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Chapter09      Implementing And  Using  Group  Policy
 

Chapter09 Implementing And Using Group Policy

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    Chapter09      Implementing And  Using  Group  Policy Chapter09 Implementing And Using Group Policy Presentation Transcript

    • Managing a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment Chapter 9: Implementing and Using Group Policy
    • Objectives
      • Create and manage Group Policy objects to control user desktop settings, security, scripts, and folder redirection
      • Manage and troubleshoot Group Policy inheritance
      • Deploy and manage software using Group Policy
    • Introduction to Group Policy
      • Group policy centralizes management of user and computer configuration settings throughout a network
      • A group policy object is an Active Directory object used to configure policy settings for user and computer objects
      • There are two default Group Policy Objects:
        • Default Domain Policy (linked to domain container)
        • Default Domain Controllers Policy (linked to domain controller OU)
    • Introduction to Group Policy (continued)
      • You can modify default GPOs
      • You can create new GPOs and link them to particular sites, domains, and OUs
        • Policy settings will be propagated to all users and computers in container including child OUs
      • Group policy can only be applied to computers running Windows Server 2003, Windows 2000, and Windows XP
    • Creating a Group Policy Object
      • Two ways to create a GPO:
        • Group Policy standalone Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in
        • Group Policy extension in Active Directory Users and Computers
    • Activity 9-1: Creating a Group Policy Object Using the MMC
      • Objective: To create a GPO using the Group Policy Object Editor MMC snap-in
        • Locate the MMC Group Policy Object Editor snap-in
        • Create a new GPO
    • Activity 9-1 (continued)
    • Activity 9-2: Creating OUs and Moving User Accounts
      • Objective: To create new Organizational Units and move existing user accounts into them.
        • Must be familiar with using OUs for controlling the application of Group Policy settings
      • Create new OUs using Active Directory Users and Computers
      • Move users into the new OUs
    • Activity 9-3: Creating a Group Policy Object and Browsing Settings Using Active Directory Users and Computers
      • Objective: Create a GPO using Active Directory Users and Computers as an alternative to MMC snap-in
        • From Active Directory Users and Computers, use the Group Policy tab of the Properties of an existing OU to add and create GPOs
        • Browse configuration settings of a Group Policy Object
    • Editing a GPO
    • Editing a GPO (continued)
      • Table 9-1 shows configuration categories for both computer and user configurations
      • Two tabs in Properties of each setting:
        • Setting allows you to enable or disable the setting
        • Explain provides information about the setting
      • GPO content is stored in 2 locations:
        • Group Policy container (GPC)
        • Group Policy template (GPT)
      • A GPO is identified by a 128-bit globally unique identifier (GUID)
    • Activity 9-4: Deleting Group Policy Objects
      • Objective: To delete a GPO using Active Directory Users and Computers
      • A previously created GPO is deleted from an OU
    • Application of Group Policy
      • Two main categories to a Group Policy
        • Computer configuration (settings apply to computers in the container)
        • User configuration (settings apply to users in the container)
      • Upon computer startup (or user logon)
        • Computer queries domain controller for GPOs. Domain controller finds applicable GPOs.
        • Domain controller presents list of GPOs. The client gets Group Policy templates, applies the settings and runs the scripts.
