities and people. While the variousprograms were developed from an ad-hoc Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  7. 7. -3- (NGO) play an increasingly powerful roleWhile various departments are impacted in in the resource development process. Thisdifferent ways, all identified direct impacts is especially true for Cameco, a uranium-that could or did result from community mining company that will be operating inrelations problems. Potential problems the shadow of the Kumtor spill for years tothat were cited included: come. • Difficulties with lenders; We recommend that Cameco consider the following strategic steps now to position • Difficulties with shareholders; the company as a leading edge international • Erosion of management credibility (external perception); and to recover from the mining company • Difficulty accessing exploration opportunities; of the Kumtor spill. impact • Decreased staff morale; Standardize community relations – It was • Long term loss of goodwill; and, the consensus of those interviewed that this • Problems in certain markets (Sweden, Finland, Japan); important an area to be is simply too without a corporate-wide standardized approach to guide individuals, departmentsThe bottom line result of these problems and operations. As a starting point, it maycould be: be worthwhile to consider establishing a department/office that is a focal point for • Depressed share prices; community relations and other • Increased risk profile  difficulties accessing capital  higher cost of capital; sustainability issues such as environmental stewardship, social responsibility and • Reduction in productivity  increased operating costs; corporate ethics. • Increased exploration cost; and, • Potential to lose some key markets Strategic Collaboration – many national and international institutions (World Bank, CIDA, United Nations agencies, etc.) areThere was a consensus that strong steps potential collaborators in communityshould be taken to minimize the potential relations efforts in various areas wherefor future community and public relations Cameco operates. As well, Cameco canproblems such as what occurred at Kumtor. build on its experience in working withWhile the community relations program in NGOs in Northern Saskatchewan toNorthern Saskatchewan is world class, establish linkages into the internationalthere is no structure or standard in place to NGO community. Collaboration with theseensure that it is replicated elsewhere in institutions and NGOs leverages andCameco’s operations. Every executive we increases the return on Cameco’s directinterviewed strongly supported the community relations investment.standardization of community relations Additionally, it can help to prevent the typeacross Cameco’s operations. of solitary exposure that occurred in Kyrgyzstan and help to provide thePublic and community relations will effective communications networks that arebecome increasingly important for the necessary for an international company.mining industry. Local communities andactivist Non-Governmental Organizations Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  8. 8. -4-Communication and Relationship with economically marginalized people. AtBuilding – the profile that recent events the same time, environmental andhave given Cameco, can help to effectively regulatory frameworks andcommunicate the new steps Cameco is licensing/permitting procedures, combinedtaking to manage community relations and with the ubiquity of the global media andsustainability issues. Cameco may wish to the growth of the Internet, are focusingconsider making a series of presentations at increased attention on the interface betweeninstitutions such as the World Bank, local communities and mining andInternational Finance Corporation (IFC) exploration activities. This gives localand United Nations Development Program communities and activist NGOs an(UNDP) to highlight internal actions (i.e. increasingly powerful role in the resourcestandardizing community relations, dealing development process.with other sustainability issues, communityrelations successes in Northern This influence will likely intensify with theSaskatchewan, etc.). This would help to next upswing in mineral prices. As pricesincrease confidence in Cameco and begin rise, a large volume of projects in the newlybuilding relationships that are necessary for explored areas will become economicallyan international mining company operating viable and will begin gearing up to enterin today’s climate. production – all under increasing scrutiny of the global media, anti-mining activistsOngoing Information and Networking – and the very influential NGO community.It is important for Cameco to have regular The volume of projects under developmentinformation flow from an ever-expanding will result in numerous instances ofinternational network in the area of environmental and community problemssustainable development. arising. These issues will be quickly brought to the attention of the world. It is likely that the number of problematic situations, coupled with an increasing2 INTRODUCTION AND global focus on environmental and BACKGROUND social/community issues, will heighten public concern over the mining industry as a whole. This will focus increased attention2.1 Background – A Short Global on the industry and on environmental and Perspective on Community social problems at various project sites. Relations A critical skill for resource companies inThe mining industry is entering a new era, this new environment will be the ability toone in which public and community interact effectively with local communitiesrelations will become increasingly and the international community. Withoutimportant. Trade and investment this skill, companies will experience risingliberalization has opened many new costs and falling profits as local hostilitycountries and areas to mineral exploration creates delays and adds complexity to theirand development – often-remote areas that operations. The ability of communities andhave never before been explored with media to quickly bring local issues tomodern technology and that are populated international attention will increase the risk Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  9. 