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A WRITER’S TOOLBOX
   Trinkets From My Writing Workshop
           By Jenny Shotts
WEEKLY ROUTINES

MONDAY BIG WORDS--Use Letter Tiles To Create 1,2, 3+ Syllable
Words From The Weekly Letters.
TUESDAY ROOT...
BIG WORD ORGANIZED
                           ;2<&3!=================================!!!!!!!!.20&3!====================
  ...
CHALLENGE BY CHOICE



   Choose at least 5 words and use them in complete sentences. Ask a partner to help check
your edi...
THE FUTURE IS NEAR
SIFTABLES: Tools For Manipulating Digital Information
NEW MEDIA
And Comes In The Form Of The iApp, FirstWords
JOURNAL SEEDS
JOURNAL SEEDS
JOURNAL SEEDS
                                       BIO POEMS
This writing frame can be adapted to content areas as a way...
JOURNAL SEEDS
                                       BIO POEMS
This writing frame can be adapted to content areas as a way...
JOURNAL SEEDS
                                       BIO POEMS
This writing frame can be adapted to content areas as a way...
SENSORY WRITING
SENSORY WRITING
THE WRITING PROCESS

       This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop
sensory (descriptive) writing. Th...
THE WRITING PROCESS

       This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop
sensory (descriptive) writing. Th...
THE WRITING PROCESS

       This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop
sensory (descriptive) writing. Th...
THE WRITING PROCESS

       This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop
sensory (descriptive) writing. Th...
THE WRITING PROCESS

       This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop
sensory (descriptive) writing. Th...
Welcome to Computer Animation with Scratch




                                                                           ...
Name __________________________           Date____________________
            Scratch Computer Programming Elective Class...
Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl
Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning

     Name_________________...
REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl
Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning


                         ...
REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl
Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning


                         ...
REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl
Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning


                         ...
REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl
Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning


                         ...
REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl
Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning


                         ...
THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO
      GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO
      GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
ePearl Portfolio Guide
                                        Title:
          Describe your work with a title that grabs...
THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO
      GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO
      GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO
      GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO
      GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
My Goal Planning Draft
       Name:__________________                              Date: _______________
                 ...
My Artifact Draft
                    Enter this information in your Eportfolio Artifact Folder

       Name:_____________...
THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO
      GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
___________________'s Portfolio Check list                                                                            Date...
Inquiry is an approach to learning that involves a process of exploring
                                   INQUIRY        ...
...On The Next Blank Page Of My Journal
...On The Next Blank Page Of My Journal
...On The Next Blank Page Of My Journal
...On The Next Blank Page Of My Journal
...On The Next Blank Page Of My Journal
...On The Next Blank Page Of My Journal
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The Writing Toolbox09

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Writing Workshop and Authentic Assessment Tools

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  • Transcript of "The Writing Toolbox09"

