Tps October09

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This is a presentation about the Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources program.

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Tps October09

  1. 1. Primary Sources<br />Critical Thinking**Inquiry-based Learning**Content Understanding<br />Peggy O’Neill-Jones<br />Regional Director<br />oneilljp@mscd.edu<br />
  2. 2. <ul><li>Outreach from the Library of Congress
  3. 3. Professional Development
  4. 4. Access, use and produce primary source-based curriculum
  5. 5. Digital Collections from the Library of Congress
  6. 6. Library of Congress - http://www.loc.gov
  7. 7. Teaching with Primary Sources -http://tpscolorado.mscd.edu
  8. 8. Based out of Metropolitan State College of Denver
  9. 9. Western Region </li></ul>Teaching with Primary Sources<br />
  10. 10. Agenda: <br />Primary Sources – Why? <br />Western Region Project<br />Teaching with Primary Sources<br />Fostering Historical Thinking<br />Transferring the Learning <br />
  11. 11. Evidence <br /><ul><li>Photographs
  12. 12. Letters
  13. 13. Journals
  14. 14. Official documents
  15. 15. Licenses
  16. 16. Bibles
  17. 17. Maps
  18. 18. Announcements
  19. 19. Movies
  20. 20. Audio
  21. 21. Sheet Music</li></ul>Why Primary Sources? <br />
  22. 22. Thinking<br /><ul><li>Fact vs. Conjecture
  23. 23. Evidence vs. Assertion
  24. 24. Compare/contrast
  25. 25. Analysis, synthesis and evaluation of evidence
  26. 26. Infer
  27. 27. Draw Conclusions</li></ul>Evidence <br /><ul><li>Photographs
  28. 28. Letters
  29. 29. Journals
  30. 30. Official documents
  31. 31. Licenses
  32. 32. Bibles
  33. 33. Maps
  34. 34. Announcements
  35. 35. Movies
  36. 36. Audio
  37. 37. Sheet Music</li></ul>Why Primary Sources? <br />
  38. 38. Thinking<br /><ul><li>Distinguish between important and inconsequential
  39. 39. Significance of the past to the present
  40. 40. Significance of personal character for good and ill
  41. 41. Not all problems have solutions</li></ul>Evidence <br /><ul><li>Photographs
  42. 42. Letters
  43. 43. Journals
  44. 44. Official documents
  45. 45. Licenses
  46. 46. Bibles
  47. 47. Maps
  48. 48. Announcements
  49. 49. Movies
  50. 50. Audio
  51. 51. Sheet Music</li></ul>Why Primary Sources? <br />
  52. 52. Evidence <br /><ul><li>Photographs
  53. 53. Letters
  54. 54. Journals
  55. 55. Official documents
  56. 56. Licenses
  57. 57. Bibles
  58. 58. Maps
  59. 59. Announcements
  60. 60. Movies
  61. 61. Audio
  62. 62. Sheet Music</li></ul>Why Primary Sources? <br />
  63. 63. Evidence <br /><ul><li>Photographs
  64. 64. Letters
  65. 65. Journals
  66. 66. Official documents
  67. 67. Licenses
  68. 68. Bibles
  69. 69. Maps
  70. 70. Announcements
  71. 71. Movies
  72. 72. Audio
  73. 73. Sheet Music</li></ul>Why Primary Sources? <br />
  74. 74. Evidence <br /><ul><li>Photographs
  75. 75. Letters
  76. 76. Journals
  77. 77. Official documents
  78. 78. Licenses
  79. 79. Bibles
  80. 80. Maps
  81. 81. Announcements
  82. 82. Movies
  83. 83. Audio
  84. 84. Sheet Music</li></ul>Why Primary Sources? <br />
  85. 85. Evidence <br /><ul><li>Photographs
  86. 86. Letters
  87. 87. Journals
  88. 88. Official documents
  89. 89. Licenses
  90. 90. Bibles
  91. 91. Maps
  92. 92. Announcements
  93. 93. Movies
  94. 94. Audio
  95. 95. Sheet Music</li></ul>Why Primary Sources? <br />
  96. 96. Evidence <br /><ul><li>Photographs
  97. 97. Letters
  98. 98. Journals
  99. 99. Official documents
  100. 100. Licenses
  101. 101. Bibles
  102. 102. Maps
  103. 103. Announcements
  104. 104. Movies
  105. 105. Audio
  106. 106. Sheet Music</li></li></ul><li>
  107. 107. Teaching with Primary Sources <br />Foundations<br />Acquire a working knowledge of the American Memory website by examining and exploring the breadth and organization of the Library of Congress digital primary source collection. Gain an understanding of the value of primary sources in instruction and create an annotated resource set to use in your classroom and share with your colleagues. <br />
  108. 108. Teaching with Primary Sources <br />Inquiry and 21st Century Learning<br />Discover the strategies used to create, teach, and evaluate inquiry-based learning experiences that use primary sources to integrate 21st century learning skills and literacy strategies from the Library of Congress.<br />
  109. 109. Foundations: <br />Search all collections<br />Example<br />Search by criteria<br />Example<br />Search by keyword<br />Example<br />Finding unique items<br />Example<br />Annotated Resource Sets<br />Example<br />
  110. 110. Fostering Historical Thinking<br />
  111. 111. <ul><li>Identify central questions in a historical narrative and the purpose, perspective, or point of view from which it has been constructed (Historical Thinking Standard 2b)
  112. 112. Utilize and draw upon visual data to clarify, illustrate, or elaborate upon information presented in the historical narrative (Historical Thinking Standards 2f and 2g).
  113. 113. Compare and contrast differing sets of ideas and values by identifying likenesses and differences (Historical Thinking Standard 3b).
  114. 114. Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past by demonstrating their different motives, beliefs, interests, hopes, and fears (Historical Thinking Standard 3d).
