Helping Homeschoolers in the Library
Part 1

Adrienne Furness
adrienne.furness@gmail.com
www.watat.com
Who am I?
Today’s Agenda
• Homeschooling myths and facts
• A brief history of homeschooling
• Get to know homeschoolers
(philosophie...
Part 2 Agenda
• Policies and services
• Programming
• Collections
What kind of experience have
you had with homeschoolers?
Why Libraries Don’t Work with
Homeschoolers
• Don’t know much about homeschoolers
and homeschooling
• Past attempts didn’t...
Homeschooling Myths
Myth #1:
Homeschoolers believe the
same things, operate in the
same ways, and get along
with each other.
Myth #2:
Homeschoolers are primarily
conservative Protestants.
Myth #3:
Homeschoolers are a bunch of
hippies.
Why People Homeschool

From Homeschooling in the United States: 2003
by Daniel Princiotta and Stacey Bielick
http://nces.e...
John Holt and the Unschooling
Movement
• How Children Fail (1964)
• How Children Learn
(1967)
• Growing Without
Schooling ...
Conservative Protestants
Homeschooling
• Raymond and Dorothy
Moore in the late 1970s
• James Dobson and the
Focus on the F...
Not Just for Christians Anymore
• Conservative Protestants are a large
percentage of the homeschooling
population, but eve...
Not Just for Christians Anymore
• Other religious groups
with significant
homeschooling
populations include
Pagans, Jews, ...
Other Philosophies and Trends
• Children who have
special needs
• Classical homeschoolers
(The Well-Trained Mind)
• Charlo...
Other Philosophies and Trends
•
•
•
•

Objectivist homeschoolers
Military homeschoolers
Artist homeschoolers
Eclectic home...
homeschooldiner.com
Homeschooling Laws
• Education laws are governed by states
• Homeschooling is legal in all 50 states,
but regulations vary...
Homeschooling in Florida
• Never quote law, always refer
• Florida’s laws not cumbersome: parents
need to report that they...
Curriculum Options
• No curriculum
• Florida curriculum
(http://www.fldoe.org/bii/curriculu
m/sss/)
• Packaged curriculum
...
Curriculum Options
• Unit studies
• Create-your-own curriculum
• Enrichment or community college
classes
• We’ll discuss t...
The Homeschooling Year
• Florida doesn’t require a particular
schedule or number of hours of
“seat time”
• Follow the scho...
The Homeschooling Year
• Create a calendar based on family
needs
– religious considerations
– medical needs
– travel or sp...
Daily Homeschooling
Schedules
• Schoolwork in the morning/outings in
the afternoon
• Chores in the morning/schoolwork in t...
Finding Support Groups
• FPEA (Florida Parent Educators Association):
www.fpea.com
• LIFE of Florida: lifeofflorida.blogsp...
Adrienne Furness
adrienne.furness@gmail.com
watat.com

www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=2353
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Helping Homeschoolers in the Library, Part 1 (NEFLIN)

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  • Before you start trying to work with homeschoolers, I think it’s very important to try to understand them and where they’re coming from.
  • Ask questions!
  • Helping Homeschoolers in the Library, Part 1 (NEFLIN)

    1. 1. Helping Homeschoolers in the Library Part 1 Adrienne Furness adrienne.furness@gmail.com www.watat.com
    2. 2. Who am I?
    3. 3. Today’s Agenda • Homeschooling myths and facts • A brief history of homeschooling • Get to know homeschoolers (philosophies, trends, schedules) • Homeschooling laws in FL • Support groups and other ways to connect with homeschoolers
    4. 4. Part 2 Agenda • Policies and services • Programming • Collections
    5. 5. What kind of experience have you had with homeschoolers?
    6. 6. Why Libraries Don’t Work with Homeschoolers • Don’t know much about homeschoolers and homeschooling • Past attempts didn’t work out • Concerns about how working with homeschoolers might impact the library • Limited staff, funding, and other resources
    7. 7. Homeschooling Myths
    8. 8. Myth #1: Homeschoolers believe the same things, operate in the same ways, and get along with each other.
    9. 9. Myth #2: Homeschoolers are primarily conservative Protestants.
    10. 10. Myth #3: Homeschoolers are a bunch of hippies.
    11. 11. Why People Homeschool From Homeschooling in the United States: 2003 by Daniel Princiotta and Stacey Bielick http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2006/homeschool/
    12. 12. John Holt and the Unschooling Movement • How Children Fail (1964) • How Children Learn (1967) • Growing Without Schooling (1977) • Child-led learning • Experiential • Real work
    13. 13. Conservative Protestants Homeschooling • Raymond and Dorothy Moore in the late 1970s • James Dobson and the Focus on the Family radio show in the early 1980s • Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA)
    14. 14. Not Just for Christians Anymore • Conservative Protestants are a large percentage of the homeschooling population, but even they don’t necessarily share the same beliefs. • Catholic homeschoolers have been a fast-growing segment of the homeschooling community.
    15. 15. Not Just for Christians Anymore • Other religious groups with significant homeschooling populations include Pagans, Jews, and Muslims. • Just because a family is religious does not mean religion is a major reason they homeschool.
    16. 16. Other Philosophies and Trends • Children who have special needs • Classical homeschoolers (The Well-Trained Mind) • Charlotte Mason homeschoolers
    17. 17. Other Philosophies and Trends • • • • Objectivist homeschoolers Military homeschoolers Artist homeschoolers Eclectic homeschoolers
    18. 18. homeschooldiner.com
    19. 19. Homeschooling Laws • Education laws are governed by states • Homeschooling is legal in all 50 states, but regulations vary widely
    20. 20. Homeschooling in Florida • Never quote law, always refer • Florida’s laws not cumbersome: parents need to report that they’re homeschooling and have an annual evaluation • 42,000 homeschooling families • Excellent web site from Florida Dept. of Ed.: http://www.floridaschoolchoice.org/infor mation/home_education/
    21. 21. Curriculum Options • No curriculum • Florida curriculum (http://www.fldoe.org/bii/curriculu m/sss/) • Packaged curriculum • Online/correspondence courses
    22. 22. Curriculum Options • Unit studies • Create-your-own curriculum • Enrichment or community college classes • We’ll discuss this more in the second session when we talk about collections
    23. 23. The Homeschooling Year • Florida doesn’t require a particular schedule or number of hours of “seat time” • Follow the school calendar • Homeschool year-round
    24. 24. The Homeschooling Year • Create a calendar based on family needs – religious considerations – medical needs – travel or special projects – business • Some follow no calendar at all
    25. 25. Daily Homeschooling Schedules • Schoolwork in the morning/outings in the afternoon • Chores in the morning/schoolwork in the late morning and early afternoon • Schoolwork in the evenings or at night • Some do no organized “seat work”
    26. 26. Finding Support Groups • FPEA (Florida Parent Educators Association): www.fpea.com • LIFE of Florida: lifeofflorida.blogspot.com • Try Google (town or county + homeschool)
    27. 27. Adrienne Furness adrienne.furness@gmail.com watat.com www.alastore.ala.org/detail.aspx?ID=2353

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