9. -5-of local problems impacting Cameco’s (a) Review and analyze Camecosactivities worldwide. Conversely, community relations programs incompanies that are known for their ability Northern Saskatchewan.to develop projects in ways that value and (b) Prepare a report detailing the results ofbenefit communities will become desirable the analysis of Cameco’s communitypartners as communities begin to play a relations programs in Northernrole in determining who will be allowed to Saskatchewan.develop local resources. (c) With a focus on international projects,Despite current difficulties, Cameco is well comment on the potential for Camecopositioned to thrive in this new to make strategic use of communityenvironment. The Northern Saskatchewan collaboration to enhance opportunityoperations are arguably the best in the acquisition activities.world at collaborating with localcommunities to leverage exploration and The original contract start date of Maymining activities for creating meaningful 1998 was postponed due to issues arising atand sustainable local benefits. The recent Cameco’s Kumtor operation in Kyrgyzstan.developments at Kumtor have created an The community relations problems at theinternal awareness of the importance of Kumtor mine resulted in an expansion ofcommunity and public relations that can be the terms of reference to includeused to Cameco’s benefit. recommendations on how Cameco should approach the issue of community relationsUnfortunately, Cameco’s profile after the on a global basis.Kumtor spill, coupled with its position as aleading uranium producer, has alsoincreased the potential damage that could 3 METHODOLOGYaccrue from future environmental andsocial problems. 3.1 Research Methodology Research was conducted during three visitsPrior to the Kumtor spill Ms. Rita Mirwald to Cameco’s operations in Saskatoon (July,(Senior Vice-President, Human Resources August and September) and two visits to Laand Corporate Relations) and Mr. Jamie Ronge. Executives, managers and a BoardMcIntyre (Manager – Human Resources) Member from Cameco were interviewed.contracted Wayne Dunn & Associates to As well, a number of government officialsundertake an analysis and assessment of from Northern Saskatchewan wereCameco’s community relations efforts in interviewed. (See section 9 for details)Northern Saskatchewan. Corporate documentation pertaining to community relations was also reviewed.2.2 Terms of Reference Cameco managers responsible for community relations programs in Northern Saskatchewan completed the DevelopmentThe terms of reference for the project were: Technology Analysis Sheet for Community Relations Programs and Initiatives for Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  10. 10. -6-individual community relations programs.The individual program sheets were thenreviewed with Mr. Jamie McIntyre and Fig. 1: Development Technology Modelamended to include additional informationas necessary. Development Technology©Cameco’s community relations activities in A 360o SystemNorthern Saskatchewan were then analyzedusing the Development Technology Constructive InteractionSystem© (See below for details on this Measuring &system). The results of this analysis are Monitoringcontained in Section 6. The analysisproduced a number of specific Firmrecommendations which are contained insection 8.Based on information gathered frominternal interviews with Cameco executives Corporate Ethos(See section 5 for details) and buildingfrom Cameco’s and Wayne Dunn &Associate’s experience and knowledge on There are three basic components to thecommunity relations, a strategic action plan Development Technology methodology:was developed for a corporate approach toeffectively managing community relations (a) Corporate Ethos – reviewing the(See section 8 for details). ability of a corporation to work effectively in diverse cultural settings.3.2 Development Technology (b) Constructive Interaction - the range, System© frequency and intensity of interactions between the corporation and theThe analysis of Cameco’s community community.relations efforts in Northern Saskatchewanwas carried out using our Development (c) Measuring, monitoring and evaluatingTechnology© methodology. The the impact of corporate/communitymethodology focuses on three critical interactions.aspects of the management ofcorporate/community relations and enablesa standardized evaluation of how a 3.2.1 Corporate Ethoscorporation manages the interface betweenits operations and local communities. Effective community relations demands that the corporation, its personnel and sub- contractors have the capacity, the desire and the tools to bridge cultural and capacity gaps that often separate them from local communities. The ability to effectively communicate and interact across diverse Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  11. 11. -7-cultures is an essential skill set for both employment and procurement efforts). Asexecutives and front line technicians in a well, there is often other developmentmodern resource company. Without these interests that are willing to assist financiallyskills, it is nearly impossible to establish a and operationally in developing varioussystematic process for creating and interactions and programs.maintaining good community relations. Cameco’s various community relationsEvaluation of the corporate ethos includes programs will be assessed and placed atan assessment of the firm’s current capacity appropriate locations along the Interactionin this area; existing programs, activities Continuum. As well the integration of theand resources that support this competency programs (the use of one program toand any special issues pertaining to the enhance the effectiveness of another) willwhere the operation(s) are located. be analyzed. It is expected that some programs will ‘fit’ into more than one grouping on the continuum.3.3 Constructive Interactions Figure 2: Interaction Continuum Fig. 2: Interaction Continuum©The interactions that occur between acorporation and local communities are themost crucial component of a community Partneringrelations strategy. There is a series of Communication & Consultationpotential