    1. 1. A WRITER’S TOOLBOX Trinkets From My Writing Workshop By Jenny Shotts
    2. 2. WEEKLY ROUTINES MONDAY BIG WORDS--Use Letter Tiles To Create 1,2, 3+ Syllable Words From The Weekly Letters. TUESDAY ROOTS TO SHOOTS--Etymology, Embellishment Power Words, $$ Words, AKA Adjectives! WEDNESDAY WORD GAMES--Waker Uppers With Student Created Word Searches And Crosswords, Scrabble, Boggle, IPod & Online Word Games. THURSDAY THEMES--Comprehension Quizzles, CLOZE, Daily Oral Language, Rhymes, Research... FRIDAY HUDDLE--Student-Led Big Word Conference At The Whiteboard.
    3. 3. BIG WORD ORGANIZED ;2<&3!=================================!!!!!!!!.20&3!==================== (#>!+517!,1>24#?&1 STUDENTS: !"#$!%&&'$!()*!+,-.!/&00&1$!21&3 FRIDAYS: Use your Mondays Record new to you Waker Upper time to prefixes (beginnings) )!450#6&7!0"&$&!%517!8210$3! rhymes suffixes (endings) words at Huddle find word parts. Put in on your sheet. your take home folder. Save the )!450#6&7!0"&$&!098&$!5:!%517$3! BIG WORD FAMILIES: 1-syllable words 2-syllable words 3+ syllable words (if you know it) Use Scrabble Tiles or until the end. Cutout Letters to find Together we will 1, 2, & 3+ syllable fingerspell the one words each night. Add BIG WORD words with extra letters +517$!)!450#6&7!%"&4!)!277&7!50"&1!/&00&1$3! using all the in the bottom space. week’s letters. !"&!()*!+,-.!#$3! ___________________________________________________________________________
    4. 4. CHALLENGE BY CHOICE Choose at least 5 words and use them in complete sentences. Ask a partner to help check your editing. Write a story using this weeks words. Use as many words as you can in each paragraph. Ask a partner to help check your spelling and editing and publish the story in italics, cursive handwriting, or by word processing (open office, blog, wiki, ePearl, etc.) Design a crossword puzzle and write clues for at least 12 weekly words. Design a Word Search puzzle and write synonym clues for at least 12 weekly words. synonym: a word or phrase that means exactly or nearly the same as another word or phrase in the same language, for example shut is a synonym of close.
    5. 5. THE FUTURE IS NEAR SIFTABLES: Tools For Manipulating Digital Information
    6. 6. NEW MEDIA And Comes In The Form Of The iApp, FirstWords
    7. 7. JOURNAL SEEDS
    8. 8. JOURNAL SEEDS
    9. 9. JOURNAL SEEDS BIO POEMS This writing frame can be adapted to content areas as a way for students to showcase research on a famous artist, inventor, politician, author, etc. Don!t stop with people, write bio poems about planets, flowers, bugs, bacteria... For the writing journal, I use this frame to have students write about themselves at the beginning of the year. Last year, I had students interview each other and write bio poems about their interviewee. Adapt it to your age level and interest area. Bio Poem Line 1 First name Line 2 Four traits that describe character Line 3 Relative of (brother, sister, etc.) Line 4 Lover of (3 things or people) Line 5 Who feels (3 items) Line 6 Who needs (3 items) Line 7 Who fears (3 items) Line 8 Who gives (3 items) Line 9 Who would like to see (3 items) Line 10 Who lives (Resident of) Line 11 Last name This version of the Bio Poem is adapted from Tama, M.C. & McClain A. (2001). “Ch. 5: Writing Strategies” in Guiding Reading and Writing in the Content Areas: Practical Strategies. Kendall Hunt, pp. 175-234.
    10. 10. JOURNAL SEEDS BIO POEMS This writing frame can be adapted to content areas as a way for students to showcase research on a famous artist, inventor, politician, author, etc. Don!t stop with people, write bio poems about planets, flowers, bugs, bacteria... For the writing journal, I use this frame to have students write about themselves at the beginning of the year. Last year, I had students interview each other and write bio poems about their interviewee. Adapt it to your age level and interest area. Bio Poem Line 1 First name Line 2 Four traits that describe character Line 3 Relative of (brother, sister, etc.) Line 4 Lover of (3 things or people) Line 5 Who feels (3 items) Line 6 Who needs (3 items) Line 7 Who fears (3 items) Line 8 Who gives (3 items) Line 9 Who would like to see (3 items) Line 10 Who lives (Resident of) Line 11 Last name This version of the Bio Poem is adapted from Tama, M.C. & McClain A. (2001). “Ch. 5: Writing Strategies” in Guiding Reading and Writing in the Content Areas: Practical Strategies. Kendall Hunt, pp. 175-234.
    11. 11. JOURNAL SEEDS BIO POEMS This writing frame can be adapted to content areas as a way for students to showcase research on a famous artist, inventor, politician, author, etc. Don!t stop with people, write bio poems about planets, flowers, bugs, bacteria... For the writing journal, I use this frame to have students write about themselves at the beginning of the year. Last year, I had students interview each other and write bio poems about their interviewee. Adapt it to your age level and interest area. Bio Poem Line 1 First name Line 2 Four traits that describe character Line 3 Relative of (brother, sister, etc.) Line 4 Lover of (3 things or people) Line 5 Who feels (3 items) Line 6 Who needs (3 items) Line 7 Who fears (3 items) Line 8 Who gives (3 items) Line 9 Who would like to see (3 items) Line 10 Who lives (Resident of) Line 11 Last name This version of the Bio Poem is adapted from Tama, M.C. & McClain A. (2001). “Ch. 5: Writing Strategies” in Guiding Reading and Writing in the Content Areas: Practical Strategies. Kendall Hunt, pp. 175-234.
