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Lifted by the cloud
Lifted by the cloud
Lifted by the cloud
Lifted by the cloud
Lifted by the cloud
Lifted by the cloud
Lifted by the cloud
Lifted by the cloud
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Lifted by the cloud

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Lifted by the Cloud is a vision of cloud-based accessibility presentation by Wayne Caswell as part of a contest sponsored by the FCC, the Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities, and Raising the …

Lifted by the Cloud is a vision of cloud-based accessibility presentation by Wayne Caswell as part of a contest sponsored by the FCC, the Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities, and Raising the Floor. It’s based on the author’s 2006 presentation on BIG Broadband and Gigabit-to-the-Home.

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  • This presentation by Wayne Caswell was submitted as part of a contest sponsored by the Federal Communications Commission, the Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities, and Raising the Floor, located on the web at http://challenge.gov/challenges/82.“Lifted by the Cloud” is presented as a vision of BIG Broadband and Cloud-based Accessibility. It’s based on the author’s 2006 presentation on Fiber Optics and Gigabit-to-the-Home, his experience as a technologist and futurist, and his vision of "Consumers with Easy access to services and service providers with Equal access to consumers."
  • Video conferencing is a great way to keep in touch with office workers on one hand and grandchildren, elderly parents, or caregivers on the other. The technology is available today and rapidly improving as networks get faster. PC-based products like Skype, Google Chat, iChat, and FaceTime are free if you already have a broadband-connected PC with a webcam and speakers. High-def telepresence on TV comes with consumer products like Microsoft Xbox 360 with Kinect and Logitech Revue with TV Cam. There are also consumer versions of enterprise systems from companies like Cisco, Polycom, and Lifesize Communication. And then there are the portable smart phones & tables, including iPhone4 and iPad2.The choices are confusing because each has certain advantages, and the different products don’t always communicate with each other. So how do we solve this interoperability problem so one device can connect with family, healthcare providers, and employers who may each be on different systems? A logical solution is with bridging technology in the network Cloud. Using a remote service to do that gives the user flexibility to pick the solution that best fits their needs, not the one dictated by someone else. The resolution of a high-def TV may be ideal for someone who’s deaf and relies on signing and lip-reading. An iPhone4 or iPad2 is useful when your doctor says, “Show me where it hurts.” You can just point the camera at the exact spot. And if there’s a need for multi-user conferencing so a patient, family advocate, caregiver, and physician all be on the call at once, cloud services like VuRoom support that.
  • When telepresence is part of a Telework program, employers can hire the best candidates without uprooting them and their family, and unemployed or mobility challenged knowledge workers can seek new employment anywhere. Employers find that Telework supports people with disabilities that limit mobility and moms who want to work from home. They also notice increased worker productivity and reduced office expenses. And cities have noticed a reduction in rush hour traffic, pollution, and wear and tear on roads, among other benefits.
  • Healthcare costs are rising faster than inflation and will get worse as baby boomers retire and unless something drastic is done in the field of telemedicine. Telepresence, for example, gives someone with limited mobility or in a remote region access to big city medical services, but there are many other health benefits of cloud computing. Both Google Health and Microsoft’s Health Vault let Mom manage her entire family’s medical records online in a secure vault that includes information about insurance, important contacts, prescription drugs, shot records, baseline vital signs, and even a history of sensor readings. All of that is available anywhere and on any device when needed, such as in an out-of-town emergency. Advancements in new medical devices and services are evolving daily, but how are we to discover and evaluate them? That’s the role of a new online community, Modern Health Talk, which connects people with technologies for home healthcare. Like many other cloud-based services, it relies on social media and a community willing to share personal stories, experiences and advice.
  • Cloud computing can help reform the entire education system, from pre-kindergarten through college and life-long learning. It can give young students access to the best teachers and course material electronically, in ways that engage them and lets them learn at their own pace. Imagine taking trumpet lessons from Winton Marsalis himself or participating in a music ensemble where each musician is in a different city. For adults facing many career changes during their working life, the Internet cloud gives them new opportunities with the ability to learn new skills for a new job while still working at the old one. And for people with disabilities, cloud-based services make it easier to adapt course material to the needs of the student without forcing them into a special school.Cloud computing can help reform the education system, from pre-K through college and life-long learning. Young students can learn at their own pace while accessing great teachers and course material. Adults can develop skills for new job opportunities while still working at the old job. And course material materials can be adapted for special needs.