interactions that can have varyingimpacts on the community and its Procurementrelationship with the corporation. Theyrange from a ‘beads ‘n trinkets’,paternalistic approach, with a strong Employmentemphasis on donor/recipient relations,through to more mutually beneficialinteractions that facilitate the development Capacityof constructive and sustainable Developmentrelationships. An effective and sustainablecommunity relations program will have acomprehensive mix of inter-related Training &initiatives at various points along the Educationcontinuum. LeveragingOften there are huge capacity gaps that Relationshipsmust be transcended before localcommunities can become moreconstructively involved in resource Grants &projects. Programs at higher points on the Donationscontinuum can be very dependent upon theimpacts of programs at other levels (i.e. Beads & Trinketstraining and capacity developmentprograms are often necessary to support Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  12. 12. -8- Procurement3.3.1 Measuring, Monitoring and • Northern Business Reporting Developmen EmploymentIn order to maximize the effectiveness of • Northern/Native Employmentcommunity relations investments, it is • Northern Summer Studentimportant to implement a comprehensive Programmeasuring, monitoring and reportingprogram and to integrate it into existing Capacity Developmentmanagement and contractor evaluation • Multi-party Training Planprocesses. The assessment will evaluate (MPTP)the extent to which Cameco systematically • Junior Achievement - Themeasures, monitors and evaluates Economics of Staying incommunity relations programs and Schoolactivities. • Cameco Access Program for Engineering and Science (CAPES)4 COMMUNITY RELATIONS • Northern Scholarship Program PROGRAMS AND INITIATIVES Training and Education IN NORTHERN • Athabasca Education Awards SASKATCHEWAN Leveraging RelationshipsCameco’s community relations programs • Athabasca Working Groupwere analyzed using the Development • Environmental QualityTechnology methodology discussed in the Committees (EQC)previous section. The programs were • Northern Liaison Committeegrouped in appropriate categories along theInteraction Continuum (see Section 6.3.1 Grants and DonationsFigure 6, p37). Many of the programs ‘fit’ • Educationalinto two or more groupings. The following School/Community Tours ofdescriptions of the individual programs are Northern Operationsorganized based on the order in which they • Corporate Donations andwere first placed on the Interaction Sponsorship ProgramContinuum. A complete listing 3 of allprograms is: Note: Pre-Employment Training, a workforce preparation program, is not listed above because it is not a stand-alone program, but an integral component of both the3 Programs that are associated with more than one Northern/Native Employmentgrouping on the Interaction Continuum are only listed Program and the Multi-Partyin the first grouping in which they were placed. For acomplete listing of all programs in each grouping, see Training Plan.Section 6.3.1, Program Placement on the InteractionContinuum. Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  13. 13. -9-The following section presents detailed listed above.descriptions of the programs and initiatives4.1 Procurement4.1.1 Northern Business Development Description To select and develop Northern suppliers and contractors to provide goods and services to Cameco’s operations. Also the program is beginning to address assisting Northern suppliers to lessen their dependence on Cameco. Objective To facilitate the establishment and development of successful Northern businesses and to familiarise Northern businesses with the Purchasing and Transportation department at Cameco Responsibility • The Purchasing and Transportation Department • Northern Affairs Department History The focus on Northern business development was present prior to the creation of Cameco in 1988. It was driven by a number of factors including the surface land use agreement, the need for local support in the permitting and regulatory process and by Cameco executives and managers who recognised its importance. The focus on developing Northern suppliers has matured over time. Initially it was quite easy to qualify and many early attempts at partnerships between a southern contractor and a Northern partner did not produce the Northern benefits that were hoped for. There has been an increasing emphasis on developing Northern businesses that benefit Northerners, measuring and monitoring Northern employment and benefits that are provided by Northern businesses (and other suppliers as well). Also, there is a growing sophistication to the Northern business development program, a full time position has recently been created and the objectives of the program are fully incorporated into the strategic planning process and into CAMECO’s Performance Management Program. Originally it was coordinated through Northern affairs and purchasing departments. As the volume increased and the complexity of the requirements increased it demanded a more strategic control of the program and the Superintendent of Northern Purchasing and Transportation position was developed. Currently this position has first line responsibility for this function. Budget It is difficult to determine the overall budget for this program. There is a new staff position, Superintendent of Northern Business Development and Transportation that is dedicated to the program. Also, the program has Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  14. 