    12. 12. SENSORY WRITING
    13. 13. SENSORY WRITING
    14. 14. THE WRITING PROCESS This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop sensory (descriptive) writing. The writing organizer we use is printed on an 11x17 page and folded into a booklet. Using our five senses, I ask the learning community to brainstorm the details of our topic using the prompt, ”What do I/could I sense by seeing, hearing, touching, smelling and tasting?” I continue to develop and link this exploration to modeled texts we are reading together. “Oh my, Trenton Lee Stewart let’s me smell the scrumptious breakfasts in this part...” Moving to the pre-write and outline stage, we discuss and develop ‘hooks’ that pull the reader into the story for each section of the outline. The introduction is the topic’s heart. The body uses a magnifier to get at the details and the conclusion ties up any loose ends. Folding the page over, we connect these outlined hooks to the rough draft page. Unfolding the page as we finish this draft, we check the work for excellence asking, “What’s the main idea? Where is it?” and follow up on revision and editing needs, turning boring words into power words, circle questionably spelled words, defining each lead sentence, before publishing.
    15. 15. THE WRITING PROCESS This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop sensory (descriptive) writing. The writing organizer we use is printed on an 11x17 page and folded into a booklet. Using our five senses, I ask the learning community to brainstorm the details of our topic using the prompt, ”What do I/could I sense by seeing, hearing, touching, smelling and tasting?” I continue to develop and link this exploration to modeled texts we are reading together. “Oh my, Trenton Lee Stewart let’s me smell the scrumptious breakfasts in this part...” Moving to the pre-write and outline stage, we discuss and develop ‘hooks’ that pull the reader into the story for each section of the outline. The introduction is the topic’s heart. The body uses a magnifier to get at the details and the conclusion ties up any loose ends. Folding the page over, we connect these outlined hooks to the rough draft page. Unfolding the page as we finish this draft, we check the work for excellence asking, “What’s the main idea? Where is it?” and follow up on revision and editing needs, turning boring words into power words, circle questionably spelled words, defining each lead sentence, before publishing.
    16. 16. THE WRITING PROCESS This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop sensory (descriptive) writing. The writing organizer we use is printed on an 11x17 page and folded into a booklet. Using our five senses, I ask the learning community to brainstorm the details of our topic using the prompt, ”What do I/could I sense by seeing, hearing, touching, smelling and tasting?” I continue to develop and link this exploration to modeled texts we are reading together. “Oh my, Trenton Lee Stewart let’s me smell the scrumptious breakfasts in this part...” Moving to the pre-write and outline stage, we discuss and develop ‘hooks’ that pull the reader into the story for each section of the outline. The introduction is the topic’s heart. The body uses a magnifier to get at the details and the conclusion ties up any loose ends. Folding the page over, we connect these outlined hooks to the rough draft page. Unfolding the page as we finish this draft, we check the work for excellence asking, “What’s the main idea? Where is it?” and follow up on revision and editing needs, turning boring words into power words, circle questionably spelled words, defining each lead sentence, before publishing.
    17. 17. THE WRITING PROCESS This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop sensory (descriptive) writing. The writing organizer we use is printed on an 11x17 page and folded into a booklet. Using our five senses, I ask the learning community to brainstorm the details of our topic using the prompt, ”What do I/could I sense by seeing, hearing, touching, smelling and tasting?” I continue to develop and link this exploration to modeled texts we are reading together. “Oh my, Trenton Lee Stewart let’s me smell the scrumptious breakfasts in this part...” Moving to the pre-write and outline stage, we discuss and develop ‘hooks’ that pull the reader into the story for each section of the outline. The introduction is the topic’s heart. The body uses a magnifier to get at the details and the conclusion ties up any loose ends. Folding the page over, we connect these outlined hooks to the rough draft page. Unfolding the page as we finish this draft, we check the work for excellence asking, “What’s the main idea? Where is it?” and follow up on revision and editing needs, turning boring words into power words, circle questionably spelled words, defining each lead sentence, before publishing.