        • Same basic process happens for user logons
    • Controlling User Desktop Settings
      • Administrative templates
        • Used to limit user manipulation of user desktop and computer configurations
        • Aim is to reduce administrative costs
        • Seven main categories of configuration settings can be applied to either computer or user section of a GPO
    • Controlling User Desktop Settings (continued)
    • Activity 9-5: Configuring Group Policy Object User Desktop Settings
      • Objective: To configure and test the application of Group Policy settings
      • Use Active Directory Users and Computers to access the desired configuration settings
      • Configure settings using the Group Policy Object Editor
      • Verify that the configured settings have the expected results
    • Managing Security Settings with Group Policy
      • Password Policy, Account Policy, and Kerberos Policy settings are only applicable to domain objects
      • Other nodes in Security Settings category can be applied at both domain and OU levels
        • Local Policies
          • Audit Policy
          • User Rights Assignment
          • Security Options
    • Managing Security Settings with Group Policy (continued)
        • Event Log
        • Restricted Groups
        • System Services
        • Registry
        • File System
        • Wireless Network Policies
        • Public Key Policies
        • Software Restriction Policies
        • IP Security Policies on Active Directory
    • Activity 9-6: Configuring Group Policy Object Security Settings
      • Objective: Use Group Policy settings to configure a logon banner for domain users
      • Use Active Directory Users and Computers to access the Default Domain Policy GPO
      • Create a logon banner
      • Verify that the banner appears
    • Activity 9-7: Configuring File System Security Using Group Policy Settings
      • Objective: Use Group Policy settings to configure security permissions
      • Create a folder
      • Use Active Directory Users and Computers to configure the permissions on the folders
      • Update Group Policy settings on the server
      • Verify that the permissions are explicitly defined
    • Assigning Scripts
      • Windows Server 2003 can run scripts during:
        • User logon or logoff
          • User section of GPO
        • Computer startup and shutdown
          • Computer section of GPO
      • Default is for scripts to run synchronously from top to bottom
      • Can specify script time-outs, asynchronous execution, and hiding of scripts
    • Activity 9-8: Assigning Logon Scripts to Users Using Group Policy
      • Objective: Use GPOs to assign logon scripts to domain users
      • Create a script file
      • Add the script to the logon policies of a particular group using Active Directory Users and Computers
      • Verify that the script runs for members of the group and not for other users
    • Redirecting Folders
      • Allows you to redirect the contents of a user’s profile to a network location
      • Profile contents that can be redirected are application data, desktop, My Documents, Start menu
      • Redirection is useful because it:
        • Aids in backup
        • Reduces logon time
        • Allows creation of a standard desktop for multiple users
    • Redirecting Folders (continued)
    • Managing Group Policy Inheritance
      • Specific order for GPO application:
        • Local computer  Site  Domain  Parent OU  Child OU
      • By default, all GPO settings are inherited
      • At each level, there can be multiple GPOs
        • Policies are applied in the order that they appear on the Group Policy tab for each container, bottom GPO first
      • Applying a large number of GPOs can affect startup and logon performance
    • Managing Group Policy Inheritance (continued)
      • Conflicts are resolved according to a set formula
      • Policies are updated automatically at intervals and can be updated manually
      • Policies can be linked to a site, domain, or specific OU containers
      • Multiple Group Policies can be assigned to a single container
      • A single Group Policy can be linked to multiple containers
    • Activity 9-9: Linking a Group Policy Object to Multiple Containers
      • Objective: Link a single GPO to multiple containers
      • Using Active Directory Users and Computers, create and configure a new GPO in one OU
      • Add the GPO to another OU
    • Configuring Block Policy Inheritance, No Override, and Filtering
      • These options allow default behavior to be changed for specific containers
        • Can change default inheritance policy
        • Can change default conflict resolution
        • Can change permissions for a specific member within a group to deny GPO application for that member
    • Blocking Group Policy Inheritance
      • To change default inheritance, use the Block Policy inheritance check box on the Group Policy tab for a child container
        • Child will not inherit parent’s policies
        • Useful if one OU needs to be managed separately
    • Configuring No Override
      • If a policy is configured with No Override
        • It will be enforced despite conflicts in lower-level policies
        • It will be enforced on lower-level containers with Block Policy inheritance set
    • Filtering Using Permissions
      • Prevents policy settings from applying to a particular user, group, or computer within a container
      • To filter a GPO from a particular container member, deny Read and Apply Group Policy permissions for the member account only
    • Activity 9-10: Configuring Group Policy Object Inheritance Settings
      • Objective: Explore and configure Group Policy inheritance settings
      • Configure the Default Domain Policy GPO using Active Directory Users and Computers
      • Override the Default Domain Policy configuration at the OU level and verify the override
      • Configure No Override option at the domain level
      • Verify No Override option