14. - 10 - mindshare from other managers such as the Director of Purchasing, who reports on the program at monthly management committee meetings. As well, it is recognized that there are additional costs to developing Northern suppliers, especially in the initial years as they develop the capacity and expertise to compete on a cost basis with more experienced southern suppliers.Success Indicators There is a well-developed measuring and monitoring process for thisMeasuring and program. It is fully incorporated into the MAP process with annual dollarMonitoring targets established and progress reported on monthly. Key success indicators are: • Dollar value of Northern purchasing • Northern/native employees working for contractors • Number of Northern and native suppliers A committed focus on Northern procurement has produced some impressive results. The current target is to procure 35% of total purchases in support of Northern mining operations from Northern suppliers Northern purchasing has steadily surpassed target levels. In 1991 the target was $10 million and the actual procurement was $10.6 million. In 1998 the target for the entire year is $67 million and, as of August 31 Northern purchasing has already reached $62.2 million. During this time the number of Aboriginal suppliers has risen from 6 in 1991 to 26 in 1998. The chart on the following page provides additional detail. Northern purchasing has a direct impact on Northern employment. In August 1998 of the 554 contract employees reporting to Cameco sites (this doesn’t include NRT and other off site) 321 were Northerners and 275 are aboriginal In addition to measuring the dollar value of Northern procurement, the program also tracks Northern employment and other Northern benefits that flow from this initiative.Community Communities benefit directly from this program. Local businesses areBenefits supported (and often created) as a direct result of the program. Northern suppliers are required to employ local Northern people, thus supporting the local economy. Cameco’s focus on Northern suppliers puts salary and profit into the economies of Northern communities and helps increase Northern business’ capacity to capture other opportunities. There is an important psychological benefit for communities when they have the competent, highly visible entrepreneurs (community capacity)Cameco Community Relations (electronic version)November 16, 1998
  15. 15. - 11 -Other Comments and Cameco has actively facilitated the creation of joint ventures betweenInformation Northern contractors and traditional suppliers of goods and services. This approach, originally developed with the Kitsaki/Trimac joint venture to form NRT Trucking, has proven to be a successful method of enabling Northern suppliers to bridge capacity gaps that prevent them from moving into some business opportunities. Cameco has used this approach to develop Northern suppliers for underground mining services, catering, sophisticated engineering and construction and other services that the Northern business community did not have the capacity to develop on its own. Cameco is beginning to take a proactive role in supporting Northern businesses beyond simply assisting them to supply goods and services to Cameco’s operations. One issue that is looming is the slowdown in Northern procurement that will occur when the current construction phase winds down. There is currently some internal thinking to address the issue proactively by bringing major Northern industrial interests (Weyerhaeuser, Sask. Power, Sask. Tel, other mines, Sask. Highways, etc.) together in a Northern procurement committee. This committee could then share information about opportunities and about supplier capacity. Other issues that have been identified include the need for closer linkages between the Northern business development program and other groups that support Northern business development. As well, there is interest in promoting increased internal involvement in the program and in facilitating training support for Northern suppliers.Partners The managers of the program work closely with other mining interests in the region. As well, they are establishing linkages with other associations and agencies such as the Inter-provincial Association on Native Employment, the Northern Labour Market Committee and various organisations that support Northern and Aboriginal businesses (Sask. Northern Affairs, Aboriginal Business Canada, Sask. Power Northern Enterprise Fund, etc.) Business and employment reporting is now part of the surface lease agreements. It is necessary to report Northern business and employment statistics and to forecast business opportunities. Northern procurement and hiring is part of the basis of a partnership with governments, assisting them to allocate Northern development resources in a more targeted and focused way. As noted previously, the program managers are considering spearheading the establishment of a Northern industrial procurement committee.Cameco Community Relations (electronic version)November 16, 1998
  16. 16. - 12 -Figure 3: Cameco Purchases From Northern Suppliers – 1991-98 Cameco Purchases from Northern Suppliers (millions) $100 $90 $80 Purchases (millions) $70 $60 $50 $40 $30 $20 $10 $- 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 Projected Value $10.0 $12.5 $20.0 $25.0 $30.0 $36.6 $58.0 $67.0 Actual Value $10.6 $16.7 $22.8 $27.9 $44.5 $44.1 $74.5 $93.3 Aboriginal Suppliers 6 8 10 12 15 20 21 26The above chart displays the growth in Cameco’s purchases of goods and services fromNorthern Saskatchewan suppliers and demonstrates that there has been a steady growth in thenumber of northern suppliers. As well, it illustrates how Cameco has exceeded Northernprocurement targets in every year since 1991. Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  17. 17. - 13 -4.2 Employment Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  18. 18. - 14 -Northern/Native Employment Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  19. 