Hank Venema, IISD - Water & Agriculture
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  • SLIDE 4   RACING / CAUTION FLAG ·      The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development has identified the potential for the bioeconomy to produce,   significant global economic, social and environmental benefits in an integrated framework”, as it can “ increase the supply and environmental sustainability of food, feed, and fibre production, improve water quality, provide renewable energy ....” BUT: “...bioeconomy potential will not be realized without attentive and active support from governments and the public at large. Innovative Policy Frameworks are needed to move forward to meet these global challenges and these need strategic thinking by governments and citizen support.” Analysts from the Netherlands who have probably the most experience with the Bioeconomy caution us further:  “Solving multiple problems interrelated in complex way requires a systematic approach…. steering sustainable development will require prospective scenario tools like back-casting.” -  The bottom line is that a narrow agenda focussed on just policy, or regulation, or technology, or business development just won’t suffice – we need an integrated approach,– a sustainable development approach inspired by different perspectives.   That’s why you’re here - You’ll notice that the tables are mixed up – we didn’t isolate all the business guys, the bureaucrats, the scientists, the environmentalists, the students at their own tables – we’ve deliberately mixed you up.   We need to talk to each other.  
  • SLIDE 4 RACING / CAUTION FLAG OECD: growing strategic interest in the concept of the “bioeconomy” in OECD and non-OECD countries, not least because it addresses the potential for significant global economic, social and environmental benefits in an integrated framework” “ Biotechnology (the bioeconomy) offers technological solutions for many of the health and resource challenges facing the world. It can increase the supply and environmental sustainability of food, feed, and fibre production, improve water quality, provide renewable energy ....” “ ...bioeconomy potential will not be realized without attentive and active support from governments and the public at large. Innovative Policy Frameworks are needed to move forward to meet these global challenges and these need strategic thinking by governments and citizen support.” EU “ Bioeconomy must address sustainability –since a non- sustainable bio-based economy would be even more disastrous than a fossil-based economy” Langeveld et al: “multiple problems interrelated in complex way requires a systematic approach…. steering sustainable development will require prospective scenario tools like back-casting.”
  • - primarily agricultural Mostly privately held
  • We looked at all the ecoregions in the southern agricultural portion of the province We examined how resources are used, how farming is done, what crops are grown, how water is managed in each of them We examined the potential for producing raw biomass – wheat straw, flax shives, corn stover We looked at the N and P that is not being used by crops
  • List innovation
  • A riparian buffer zone as outlined to the right implemented across southern Manitoba could: provide approximately 882 thousand tonnes of biomass feedstock. improve water quality by filtering 1368 tonnes of N 695 tonnes of P
  • Top three images: Cattail harvest Picture to the far left & near the top: Duckweed municipal wastewater treatment station at Devil’s Lake – 2 nd largest in the world - in use since 1990 - requires little or no electricity or chemicals - inhibits mosquito growth - meets secondary or tertiary treatment requirements - harvested duckweed can be used as a soil amendment, compost material, or high-protein animal feed - similar systems could be developed and applied to treat livestock manure Bottom images: Left – algae/water weed harvester Right – fish aquaculture
  • Our challenge is to turn these liabilities and impediments into strategic assets . And we believe that the bioeconomy is the vehicle by which we can achieve this. Nutrients in the form of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium the three elements that make up fertilizers are extremely valuable and strategic. This was recently exemplified by Australian Mining Giant BHP Biliton’s attempt to take over Potash Corporation in Saskatchewan, Canada. Potash Corporation owns more than 50% of the world’s potash reserves which are expected to last thousands of year. Rock Phosphate mined for phosphorus which causes eutrohpication and algal bloom problems has reserves that are expected to peak in 30 years under the worst case scenario and hundreds of years under the best case scenario. Yet we continue to mismanage this precious nutrient. The bioeconomy will use managed natural enviornments to lock up these nutrients into bioproducts. Excess water needs can sometimes be effectively dealt with by retaining it on the landscape. Using wetlands to store water can help with groundwater recharge, and filter water to improve its quality. Natural enviornments that provide us with important environmental services such as flood protection, water filtration, wildlife habitat will no longer be viewed as impediements to revenue generation by agriculture as they will be actively managed to provide revenues by suppying the bioeconomy with raw materials for bioproducts.
