Dettol Hygiene Preventing Health Problems

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Washing your hands to protect from Germs is very important in our day to day life. Dettol (India) is the best company which have quality of products like hand soaps ,liquid soap ,Skincare Products which protect your family from diseases and make your life healthy and happy.

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  • I truly believe antibacterial soaps play an important role in hygiene.. Great information.. Thanks :)
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Dettol Hygiene Preventing Health Problems

  1. 1. Setting the Hand Hygiene Standards • Practical recommendations from the Hygiene Council to help improve hand hygiene standards • Findings of the 2009 International consumer survey Supported by Dettol – Leaders in Hygiene
  2. 2. Introduction why is it so important to improve hygiene? The global increase in infection due to bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, or parasites is evident in all nations. Western developed nations have seen an increase in hospital acquired infection and antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, while some developing nations have seen increases in resistant tuberculosis1 and in malaria.2 Regardless of geographical location, many infectious diseases can be prevented or contained through good hygiene practice and education. Whether this is to ensure that stored water is covered to reduce the spread of dengue or malaria, that purifying tablets are used for drinking water, that the mouth is covered when coughing, or simple effective hand washing when running water is available. Prevention is better than cure. Childhood infections Pneumonia, diarrhoea, and HIV/AIDS each account for approximately 30% of child deaths in developing nations, particularly Africa.3 Hygiene StandardS Hygiene Council 3
  3. 3. Introduction the Hygiene Council The Hygiene Council is a group of leading global experts in the fields of microbiology, virology, infectious disease, immunology, and public health. The Council reviews current infectious disease threats to society and formulates realistic recommendations on simple hygiene measures to help the public improve levels of hygiene in the home and community and in turn help to prevent the spread of all kinds of infections. This year, the Hygiene Council, responding to consumer confusion about how best to be hygienically safe during the spread of infectious diseases, has come up with a set of practical recommendations to help all of us practice good hand hygiene. By translating science into practice, everyone can have a clear idea of best practice. From left to right: Back Row: Professor Exner (GERMANY), Joe Rubino (DIRECTOR, R&D LABS), Dr Letlape (SOUTH AFRICA), Philippe Gaertner (FRANCE) Middle Row: Dr Lee (MALAYSIA), Professor Signorelli (ITALY), Professor Schoub (SOUTH AFRICA) Front Row: Professor Tierno (USA), Professor Oxford (UK), Dr Narendra Saini (INDIA), Dr Low (CANADA) Hygiene StandardS Hygiene Council 5
  4. 4. Did you know? The hands are one of the most important causes of cross contamination and cross infection in the home. HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence
  5. 5. Handwashing your first line of defence “After hand washing with soap, hands should be thoroughly dried on a clean dry towel” HANDWASHING WHY is hand washing so important? The hands are one of the most important causes of cross contamination, and the spread of flu. WHEN should you wash your hands? Before... Eating or before feeding children• Applying contact lenses• Giving any medication or first aid• After... Coughing, sneezing or blowing and scratching the nose• Touching frequently touched surfaces and objects• Using the toilet or changing a child’s nappy• Handling pets and domestic animals• Before and after... Handling raw food• Tending to someone who is sick• And whenever... Hands appear dirty• HOW should hands be washed? Where soap and clean water are available, follow the six-step• hand washing process - See next page » Where soap and clean water are not available, alcohol-based• hand rubs can be used to kill germs on the hands, but not if the hands are visibly dirty as these products don’t clean HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence Hygiene StandardS Hygiene Council 7
  6. 6. “Only 42% people in India believe that hand washing is the most effective way to prevent the spread of flu” HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence
  7. 7. The 2009 Global Survey found that: • Only 42% people in India believe that hand washing is the most effective way to prevent the spread of flu • 29% of people in India might not wash their hands properly after coughing or sneezing • 70% of Indians don’t wash their hands for the recommended duration (at least 20 seconds) Wet hands and apply soap. Rub palms together until soap is bubbly1. Rub each palm over the back of the other hand2. Rub between your fingers on each hand3. Rub backs of fingers (interlocked)4. Rub around each of your thumbs5. Rub both palms with finger tips then rinse and dry your hands6. The six-step process to washing your hands HANDWASHING HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence Hygiene StandardS