    18. 18. THE WRITING PROCESS This page demonstrates a classroom activity I use to develop sensory (descriptive) writing. The writing organizer we use is printed on an 11x17 page and folded into a booklet. Using our five senses, I ask the learning community to brainstorm the details of our topic using the prompt, ”What do I/could I sense by seeing, hearing, touching, smelling and tasting?” I continue to develop and link this exploration to modeled texts we are reading together. “Oh my, Trenton Lee Stewart let’s me smell the scrumptious breakfasts in this part...” Moving to the pre-write and outline stage, we discuss and develop ‘hooks’ that pull the reader into the story for each section of the outline. The introduction is the topic’s heart. The body uses a magnifier to get at the details and the conclusion ties up any loose ends. Folding the page over, we connect these outlined hooks to the rough draft page. Unfolding the page as we finish this draft, we check the work for excellence asking, “What’s the main idea? Where is it?” and follow up on revision and editing needs, turning boring words into power words, circle questionably spelled words, defining each lead sentence, before publishing.
    19. 19. Welcome to Computer Animation with Scratch imagine Advisor: Jenny Shotts ! email: jenny@trilliumcharterschool.org People have access to an incredible variety of media. Coding in Scratch is much easier than interactive games, stories, animations, in traditional programming languages: to Class Meeting Times: Mondays/Wednesday 1:50-3:15, simulations, and other types of dynamic, create a script, you simply snap together interactive media on their computers today. graphical blocks, much like LEGO bricks or PROGRAM Lower School students return to Advisory class at 3:00. But, for the most part, these programs are a puzzle pieces. SHARE one-way street: you can only browse and click what others have created; you can’t design Requirements: Students agree to attend teaching sessions and and create your own. actively listen to instructions and teacher requests. Independent Scratch changes that, broadening the range work time during class and/or as homework is expected. of what you can design and create on the computer, making it easier to combine Students will seek out teacher or assistant help when needed. graphics, photos, music, and sound into interactive creations. With Scratch, you can Off task and drifting behaviors require a check in with Jenny and create characters that dance, sing, and your advisor to set a plan for working in this class. interact with one another. Or create images Once you’ve created a Scratch project, you that whirl, spin, and animate in response to can share it on the Scratch website, the same Supplies: I highly recommend students have their own USB flash movements of the mouse. Or integrate images way you might share videos on YouTube or with sound effects and music clips to create an photos on Flickr. Or you can embed your drive. Available at office supply/Fred Meyers for less than $10, interactive birthday card for a friend, or an Scratch project in any other webpage – for interactive report for school. example, embedding an interactive Scratch these devices are handy for moving files to and from school. animation on your MySpace or Facebook The name Scratch comes from the homepage. scratching technique used by hip-hop disc What is Scratch? How does it work? What can it do? jockeys, who spin vinyl records back and forth You can get new ideas for Scratch projects by browsing through projects on the Scratch ! Scratch is a new ! The group develops new ! Students will practice with their hands to mix music clips together in creative ways. You can do something similar website. If you like one of the characters or programming language that technologies that, in the thinking creatively, with Scratch, mixing different types of media images or scripts in another project, simply communicating clearly, download the project and use parts of it in makes it easy to create your spirit of the blocks and clips (graphics, photos, music, sounds) in analyzing systematically, creative ways. your own Scratch project. own interactive stories, fingerpaint of kindergarten, collaborating effectively, Below are snapshots from projects that other games, and animations – expand the range of what signing interactively and At the core of Scratch is a graphical programming language that lets you control people created with Scratch. What do you and share your creations with people can design, create, learning continuously. the actions and interactions among different want to create with Scratch? others on the web. and learn. ! Scratch is developed by ! In this course students the Lifelong Kindergarten will learn how to create characters that dance, sing, research group at the MIT and interact with sound effects Media Lab (http:// and music. llk.media.mit.edu). Visit the Scratch Website at http:// scratch.mit.edu/ to download Scratch for Windows or Mac, share your projects, and get new ideas. Create your own login (with parent permission) or Lifelong Kindergarten Group, MIT Media Lab use the class login: username: trillium password: scratch MORE NEW WAYS TO WRITE: Project Based Learning With SCRATCH