    • Activity 9-11: Filtering Group Policy Objects Using Security Permissions
      • Objective: Use security permissions to filter and control the application of Group Policy settings
      • Using Active Directory Users and Computers, add a user account to a group but deny the group’s GPO permissions
      • Verify that the added user account is not configured with the group’s GPO
    • Troubleshooting Group Policy Settings
      • Potential trouble areas:
        • Order of Group Policy processing
        • Improper use of No Override or Block Policy inheritance settings
        • Read and Apply Group Policy permissions
      • Utilities that show effective Group Policy settings
        • GPRESULT
          • Command-line utility
        • Resultant Set of Policy (RSoP)
          • Graphical utility
    • Activity 9-12: Determining Group Policy Settings Using the Resultant Set of Policy Tool
      • Objective: Use RSoP to determine effective Group Policy settings
      • Use Active Directory Users and Computers to configure the Default Domain Policy
      • Open a new MMC with the Resultant Set of Policy snap-in
      • Use RSoP to Generate RSoP Data
    • Activity 9-12 (continued)
    • Deploying Software Using Group Policy
      • Applications that can be deployed using Group Policy include:
        • Business applications (e.g., Microsoft Office)
        • Anti-virus software
        • Software updates (e.g., service packs)
      • Four phases of software rollout
        • Software preparation
        • Deployment
        • Software maintenance
        • Software removal
    • Software Preparation
      • Microsoft Windows installer package (MSI)
        • MSI file contains all of the information needed to install an application in a variety of configurations
        • Software vendors include preconfigured MSI packages
        • For older applications, can create MSI packages using 3 rd party utilities (e.g., VERITAS)
      • To install, place MSI file in a shared folder and configure Group Policy to access for installation
    • Software Preparation (continued)
      • If application doesn’t have an MSI package can use ZAP file
        • Text file used by Group Policy to deploy an application
        • Can only be published and not assigned
        • Is not resilient
        • Requires user intervention and proper permissions
    • Deployment
      • Two ways to deploy an application
        • Assigning applications
        • Publishing applications
    • Assigning Applications
      • When a policy is created to assign an application
        • Any user who the policy applies to has a shortcut on the Start menu
          • Application is installed when user clicks shortcut the first time or opens it with an associated document
        • If policy configured in computer section, application is installed next time the computer is started
        • Applications are resilient (if files are corrupted, will reinstall itself)
    • Publishing Applications
      • When a policy is created to publish an application
        • Not advertised in Start menu
        • Installed using the Add/Remove Programs applet or by opening an associated document
        • Only published to users and not computers
    • Configuring the Deployment
      • Create or edit a GPO and specify deployment options
      • Assign or publish application to computers or users to install at the appropriate time
    • Activity 9-13: Publishing an Application to Users Using Group Policy
      • Objective: Publish an application using Group Policy settings
      • Create a shared folder and copy files into it
      • Create a GPO to publish the msi software files in the folder
      • Login as a member of the group using the GPO and install the software
    • Activity 9-14: Assigning an Application to Users Using Group Policy
      • Objective: To assign an application using Group Policy settings
      • Create and configure a new GPO to assign software installation to the users in an OU
      • Log on as a user in the OU
      • Verify that the software installs and executes as expected
    • Software Maintenance
      • Software must be maintained with patches and updates
      • Deployment of patches and updates can be:
        • Mandatory upgrade
        • Optional upgrade
        • Redeployment of an application
    • Software Removal
      • Application must have been originally installed using a Windows installer package
      • Removal can be:
        • Forced removal
        • Optional removal
      • Forced removal uninstalls application and prevents it from being reinstalled
      • Optional removal does not uninstall application but does prevent it from being reinstalled once removed
    • Summary
      • A Group Policy Object is an object in Active Directory used to configure and apply settings for user and computer objects
      • Two default GPOs created when Active Directory is installed:
        • Default Domain Policy
        • Default Domain Controllers Policy
      • Two mechanisms for creating GPOs
        • Microsoft Management Console Group Policy snap-in
        • Group Policy extension in Active Directory Users and Computers
    • Summary
      • GPOs can be used:
        • to control user desktop settings and security settings
        • to apply scripts on user logon and logoff and computer startup and shutdown
        • for folder redirection
      • GPOs are applied in a specific order
      • GPOs are inherited by default
        • Can be changed by blocking Group Policy inheritance, configuring No Override, or filtering using user permissions
        • Use GPRESULT or Resultant Set of Policy tool to view effective Group Policy settings
    • Summary
      • GPOs are useful in deploying and maintaining software applications
      • GPOs are used for four main phases of software rollout: preparation, deployment, maintenance, removal
      • For deployment, Group Policy uses an MSI file containing information needed to install in a variety of configurations
      • Deployed applications can be either assigned or published