19. - 15 -Description A comprehensive set of inter-related initiatives to increase Northern and native employment in Cameco’s operationsObjective To increase the total number of Northern and Native people employed at Cameco’s operations and to increase the percentage of Northern and Native people employed in supervisory and technical positions.Responsibility Responsibility is dispersed throughout the Human Resources and Operations Management departments. Individual managers and supervisors have responsibility for meeting objectives and targets integrated into their overall objectives and evaluations.History Northern and Native employment objectives were included in the recommendations of the Bayda report, which supported the development of Key Lake and the Northern Saskatchewan Uranium industry. Initial efforts at meeting Northern employment targets were largely unsuccessful due to low Northern literacy rates, lack of Northern capacity and industry’s lack of expertise in developing the Northern workforce. Employment quotas were removed from Surface Leases on the condition that companies would enthusiastically endorse ‘best efforts’ to increase Northern and native employment. This proved to be a key turning point. A number of ad-hoc programs and initiatives by Cameco and others in the industry attempted to increase Northern employment. While there was some initial success the real turning point came with the introduction of the multi- party training program (see separate description). This plan systematically addressed capacity development and collaboration in a way that enabled both an increase in the number of Northern/native employees and an increase in the supervisory and technical level positions filled by Northern and native personnel. It should also be noted that an early attempt at collaboration, the Northern Mine Co-ordinators group brought together industry, government and some community interests on an informal basis. This group met quarterly, shared information and helped to spearhead some initiatives such as the initial underground mining training program.Budget There is no direct budget for Northern/native employment. The initiative is completely integrated into Cameco’s human resource management processes.Success Indicators The key success indicators are the number of Northern and native peopleMeasuring and employed at Cameco’s operations and the growth in occupational groupingsMonitoring as Northern and native people increase their representation in technical, trade and managerial occupations.Community • Salaries earned by local employeesBenefits • Increased focus on education (many employees are upgrading their own educational levels and this helps to develop a family/community culture supporting increased education)Cameco Community Relations (electronic version)November 16, 1998
  20. 20. - 16 - • Increased community education levels (through on the job training and development) increase the overall capacity of the community Other Comments and • The 7 in 7 out work schedule and aircraft commuting system has Information enabled Northern and native employees to maintain employment and retain time for traditional hunting, and other traditional activities • The Northern employment database helps with screening and targeted recruitment. Cameco collaborates with Cogema on the database • Cameco is beyond reacting to the Northern labour force – now managing it. Human Resource management has moved to external focus • Employees from over 20 Northern communities • Employment increases through hiring and also through purchasing (see Northern business development program) • Northern/native employment has gone from a legal obligation dictated by the surface land use agreements to a corporate mission that is even reflected in vision and values statement and in corporate policies • Cameco’s payroll to Aboriginal employees is over $20 million per year. • There is a strong focus on the need to move beyond entry level positions (workplace literacy) • There are supervisory development programs to identify and develop aboriginal supervisors • Cameco has been able to secure union co-operation – every second apprenticeship to Northerner of aboriginal descent. • The development of pre Employment training programs significantly enhanced the ability to recruit and retain Northern/native employees. • Strong collaboration with others in industry, with federal, provincial and local governments and other stakeholders to get major initiatives in place. Collaboration is so strong that Cameco has even trained employees specifically for competitors • Northern employment conditions have been written into contracts with suppliers Partners Partners and collaborators include; • Federal, provincial and local government departments • Aboriginal organisations • Unions • Other mining companiesFigure 4: Aboriginal Employment - Percentage of Workforce 1989-98 Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  21. 21. - 17 - Cameco Aboriginal Employment (includes permanent contractor workforce) 50% 44% 43% Percentage of Total Workforce 45% 42% 42% 39% 40% 37% 37% 34% 35% 30% 29% 30% 25% 20% 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 (Aug) The above graph demonstrates the effectiveness of Cameco’s efforts to increase the percentage of Aboriginal people employed in the company’s operations. Figure 5: Number of Aboriginal Employees - 1989-98 The graph to the Aboriginal Employees at Cameco left portrays the (includes permanent contractor workforce) success of Cameco’s efforts 600 557 in increase the 492 number of 500 AboriginalNumber of Employees employees in the 400 workforce. The 319 299 dramatic increase 300 274 251 in employees 231 204 200 166 178 between 1996 and 1997 is due 100 to the beginning of construction at 0 McArthur River. 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 (Aug) Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  22. 22. - 18 -4.2.1 Northern Summer Student Program Description A select group of students are employed for the summer at one of Cameco’s Northern mines. Special (but not exclusive) consideration will be given to students interested in pursuing careers related to the mining industry. Objective Cameco can utilize this opportunity to educate students about the mining and uranium industry and perhaps encourage students to pursue a career in mining. Cameco’s summer employment program is designed to: • Educate students about the mining and uranium industry. • Enable the corporation to undertake special projects which can be done by students. • Provide relief coverage when regular employees take their holidays throughout the summer. • Assist students to gain experience in their chosen field of study. • Provide students with job related experience and assists them financially so that they may continue to finance their education. Responsibility Cameco’s Northern Affairs Officer History This program has been in place since Cameco’s inception in 1988. Budget Each Dept/Site is responsible for their summer student program