    20. 20. Name __________________________ Date____________________ Scratch Computer Programming Elective Class Project Title: ______________________________________________________ _________I have shared my project on the Scratch website. _________I have added the link to my ePearl Portfolio (345 only.) Description (Tell what is happening in your project:) __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Scripts I used successfully in this project (for example, “If touching color” and “rotate 45 degrees”): __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Reflection: I am most proud/excited about this project because… __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
    21. 21. Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
    22. 22. Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
    23. 23. Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
    24. 24. Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
    25. 25. Students Reflect & Share Work To The Scratch Website
    26. 26. REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning Name_________________________________ Date______________________ Write a message for your home page in ePearl that helps the viewer learn who you are. Students can play around with customizing the look of the portfolio by clicking on the customize tab. We are also naming our "portfolio" and "workspace folders" in the following order: 1) independence 2) community 3) health & safety 4) numeracy 5) social science 6) science & tech 7) art 8) literacy The ninth folder can be labeled as "integrated" for holding projects that have many facets, or “experimental” for trying something out and seeing how it works. Enter your to do!s in this order: (they will appear in reverse order, which is how you want it.) 1. Make a new entry. Choose from these goals or ask your advisor to Once a work folder is created it can be clicked on and a 2. Write reflection. approve another goal... 3. Make revisions. new project can be started. This is a guided process that 4. Read my feedback. speller friend writer community member starts with planning and ends with reflection. The reader mediator program walks you through it. During this process, you General Goals (type in): mathematician helper 1. I want to become a better.... speaker typist can add links, upload photos, record audio, and import 2. I want to become a better... 3. I want to become a better... listener technologist scans. Once all sections have been completed it can be actor/storyteller athlete scientist musician added to the portfolio folders. artist
    27. 27. REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning Students can play around with customizing the look of the portfolio by clicking on the customize tab. We are also naming our "portfolio" and "workspace folders" in the following order: 1) independence 2) community 3) health & safety 4) numeracy 5) social science 6) science & tech 7) art 8) literacy The ninth folder can be labeled as "integrated" for holding projects that have many facets, or “experimental” for trying something out and seeing how it works. Once a work folder is created it can be clicked on and a new project can be started. This is a guided process that starts with planning and ends with reflection. The program walks you through it. During this process, you can add links, upload photos, record audio, and import scans. Once all sections have been completed it can be added to the portfolio folders.
    28. 28. REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning Students can play around with customizing the look of the portfolio by clicking on the customize tab. We are also naming our "portfolio" and "workspace folders" in the following order: 1) independence 2) community 3) health & safety 4) numeracy 5) social science 6) science & tech 7) art 8) literacy The ninth folder can be labeled as "integrated" for holding projects that have many facets, or “experimental” for trying something out and seeing how it works. Once a work folder is created it can be clicked on and a new project can be started. This is a guided process that starts with planning and ends with reflection. The program walks you through it. During this process, you can add links, upload photos, record audio, and import scans. Once all sections have been completed it can be added to the portfolio folders.
    29. 29. REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning Students can play around with customizing the look of the portfolio by clicking on the customize tab. We are also naming our "portfolio" and "workspace folders" in the following order: 1) independence 2) community 3) health & safety 4) numeracy 5) social science 6) science & tech 7) art 8) literacy The ninth folder can be labeled as "integrated" for holding projects that have many facets, or “experimental” for trying something out and seeing how it works. Once a work folder is created it can be clicked on and a new project can be started. This is a guided process that starts with planning and ends with reflection. The program walks you through it. During this process, you can add links, upload photos, record audio, and import scans. Once all sections have been completed it can be added to the portfolio folders.