  8. 8. HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence 2009 International Consumer Survey Overview An International Consumer Survey has been carried out by the Hygiene Council in order to identify and assess worldwide and country-specific public behaviours, attitudes and opinions towards hygiene. The survey provides an insight into current beliefs and affords the Council the ability to identify trends and shifts in consumer attitudes over time. Survey Method The survey was conducted on behalf of the Hygiene Council by Taylor Nelson Sofres (TNS) Market Research Company between February and April 2009. A survey was carried out in 8 countries; Australia, Germany, India, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, UK and USA. Respondents in all countries were asked questions to allow for worldwide analysis and cross-country comparisons. Each country was then asked a series of locally relevant questions. Results The global survey questions with key findings are: surveyHygiene StandardS Hygiene Council 11
  9. 9. survey Q. Which of the following measures do you think is the most effective way to help protect against catching a cold or flu? *calculated from weighted base figure Only 42% of Indians• feel that washing hands regularly is an effective way to help protect against catching a cold or flu. Only 26% of Indians• feel that covering your nose and mouth while sneezing is an effective way to help protect against catching a cold or flu. Country Wash hands Cover your Avoid public Disinfect Avoid being None of Don’t know/ regularly nose and places / surfaces you near animals / these Refused mouth when transport frequently birds sneezing touch Australia 46% 16% 12% 7% 0% 15% 5% Germany 60% 8% 17% 5% 1% 8% 2% Great Britain 46% 27% 11% 10% 0% 5% 1% India 42% 26% 10% 13% 5% 5% 0% Malaysia 21% 30% 17% 14% 14% 2% 2% Saudi Arabia 20% 42% 15% 14% 8% 1% 0% South Africa 53% 16% 3% 13% 5% 7% 4% USA 79% 9% 3% 4% 1% 2% 1% Total Avg* 45% 22% 10% 10% 5% 6% 2% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% Wash hands regularly Cover your nose and mouth when sneezing Avoid public places / transport Disinfect surfaces you frequently touch Avoid being near animals / birds None of these Don't know / Refused Australia Germany Great Britain India Malaysia Saudi Arabia South Africa USA HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence Hygiene StandardS 12 Hygiene Council
  10. 10. survey Q. On which of the following occasions might you not wash your hands properly? 70% of people in India might not wash their hands after touching commonly• touched surfaces. 29% of people in India might not wash their hands after coughing or sneezing.• Country After touching After Before Before After using None of Don’t know / commonly Sneezing / cooking / eating the toilet these Refused touched coughing serving food surfaces like a remote / phone etc. India 70% 29% 7% 5% 5% 15% 1% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% After touching commonly touched surfaces like a remote / phone etc. After sneezing / coughing Before cooking / serving food Before eating After using the toilet None of these Don't know / Refused India HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence Hygiene StandardS Hygiene Council 13
  11. 11. Q. On average, how long do you take to wash your hands? 70% of people in India do not wash their hands for the recommended• duration (at least 20 seconds). Country Upt to 5 5 – 10 10 – 20 20 – 30 30 Don’t wash Don’t know / seconds seconds seconds seconds seconds + hands at all Refused India 8% 33% 29% 10% 19% 0% 1% survey 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% Up to 5 seconds 5-10 seconds 10-20 seconds 20-30 seconds 30 seconds + Don't wash hands at all Don't know / Refused India HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence Hygiene StandardS 14 Hygiene Council
  12. 12. survey Q. Of the following options, which do you feel is the most effective way to prevent the spread of germs in the home? *calculated from weighted base figure Only 44% of people in India believe ‘washing hands regularly’ is the most• effective way to prevent the spread of germs in the home, with regular surface disinfection (31%) the next priority Country Wash hands Surface Prevent Avoid kissing or Disinfect None of Don’t know/ regularly disinfection on animals from close physical the these Refused a regular entering the contact with laundry basis house family & friends Australia 53% 36% 2% 2% 1% 4% 2% Germany 55% 27% 6% 5% 2% 5% 1% UK 51% 40% 3% 2% 2% 1% 1% India 44% 31% 10% 3% 8% 4% 0% Malaysia 31% 31% 21% 4% 11% 1% 1% Saudi Arabia 16% 43% 30% 3% 7% 0% 0% South Africa 56% 24% 10% 4% 1% 2% 3% USA 65% 25% 3% 2% 1% 2% 2% Total Avg* 47% 31% 11% 3% 4% 2% 1% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Wash hands regularly Surface disinfection on a regular basis Prevent animals from entering the house Avoid kissing or close physical contact with family and friends Disinfect the laundry None of these Don't know / Refused Australia Germany Great Britain India Malaysia Saudi Arabia South Africa USA HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence Hygiene StandardS Hygiene Council 15