  • Last line of defence before the Lake Wetlands are a critical component of our watersheds Wetlands in urban and agricultural watersheds of Lake Winnipeg provide a host of important upstream co-benefits Intercept Phosphorous and nutrients Reduce flooding with slow release Clean the water Recharge groundwater aquifers Reduce droughts effects Moderate climate change Provide economic products Preserve biodiversity Reduce erosion Aesthetic, educational, spiritual Netley-Libau Marsh shows integrated systems thinking and showcases practices that inform new value chains based on natural systems management and enhancement. Research conducted in Netley-Libau Marsh by IISD and the University of Manitoba reveals harvesting cattail biomass can remove 20 to 60 kg of phosphorous from litter and sediment per hectare per year. Once harvested, nutrients locked in plant tissue are prevented from being released into the environment via natural decomposition. Additionally, cattail carbon sequestration research in California demonstrated that cattails can annually sequester up to 75 metric tonnes of carbon per hectare. A further benefit can be gained from using harvested cattail biomass for bioenergy feedstock to displace fossil fuels used for heating or electricity. Finally, the potential for harvesting phosphorous from the biofuel ash is being explored for use in fertilizers. The harvest of cattails for bioenergy production, carbon sequestration, eutrophication mitigation, and phosphorous recovery would help increase and diverse rural economic activity while also providing increased energy security and access to phosphorous. Integrated systems thinking through practices that provide multiple benefits and enable new value chains based on natural systems management and enhancement. Research conducted in Netley-Libau Marsh reveals nutrient capture potential through harvesting cattail biomass that can remove 20 to 60 kg of phosphorous from litter and sediment per hectare per year. Additionally, cattail carbon sequestration research in California demonstrated that cattails can annually sequester up to 75 metric tonnes of carbon per hectare. A further benefit can be gained from using harvested cattail biomass for bioenergy feedstock to displace fossil fuels used for heating or electricity. Finally, the potential for harvesting phosphorous from the biofuel ash is being explored for use in fertilizers. The harvest of cattails for bioenergy production, carbon sequestration, eutrophication mitigation, and phosphorous recovery would help increase and diverse rural economic activity while also providing increased energy security and access to phosphorous. Chinese story about value chain mainstreaming…

Hank Venema, IISD - Water & Agriculture Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Click to edit Master text styles
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    The Watershed of the Future The Lake Winnipeg Bioeconomy Project
  • 2. Agricultural Nutrients Cultural Eutrophication & Global Food Security changing the narrative to opportunity and innovation
  • 3.
  • 4. 35% 32% 14% 11% 8% Lake Winnipeg Stewardship Board 2006 67% 2/3 of the of the MB P load non-point watershed sources
  • 5. What you’ve seen on the news
  • 6. Some of what you’ve seen on the news
  • 7. You may have seen this too ADD BHP logo
  • 8. Lake Winnipeg Regional Diagnosis
    • Very difficult – perhaps intractable conventional environmental management problem involving interaction physical, cultural and historical forces.
    • More difficult than Lake Erie clean-up in the 1970s (~$15B ), which largely involved regulating several hundred point sources
    • But enormous opportunity if you can see the underlying systems dynamics – the noxious pollutant is actually a very strategic resource
  • 9.  
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  • 11. Click to edit Master text styles
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  • 13. Bioeconomy: Strategy Needed
    • “ ... attentive and active support from governments and the public at large.
    • … .need strategic thinking by governments and citizen support.”
  • 14.
    • “ ... multiple problems interrelated in complex way requires a systematic approach ....
    • … .will require prospective scenario tools like backasting. ”
    Bioeconomy: Strategy Needed
  • 15. “ How do we create and take advantage of opportunities for Manitoba’s economy while reducing nutrient loading within the Lake Winnipeg Basin?”
  • 16. Watershed of the Future
    • Systems approach
    • Enabling Policies
    • Strategic Investment
    • Communications and Outreach
    • Innovative Technology
  • 17. Land use in Southern MB
  • 18. Agricultural Land in Southern MB
  • 19. Watershed Processes
  • 20. Opportunities for change
  • 21. Farm Field
  • 22. Shoreline/Riparian Biomass Switchgrass (5m) Alfalfa (5m) Willow (15m)
  • 23. Water Biomass Harvest
  • 24. Strategic Use of Wetlands
  • 25.
    • 250 Km 2 Coastal Wetland on south shore of Lake Winnipeg
    • Complex of shallow lakes, channels and wetland areas
    • Red River passes through the marsh to the lake
    • Significant P and N loads enter Lake Winnipeg via the Red River
    • Netley-Libau Marsh is an important component of a Lake Winnipeg Basin management strategy
    • Not currently functioning as a healthy coastal wetland
    Netley-Libau Marsh
  • 26. Cattail biomass harvesting Spring harvest Summer harvest
  • 27. Cattail Biomass Pellets for fuel Bioenergy – Heat Innovative Technology – Netley-Libau Nutrient-Bioenergy Project Captured P N C … Exported P N C … P ASH Recovery
  • 28. Biorefinery Agriculture BMPs Agriculture Biomass Riparian Biomass Aquatic Biomass Restored Wetlands Thriving Rural Economies Nutrients diverted from watershed to biorefinery Water storage Biodiversity Recreation Water storage Food Provision Drought Mitigation Flood Protection Cultural Reduced Nutrients
  • 29. Phosphorous Application and Removal Tonnes
  • 30. Bioeconomy Revenue $B
  • 31. Feedback: Vision Statements
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34.  
  • 35.
    • Pilot Projects
      • Netley
    • R&D priorities - biorefinery
    • Investment
    • Partnerships
      • Producer
      • Provincial
      • Federal
      • Municipal
      • University
    Pillar 2 Innovation And Investment
    • Community
    • Public
    • Government
    • Conventional Media
    • Social Media
    Pillar 3 Communication
    • Planning
    • Regulation
    • Institutional
    • Research and Development
    • Innovation
    • Investment
    Pillar 4 Policy Development
    • Vision
    • Geographic and Economic Analysis
    • Planning Priorities
    • Timelines
    Pillar 1 Strategy
  • 36. Partnerships
  • 37.