    30. 30. REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning Students can play around with customizing the look of the portfolio by clicking on the customize tab. We are also naming our "portfolio" and "workspace folders" in the following order: 1) independence 2) community 3) health & safety 4) numeracy 5) social science 6) science & tech 7) art 8) literacy The ninth folder can be labeled as "integrated" for holding projects that have many facets, or “experimental” for trying something out and seeing how it works. Once a work folder is created it can be clicked on and a new project can be started. This is a guided process that starts with planning and ends with reflection. The program walks you through it. During this process, you can add links, upload photos, record audio, and import scans. Once all sections have been completed it can be added to the portfolio folders.
    31. 31. REFLECTIVE WRITING SPACES: EPearl Electronic Por tfolio Encouraging Active Reflective Learning Students can play around with customizing the look of the portfolio by clicking on the customize tab. We are also naming our "portfolio" and "workspace folders" in the following order: 1) independence 2) community 3) health & safety 4) numeracy 5) social science 6) science & tech 7) art 8) literacy The ninth folder can be labeled as "integrated" for holding projects that have many facets, or “experimental” for trying something out and seeing how it works. Once a work folder is created it can be clicked on and a new project can be started. This is a guided process that starts with planning and ends with reflection. The program walks you through it. During this process, you can add links, upload photos, record audio, and import scans. Once all sections have been completed it can be added to the portfolio folders.
    32. 32. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    33. 33. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    34. 34. ePearl Portfolio Guide Title: Describe your work with a title that grabs the reader!s attention Description: Explain what your overall project or work sample is demonstrating Task Goals: The steps you need to complete to get this goal done Criteria: How do you measure excellence at this goal Work Samples: ! artifact of your written work (pdf/scan file) ! writing typed directly in ePearl. ! photo of your artwork, display items, or other 3D work ! recording of your work ! link to url of your project Reflection: What did you enjoy about this piece? Why did you select it for presentation? What did you learn from the process? How will you make a new goal based on what you have now completed? THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    35. 35. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    36. 36. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    37. 37. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    38. 38. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    39. 39. My Goal Planning Draft Name:__________________ Date: _______________ Enter this information in your Eportfolio Artifact Folder General Goal: _______________________________________ Artifact Title: _______________________________________ Description: (What you want to do why you chose to do this, and when and where it will be done.) _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Criteria: (Specifically what your work needs to have/to show/to do to be excellent.) 1. ______________________________________________________________ 2. ______________________________________________________________ 3. ______________________________________________________________ 4. _____________________________________________________________ Task Goals: (order of steps that I need to do) 1. ______________________________________________________________ 2. ______________________________________________________________ 3. ______________________________________________________________ 4. _____________________________________________________________ Strategies: (how to get it done on time and with care) 1. ______________________________________________________________ 2. ______________________________________________________________ 3. ______________________________________________________________ *Reflection to be written once the artifact is completed. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    40. 40. My Artifact Draft Enter this information in your Eportfolio Artifact Folder Name:__________________ Date: _______________ Artifact Title: _______________________________________ Description: (Explain your work: Who, what, when, where, how and why?) _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Criteria: (List how you know your work is excellent.) 1. ______________________________________________________________ 2. ______________________________________________________________ 3. ______________________________________________________________ 4. _____________________________________________________________ Reflection:Which critieria was challenging and why? _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ What would you do to improve your work and why? _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    41. 41. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    42. 42. ___________________'s Portfolio Check list Date_________ Reason I have included it** shows something I am passionate about Shows something I want to improve on 2 pieces that show improvement shows work in progress Portfolio Section Artifact Name Shows my best work Independence Community Health & Safety Numeracy (Math) Social Sciences Science & Technology Art Literacy(Reading & Writing) e-portfolio is found at www.trilliumepearl.tk **for each selection make a detailed explanation in e-pearl. THE HEART OF THE PORTFOLIO GOAL SETTING & ARTIFACTS