i.e. salaries, medicals, accommodation, etc. Success Indicators Success indicators include: Measuring and • Number of applicants Monitoring • Program participants who work with Cameco upon graduation Community • Provides summer employment for students Benefits • Provides students with - On the job education - Employment - Experience. Other Comments and Students will be limited to 2 terms (summers) of employment with Cameco Information to ensure that a greater number of students are provided the opportunity to gain experience directly related to their area of study. The exception will be students who are in non-traditional areas of study and have been targeted as future full time employees by a site or a department, particularly in an advanced professional occupation. To qualify, students must: • be 18 years of age • be in good physical health (a pre-employment medical is required). • have been a resident of Saskatchewan’s North for at least five years Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  23. 23. - 19 - prior to applying (northern residents attending school in the south still qualify). • Submit a verification of enrolment in school. • Submit a verification of anticipated enrolment for the following school year.4.3 Capacity Development4.3.1 Multi-party Training Plan (MPTP) Description The goals are to: • enhance the potential for economic development of the communities of Saskatchewan’s North • maximize the employment and economic opportunities for people of the communities of Saskatchewan’s North deriving from the activities of the mineral industry in the North. Objective To assist Northerners in upgrading their skills to meet the requirements of the mining industry and gain employment in the industry Responsibility The Mineral Sector Steering Committee co-ordinates the implementation of the MPTP. History Multi-party Training Plan I (1993-1998) Multi-party Training Plan II (1998-2003) Budget • Plan I - $10.5 million • Plan II - $13.0 million Cameco’s total contribution to this program has been $2.5 million. Contributions for recent years are: • April 1995 to March 1996 - $418,698 • April 1996 to March 1997 - $334,985 • April 1997 to March 1998 - $424,440 A small portion of these costs were direct cash expenses. The remainder were indirect costs such as flights to and from minesites, supervision, supernumerary positions and training expenses. Success Indicators A key success indicator is the increase in the number of Northern residents Measuring and of Saskatchewan holding technical and supervisory positions in the mining Monitoring industry. The program has elaborate measuring and monitoring processes that enable tracking of students and impacts. Additionally, a comprehensive review of the program was conducted in 1998. The Department of Indian and Northern Affairs has noted that this program created a 4-500% higher rate of Aboriginal participation in the industry than other plans/initiatives Community More Northerners are able to gain employment in the mining industry; not Benefits only in entry-level positions but in technical, trade, supervisory and professional positions. The training helps to minimize many of the barriers preventing full participation of Northerners. Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  24. 24. - 20 - Other Comments and Courses include: Information • Radiation/Environmental Tech • Workplace Ed/Literacy • Adult 12/Pre-Technologies • Geophysics • Ecological Technician • Chemical Technician • Instrumentation Technician • Underground Mining • Truck Driver Training • Apprenticeship Training • Work placements An evaluation titled Summative Evaluation of the Multi-party Training Plan 1993-1998 was completed in April 1998 by the Business Advisory Services from the College of Commerce at the University of Saskatchewan. Partners Training Program partners include:: • The Province of Saskatchewan • The Government of Canada • The Prince Albert Grand Council • The Meadow Lake Tribal Council • The Metis Nation Training and Education Authorities • The Northern Mining Industry (Cameco, Cogema, and Cigar Lake)4.3.2 Junior Achievement - The Economics of Staying in School Description A series of four classroom activities designed to help students understand the importance of an education and the personal and economic costs of dropping out of school. Objective To encourage students to examine their future and to understand the connection between education and future economic opportunities. Responsibility Larry Chrispen and the Northern Affairs Department History Started in ‘97-’98 with four schools in the North as a pilot project Budget For ‘98-‘99 the cost was $35,000 shared between Cameco and Cogema. Success Indicators Yearly suggestions from student participants, educator/volunteer Measuring and participants, Northern development co-ordinator and JA president on Monitoring program successes and how the program could be improved. Community Encourages students to remain in school, increasing the overall education Benefits level of the community. Other Comments and The program was specially developed for delivery to Aboriginal students in Information Saskatchewan’s north. It is expanding in ‘98-‘99 to include delivery of the program to 10 Northern schools Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  25. 