  115. 115. Interrogate historical data by uncovering the social, political, and economic context in which it was created (Historical Thinking Standard 4c).
  116. 116. Evaluate alternative courses of action in terms of ethical considerations, the interests of those affected by the decision, and the long- and short-term consequences of each (Historical Thinking Standard 5d). </li></ul>Historical Thinking<br />
  117. 117. <ul><li>Formulate a position or course of action on an issue by identifying the nature of the problem, analyzing the underlying factors contributing to the problem, and choosing a plausible solution from a choice of carefully evaluated options (Historical Thinking Standard 5e).
  118. 118. http://nchs.ucla.edu/standards/k-4_thinking5.html</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Formulate a position or course of action on an issue by identifying the nature of the problem, analyzing the underlying factors contributing to the problem, and choosing a plausible solution from a choice of carefully evaluated options (Historical Thinking Standard 5e).
  119. 119. http://nchs.ucla.edu/standards/k-4_thinking5.html</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Formulate a position or course of action on an issue by identifying the nature of the problem, analyzing the underlying factors contributing to the problem, and choosing a plausible solution from a choice of carefully evaluated options (Historical Thinking Standard 5e).
  120. 120. http://nchs.ucla.edu/standards/k-4_thinking5.html</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Formulate a position or course of action on an issue by identifying the nature of the problem, analyzing the underlying factors contributing to the problem, and choosing a plausible solution from a choice of carefully evaluated options (Historical Thinking Standard 5e).
  121. 121. http://nchs.ucla.edu/standards/k-4_thinking5.html</li></li></ul><li>Analysis Sheet<br />
  122. 122.
  123. 123.
  124. 124.
  125. 125.
  126. 126.
  127. 127.
  128. 128.
  129. 129. The consent of the governed is a good thing in theory, but very rare in fact.<br /> England has governed her colonies whether they consented or not. By not waiting for their consent she has greatly advance the world’s civilization.<br /> The U.S. must govern its new territories with or without their consent until they can govern themselves. <br />
  130. 130. TITLE:  School begins<br />RIGHTS INFORMATION:  No known restrictions on publication.<br />SUMMARY:  Caricature showing Uncle Sam lecturing 4 children labelled Philippines, Hawaii, Porto Rico and Cuba in front of children holding books labelled with various U.S. states. In the background is an American Indian holding book upside down and a Chinese boy at door.<br />MEDIUM:  1 print : lithograph, color.<br />CREATED/PUBLISHED:  c1899.<br />NOTES:<br />Color lithograph by Louis Dalrymple, copyrighted by Keppler & Schwarzmann. <br />Illus. in: Puck, (1899 Jan. 25), p. 8-9. <br />This record contains unverified, old data from caption card, with subsequent revisions. <br />Caption card tracings: Dalrymple, Louis, 1866-1905. <br />DIGITAL ID:  (color film copy slide) cph 3b48925 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/cph.3b48925 <br />
  131. 131.
  132. 132. <ul><li>Identify central questions in a historical narrative and the purpose, perspective, or point of view from which it has been constructed (Historical Thinking Standard 2b)
  133. 133. Utilize and draw upon visual data to clarify, illustrate, or elaborate upon information presented in the historical narrative (Historical Thinking Standards 2f and 2g).
  134. 134. Compare and contrast differing sets of ideasand values by identifying likenesses and differences (Historical Thinking Standard 3b).
  135. 135. Consider multiple perspectives of various peoples in the past by demonstrating their different motives, beliefs, interests, hopes, and fears (Historical Thinking Standard 3d).
  136. 136. Interrogate historical data by uncovering the social, political, and economic context in which it was created (Historical Thinking Standard 4c).
  137. 137. Evaluate alternative courses of actionin terms of ethical considerations, the interests of those affected by the decision, and the long- and short-term consequences of each (Historical Thinking Standard 5d). </li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Formulate a position or course of action on an issue by identifying the nature of the problem, analyzing the underlying factors contributing to the problem, and choosing a plausible solution from a choice of carefully evaluated options (Historical Thinking Standard 5e).
  138. 138. http://nchs.ucla.edu/standards/k-4_thinking5.html</li></ul>Transfer the learning<br />How does learning from the past influence the present?<br />
  139. 139. TPS in my state? How?<br />
  140. 140. <ul><li>Alaska
  141. 141. Arizona
  142. 142. Hawaii
  143. 143. Idaho
  144. 144. Montana
  145. 145. Nevada
  146. 146. New Mexico
  147. 147. North Dakota
  148. 148. Oregon
  149. 149. South Dakota
  150. 150. Texas
  151. 151. Utah
  152. 152. Washington
  153. 153. Wyoming</li></li></ul><li>Contact:<br />Peggy O’Neill-Jones<br />Regional Director<br />Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources<br />303-556-4821<br />oneilljp@mscd.edu<br />Questions?<br />

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