    43. 43. Inquiry is an approach to learning that involves a process of exploring INQUIRY the natural or material world, that leads to asking questions and making discoveries in the search for new understandings. Inquiry, as it relates to science education, should mirror as closely as possible the from Latin in- "into" + quærere "ask, seek." enterprise of doing real science. Inquiry is an approach to by one's own curiosity,awonder, interest or The inquiry process is driven learning that involves process of exploring “For students, this method of learning ends the listen-to-learn paradigm the naturalunderstand an observation or to asking questions and passion to or material world, that leads solve a problem. of the classroom and gives them a real and authentic goal challenges to making discoveries in the search for new understandings. Inquiry, as it relates to science education, should mirror as closely as possible the overcome. For the teacher, inquiry-based education ends their paradigm The process begins by the learner noticing something that intrigues, enterprise of doing real science. surprises, or stimulates a question. What is observed often does not of talking to teach and recasts them in the role of a colleague and mentor make sense in relationship to the learner's previous experience or engaged in the same quest as the other younger learners around." The inquiry process is driven by one's own curiosity, wonder, interest or current understanding. _(http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/Cyberia/DVE/FusionDVE/html/_inquiry_based_education.html) passion to understand an observation or solve a problem. Action is then taken through continued observing, raising questions, The process begins by the learner noticing something that intrigues, making predictions, testing hypotheses and creating theories and surprises, or stimulates a question. What is observed often does not conceptual models. The learner must find their own idiosyncratic make sense in relationship to theis hardly ever a linear progression, pathway through this process; it learner's previous experience or “Inquiry is an approach to learning that involves a process of exploring current understanding. but rather more of a back and forth or cyclical series of events. the natural or material world, that leads to asking questions and making discoveries in the search for new understandings." Action processtaken throughobservations and questions emerge, giving As the is then unfolds more continued observing, raising questions, _(http://www.exploratorium.edu/IFI/resources/inquirydesc.html) making predictions, interaction and relationship with theories and occasion for deeper testing hypotheses and creating the phenomena -- conceptual models. The learner must find their own idiosyncratic and greater potential for further development of understanding. pathway through this process; it is hardly ever a linear progression, but rather more of a back and forth or cyclical series of events. Along the way, the inquirer is collecting and recording data, making representations of results and explanations, drawing upon other As the process unfolds more observations and questions emerge, giving “Inquiry education is where structure meets fluidity, where we can create resources such as books, videos and colleagues. occasion for deeper interaction and relationship with the phenomena -- opportunities for students to be engaged in active learning based on their and greater potential for further development of understanding. Making meaning from the experience requires intermittent reflection, own questions.” (From a small group discussion on "Inquiry in Action" at _The Inquiry conversations and comparison of findings with others, interpretation of Page Workshop on Feb 21, 2001. ) Along the way, the inquirer is collecting and recording data, making data and observations, and applying new conceptions to other contexts representations of results and explanations, drawing upon other as one attempts to construct new mental frameworks of the world. resources such as books, videos and colleagues. Teaching science using the inquiry process requires a fundamental Making meaning from the experience requires intermittent reflection, reexamination of the relationship between the teacher and the learner conversations and comparison a facilitator with others, interpretation of whereby the teacher becomes of findings or guide for the learner's data process of discovery and creating understanding of the world. own and observations, and applying new conceptions to other contexts as one attempts to construct new mental frameworks of the world. Source: http://www.exploratorium.edu/IFI/resources/inquirydesc.html#inquiry Teaching science using the inquiry process requires a fundamental reexamination of the relationship between the teacher and the learner whereby the teacher becomes a facilitator or guide for the learner's own process of discovery and creating understanding of the world. Source: http://www.exploratorium.edu/IFI/resources/inquirydesc.html#inquiry The Writing Cycle Continues...
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