25. - 21 - Partners • Junior Achievement Organization • Various School Divisions • Cogema4.3.3 Cameco Access Program for Engineering and Science (CAPES) Description An agreement between Cameco and the University of Saskatchewan Objective • increase awareness and knowledge in the general areas of science, technology and engineering among elementary and secondary students in remote centres of Saskatchewan • supporting the pre-entrance training needs of rural and, in particular, Northern aboriginal students • consulting with elders, community leaders, K-12 and post-secondary educators in Northern Saskatchewan • collaborating with other institutions, engineering colleges, and multimedia and distance education centres to develop a comprehensive assessment of teaching materials and methodologies • providing academic, cultural and social support for students at the U of S that includes individual counselling and tutoring • providing teaching support to the instructors involved with the program Responsibility • Jamie McIntyre and Roger Francis (Internal) • Harold Schultz, Cameco advisor to the CAPES board • CAPES advisory board History An agreement between Cameco and The University of Saskatchewan which came into effect June 1, 1997. A program organized under the umbrella of the College of Engineering’s Innovative Teaching and Learning Centre. Budget • $1,000,000 over 5 years - 1997/98 approved expenditures - $291,972 - 1998/99 approved commitments - $57,329 Success Indicators Success will be an increase in the number of students enrolling in and Measuring and completing science and math post-secondary training. Ultimately, success Monitoring will be a pool of Northern Saskatchewan expertise in science and engineering. Community • Sci-Fi Camps Benefits • university math/science/engineering classes offered in Northern Sask. • more emphasis in K-12 on science and math Other Comments and • Development of computer based foundations course in mathematics and Information math readiness course • Have held two Northern conferences on math/science education Partners • Cameco, • College of Engineering, • NORTEP/NORPAC, • Northlands College, • Post-Secondary Education and Skills Training Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  26. 26. - 22 - • Ile a la Crosse School Division • University of Saskatchewan – College of Engineering/Extension Division • Northern Lights School Division4.3.4 Northern Scholarship Program Description Cameco recognizes the value of a post-secondary education and supports Northern Saskatchewan students in their efforts. Winners are selected based on academic standing, residency and career interest. Special (but not exclusive) consideration will be given to applicants pursuing careers related to some aspect of the mining industry. Objective To enhance post-secondary education opportunities for students of Saskatchewan’s north, by providing financial assistance in the form of scholarships. Responsibility Cameco’s Northern Affairs Officer is in charge of the program, however, applications are also reviewed by a selection committee of members from Cameco, Saskatchewan Education - Northern Division, Northern Lights School Division, and Prince Albert Grand Council. History This program has been in existence since Cameco’s inception in 1988. Budget • Scholarships of up to $5,000 each are awarded to select qualified applicants enrolling in a university degree program • Cameco awards scholarships of up to $3,000 each to select applicants who are entering trades or technical training at a recognized technical institute. Success Indicators • Increases in the number of Northern students enrolling in math and Measuring and science related courses and in technical and professional. Monitoring Community • Recognising the academic achievements of Northern students at the Benefits post-secondary level on an annual basis provides incentive to Northern students. • Increasing the education level of Northern residents • Increasing the academic performance of Northern students. Other Comments and • Applicants must have lived in Saskatchewan’s north for at least five Information years immediately prior to applying. Students who normally reside in this region but are attending school in the south are also eligible. • Recipients of other scholarships are eligible, but in such cases Cameco’s scholarship is reduced by the amount that the other award exceeds $1,000. • Applicants must meet the entrance requirements of, and plan to attend, a Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  27. 27. - 23 - university or technical institute in Saskatchewan, unless the desired program of study is not available in this province. • Those applying for renewal must maintain at least a 75% academic average and be eligible to progress to the next year of a program which is acceptable to the selection committee. Partners N/A4.4 Training and EducationThe CAPES Program and the Northern Scholarship Program are both training and educationprograms and capacity development programs. They are described in detail in the previoussection.4.4.1 Athabasca Education Awards Description Approximately forty Northern Students are recognized annually for their combined achievements in the following areas: • Academic performance • Traditional cultural skills • School attendance • Athletics • Community service • Second language ability • Special talents and skills Objective • To promote student achievement and academic success and to encourage students to graduate from Grade 12. • To identify the wide rage of student achievement in the Athabasca region. • To promote and reflect the unique cultural fabric of the Athabasca region. Responsibility Cameco’s Northern Affairs Officer and a representative from Cigar Lake Mining Corporation and Cogema Resources. History Originally started in 1989 by Cameco and Cigar Lake Mining Corporation, Cogema Resources joined the program in 1994. Budget 1. In addition to monetary awards, the corporate sponsors (Cameco, Cigar Lake Mining and Cogema Resources) also provides each award winner with a non-monetary award to symbolise the students’ achievement. 2. Value of the Awards is as follows: • Grade 7 $100.00 • Grade 8 $150.00 • Grade 9 $200.00 • Grade 10 $250.00 Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  28. 