  13. 13. survey Q. When you clean your hands, which of the following do you usually use…? *calculated from weighted base figure 9% of people in India wash their hands with running water only.• Country Runnign water Running Running Hand Hand None of Don’t know/ and antibact- water and water sanitizer wipes these Refused erial liquid regular only only only hand soap soap Australia 39% 52% 4% 3% 0% 1% 1% Germany 8% 90% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% Great Britain 52% 43% 2% 1% 0% 1% 0% India 45% 43% 9% 2% 2% 0% 0% Malaysia 33% 53% 12% 1% 1% 0% 0% Saudi Arabia 38% 54% 2% 5% 1% 0% 0% South Africa 22% 60% 15% 2% 0% 1% 0% USA 48% 45% 2% 3% 0% 1% 1% Total Avg* 34% 55% 7% 2% 1% 0% 0% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Running water and antibacterial liquid hand soap Running water and regular hand soap Running water only Hand sanitizer only Hand wipes only None of these Don't know / Refused Australia Germany Great Britain India Malaysia Saudi Arabia South Africa USA HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence Hygiene StandardS 16 Hygiene Council
  14. 14. survey Q. On which of the following occasions’ might your children not wash their hands? 59% of people in India admit that their children might not wash their hands• during in between meal snacking. Country Before Before Before In between Don’t know/ breakfast Lunch Dinner meal snacking Refused India 14% 16% 11% 59% 33% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Before breakfast Before lunch Before dinner In between meal snacking Don't know / Refused India HygieneStandardsHandwashing–Yourfirstlineofdefence Hygiene StandardS Hygiene Council 17
  15. 15. Hygiene Council Members CHAIR: Professor John Oxford, Professor of Virology at St• Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, UK Professor Martin Exner, Managing Director, Institute of• Hygiene and Public Health, University of Bonn, Germany Dr Christopher Lee, Consultant Physician Infectious• Diseases, Sungai Buloh Hospital, Malaysia Dr Kgosi Letlape, Immediate past President of the World• Medical Association (WMA), South Africa Dr Donald Low, Microbiologist-in-Chief at Toronto• Medical Laboratories/Mount Sinai Hospital, Canada Professor Tariq Ahmed Madani, Professor of Internal• Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Advisor to the Minister of Health, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Dr Sandip K Ray, Secretary General, Indian Public Health• Association, India Joe Rubino, Director Shared Services, R&D Laboratories,• Reckitt Benckiser Dr Narendra Saini, Head of Department Microbiology &• Immunology and Chairman Hospital Infection Control committee, Pushpanjali Crosslay Hospital, Vaishali, India Professor Barry Schoub, Executive Director, National• Institute for Communicable Diseases, Johannesburg, South Africa Professor Carlo Signorelli, Vice-President of the Italian• Society of Hygiene, Preventative Medicine and Public Health (Sltl), Italy Dr Rhonda Stuart, Infectious Disease Physician, Monash• Medical Center, Victoria, Australia Professor Philip M Tierno, Director Clinical Microbiology• and Immunology, New York University Langone Medical Center, Clinical Professor of Microbiology and Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, USA Websites International Scientific Forum on Home Hygiene (IFH): • www.ifh-homehygiene.org World Health Organisation (WHO):• www.who.int European Food Safety Authority:• www.efsa.europa.eu Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC):• www.cdc.gov/ Hygiene Council:• www.hygienecouncil.com Reckitt Benckiser Information Lizol: www.lizol.co.in• Dettol: www.dettol.co.in• Reckitt Benckiser: www.reckittbenckiser.com• References Von Gottberg A, Klugman KP, Cohen C et al. Emergence 1. of levofloxacin-non-susceptible streptococcus pneumonia and treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in children in South Africa: a cohort observational surveillance study. Lancet 2008;371:1108-13. Kiszewski A, Johns B, Schapira A et al. Estimated global 2. resources needed to attain international malaria control goals. Bulletin of the World Health Organisation 2007;85(8):623-30. South African Every Death Counts Writing Group. Every death 3. counts: use of mortality audit data for decision making to save the lives of mothers, babies, and children in South Africa. Lancet 2008; 371:1294-1304. HAND HYGIENE IN THE HOME AND COMMUNITY: IFH 4. briefing document for health professionals, July 2007.
  16. 16. Supported by Dettol – Leaders in Hygiene

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