  • Sharing documents with team members through email is so… old school. It’s also less secure than collaborating online and working from the same master copy. That vision is real today with Google Apps, a collection of cloud-based applications. Social media and other apps that bring groups of likeminded people together online can give people new hope, inspiration and purpose so they can find the best way to contribute to society.
  • Technology products for niche markets almost always cost more than mass market products, because development serves fewer customers. So it makes more sense to design products for everyone universally and incorporate different user interfaces for different needs. Developers are starting to design products with flexibility to interact in different ways, including typing, pointing or gesturing, speaking, and even thinking. Even the popular iPhone, with its black touch screen, can be used by a blind person, thanks to the flexibility of also using speech commands and gestures.Some products can also anticipate user needs and function automatically, whether based on a set of predefined rules or through intelligent agents. A truly “smart” home, for example, would include artificial intelligence and an army of distributed sensors, cameras, and microphones that give the home a sense of what’s going on in the environment, the ability to learn and act on behalf of the occupants, and the ability to carry on a natural language conversation. But if you lived in a smart home, what would happen if you moved? All that learned “knowledge” of your preferences would be lost – unless the knowledge is stored remotely in the Cloud.
  • One view of cloud computing has many users sharing the resources of a single application server. Another view is to combine the resources of many PCs into a grid with the combined processing power of a supercomputer. Consumers can already share the capacity of their otherwise-idle PCs across high-speed networks to enable a World Community Grid. Parallel processing is then used to split complex tasks into small pieces that can be processed simultaneously on thousands of personal computers to address complex applications such as predicting the effect of global warming, fighting HIV & AIDS, and detecting extraterrestrial intelligence through analysis of radio telescope data.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Lifted by the Cloud<br />A vision of Cloud-based Accessibility<br />Based on “BIG Broadband and Gigabit-to-the-Home “<br />This shortened and narrated presentation by Wayne Caswell was submitted as part of a contest sponsored by the Federal Communications Commission, the Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities, and Raising the Floor. It’s based on the author’s 2006 presentation on BIG Broadband and Gigabit-to-the-Home.<br />
    • 2. Telepresence<br />For Work, Families & Healthcare<br />iChat with<br />Wayne<br />Video conferencing is a great way to keep in touch with office workers on one hand and grandchildren, elderly parents, or caregivers on the other. The technology is available today and rapidly improving as networks get faster. <br />
    • 3. Telework<br />Working from Home or on the Go<br />When telepresence is part of a Telework program, employers can hire the best candidates without uprooting them and their family, and unemployed or mobility limited knowledge workers can seek new employment anywhere. <br />
    • 4. Telemedicine<br />a Solution to Rising Healthcare Costs<br />Healthcare costs are rising faster than inflation and will get worse as baby boomers retire unless something drastic is done with telemedicine. Telepresence, for example, gives someone with limited mobility or in a remote region access to big city medical services. <br />
    • 5. Distance Learning<br />for Keeping Up with Technology<br />L EARN<br />to EARN<br />Cloud computing can help reform the education system, from pre-K through college and life-long learning. Kids can learn at their own pace, and adults can develop skills for new job opportunities while still working at the old job. Course material materials can be adapted for special needs.<br />
    • 6. Collaboration<br />working together to achieve common goals<br />Sharing documents with team members through email is so… old school. It’s also less secure than collaborating online and working from the same master copy. That vision is real today with Google Apps, a collection of cloud-based applications. <br />
    • 7. Universal Design<br />Smarter Products for everyone, <br />regardless of Age, Ability or Status<br />with Intelligence in the Cloud<br />Smarter Products<br />Smarter Homes<br />Products designed for niche markets almost always cost more than mass market products, because development serves fewer customers. So it makes more sense to design products for everyone universally and incorporate different user interfaces for different needs. <br />
    • 8. Parallel Processing<br />Idle PCs with Supercomputer Power<br />Consumers share their otherwise-idle PCs across high-speed networks to enable a World Community Grid. Parallel processing is then used to split complex tasks into small pieces that can be processed simultaneously on thousands of personal computers to address complex applications<br />

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