28. - 24 - • Grade 11 $300.00 • Grade 12 $500.00 The awards must be used in a fashion that is most beneficial and suited to the recipients to further their education or individual interests such as sports, leisure activities or hobbies. Local education authorities will be responsible for ensuring that the recipients are guided by this principle. Success Indicators The success of the Athabasca Awards Program are evaluated according to Measuring and the following criteria: Monitoring • Increased levels of academic achievement; • Increased student attendance rates and lower school drop out rates; • Evaluation data provided by participating schools. Community • Since the start of the Program in 1989, 382 recipients have received the Benefits Awards. • It’s a stay-in-school initiative. • Lower dropout rate. • Recognizing the academic achievements of Northern students. • Recognizing and promoting traditional cultural skills. Other Comments and Two awards are provided in Grade 7 through 12 in each community: Information • one award is provided to the students achieving the top academic average in each class, Grade 7 through 12 in each school in the Athabasca Region. This award is called the Academic Award. • one award is also provided to the student judged to be the top overall student in each class, (Grade 7 through 12) in each school in the Athabasca Region. This award is called the Athabasca Award. • School principals are responsible for administering the program at the school level and for establishing a recipient selection process. Principals are requested to review program criteria with staff, students and community. The recipient selection process should include staff, administration and community members. • A student is only eligible to receive one award - either the Academic or the Athabasca Award - per school year. Partners • Cigar Lake Mining Corporation • Cogema Resources.4.5 Leveraging RelationshipsThe Multi-Party Training Plan, which was described in detail in Section 4.3 also classifies as aprogram in the Leveraging Relationships category.4.5.1 Athabasca Working Group Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998
  29. 29. - 25 -Description An agreement between the uranium mining companies and the Athabasca communities with respect to: • Environmental protection, compensation and indemnification in the event of losses caused by emissions • Employment, training and business development opportunities; and • Benefit sharing Related to the uranium mining projects of Rabbit Lake, McArthur River, Cigar Lake, Mclean Lake and Midwest LakeObjective To negotiate conditions with respect to the three key issues noted above and to conclude with an Impact Management Agreement (IMA) signed between the Companies and the CommunitiesResponsibility The Athabasca Working Group (AWG) consists of members from the respective Companies and from communities in the Athabasca region.History An Agreement-in-Principle was signed May 30, 1994. It is anticipated that the Impact Management Agreement will be signed in 1998.Budget The cost of transporting, meals and accommodation of AWG members is divided equally between Cameco, Cogema and Cigar Lake. Industry’s total investment in the program to date is in excess of $200,000. (the costs were much higher prior to 1996 during the hearing process). Cameco’s share of costs in the past two years has been • 1996 - $14,670 • 1997 - $32,081Success Indicators A variety of parameters including:Measuring and • number of employees at the mine sites from the Athabasca region;Monitoring • quality of the relationships with the communities • acceptance by elders in the communities • acceptance by participating companies • successful negotiation of an Impact Management Agreement • donation and sponsorship dollars invested in the CommunitiesCommunity • strategy in place if environmental damage occursBenefits • preferential employment, training and business development opportunities; and • benefit sharing by enhancing the education, training, health, cultural recreational and economic development of the RegionOther Comments and The IMA may not be signed until at least the fall of ‘98 however, the termsInformation of the agreement are currently being implemented.Partners The project is based on collaboration between Industry and Communities. Participants include; • Cameco, • Cigar Lake Mining Corporation, • Cogema, • Hatchet Lake Band, • Black Lake Band • Fond du Lac Band,Cameco Community Relations (electronic version)November 16, 1998
  30. 30. - 26 - • Wollaston Lake (hamlet) • Stony Rapids • Uranium City • Camsell Portage4.5.2 Environmental Quality Committees (EQC) Description The committees, which are formed by government, are composed of individuals nominated by his/her community. The EQC serves as a bridge between Northerners, government and the uranium mining industry. The committee is a bridge built upon a solid foundation of mutual trust and respect. Objective To assure people from Saskatchewan’s north that the uranium mines are operating in compliance with all applicable Provincial and Federal regulations and the Northern economic benefits are being maximized through appropriate hiring practises and policies related to the enhanced capture of business opportunities. Responsibility Northern Mines Monitoring Secretariat (NMMS) History In the Government’s Position on Proposed Uranium Mining Developments in Northern Saskatchewan (December, 1993), Saskatchewan committed to the establishment of a central support agency responsible for collecting and communicating government’s monitoring efforts (the NMMS) and for providing support to regionally based committees composed of representatives from impact communities (the EQCs). Budget Operational costs for the EQCs are paid by the Province of Saskatchewan and Cameco pays direct costs associated with minesite visits and other direct interactions. Also, Cameco makes professional expertise available to assist the Committees to understand technical material and issues. Success Indicators Increased awareness and understanding of Northerners regarding monitoring Measuring and activities surrounding the uranium industry, and the role of government and Monitoring industry in protecting the environment, ensuring the health and safety of workers and the public, and improving the distribution of benefits amongst Northern residents. Community • Providing a direct link between the community and the EQC and Benefits NMMS • Liaisoning with community residents in order to convey to the EQC any concerns on issues related to uranium industry activities or requests for information, meetings or activities Other Comments and There are three EQCs – one in each of the regions. Each of the three visit Information the operation(s) in their region at least once per year. This is generally done around re-licensing time to allow input into the re-licensing process. The Cameco Community Relations (electronic version) November 16, 1998

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