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Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
Biography of a giant - Amazon.com
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Biography of a giant - Amazon.com

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As part of a college assignment, had made this presentation. The theme was Marketing Strategies, learning what was done right by a successful company.

As part of a college assignment, had made this presentation. The theme was Marketing Strategies, learning what was done right by a successful company.

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  • Amazon.com company time line http://www.xtimeline.com/timeline/History-of-amazon-com
  • - Dec 1999, Time magazine named Bezos "Person of the Year," calling him the "king of cybercommerce." - Jan 2000, company fired 150 workers, mostly employees at its Seattle HQ - Amazon reported a loss of $323 million for the holiday fourth quarter 99-2000 - summer of 2000, Amazon's stock price had dropped by more than two-thirds - "One much publicized report by Lehman Brothers warned investors that the company might run out of cash and advised them to avoid its stock" - Early 2001 -- when Amazon reported a whopping fiscal loss of $1.4 billion
  • Amazon transformed itself from a specialty retailer into an online shopping portal, taking a cue from auctioneer eBay, which set itself up as a mediator between buyer and seller. It started selling products from companies such as Toys "R" Us and Target on its Web site. It added merchandise from smaller retailers in its zShops. And it competed directly with eBay through its Amazon Auctions. Most recently, Amazon launched product categories with merchandise from other retailers. Its apparel store, for instance, debuted in the fall of 2002 stocked with underwear, sweaters and jeans from companies such as Nordstrom and Gap. Although Amazon lists the merchandise on its Web site, it does not actually take control of the inventory; the individual vendors are responsible for fulfilling their orders. Amazon, however, receives a cut from the sales. Amazon's sales from third-party vendors are still a small percentage of its total revenue, but the margins are higher.
  • http://www.kokogiak.com/gedankengang/2004/07/amazoncom-logo-timeline.html
  • Amazon Kindle is a portable e-book reader. More precisely, it is a software, hardware and network platform developed by Amazon.com that utilizes wireless connectivity to enable users to shop for, download, browse, and read e-books, newspapers, magazines, blogs, and other digital media in some countries. About the different version of kindles http://gdgt.com/amazon/kindle/ Amazon.com got outside the web browser in 2007 and offered its customers a way to purchase books through its very own making: an e-book reader specially designed by the online retailer. Since available in 2007, a new version has been announced and Amazon continues to expand the services and products available to current and future Kindle owners.
  • * Over the past three months, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon has sold, it has sold 143 Kindle books. In its Kindle update, Amazon did not offer any comparison between the sales of paperbacks and e-books. * Over the last 30 days, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon.com has sold, it has sold 180 Kindle books. * Author James Patterson had sold 1.14 million e-books to date. Of those, 867,881 were Kindle books. * Five authors—Charlaine Harris, Stieg Larsson, Stephenie Meyer, James Patterson, and Nora Roberts—have each sold more than 500,000 Kindle books. * The U.S. Kindle store now has more than 630,000 books available, including new releases and 106 of 110 New York Times best sellers. * About 510,000 books available for Kindle are priced at $9.99 or less, including 75 New York Times best sellers. * Over 1.8 million free, out-of-copyright, pre-1923 books are also available to read on Kindle.
  • The Amazon Web Services (AWS) are a collection of remote computing services (also called web services) that together make up a cloud computing platform, offered over the Internet by Amazon.com. The most central and well-known of these services are Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3. Amazon Web Services provide online services for other web sites or client-side applications. Most of these services are not exposed directly to end users, but instead offer functionality that other developers can use. In June 2007, Amazon claimed that more than 330,000 developers had signed up to use
  • From jeffs blog http://aws.typepad.com/aws/2008/05/lots-of-bits.html
  • Transcript

    1. Biography of a Giant A presentation in Marketing Strategy
    2. A – Z on a .com <ul><li>Founded in 1994 by Jeff Bezos
    3. Launched in 1995
    4. Online bookstore and more...
    5. First major companies to do e-commerce </li></ul>
    6. Did you know that... The original name of Amazon.com was Cadabra.com
    7. Startup phase <ul><li>At 30, already VP of
    8. Quit his job, to start an Internet company
    9. Aggressive growth prospects ( 2300% )
    10. Tom Alburg invested $100,000 (seed capital) </li></ul>
    11. And sell what? “Bezos drew up a list of 20 products that could be sold on the Internet” <ul><li>Narrowed to 5 </li><ul><li>Books
    12. Hardware
    13. Software
    14. Videos
    15. Compact Disc </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Finally selected Books with 2000 titles in stock </li></ul>
    16. Seattle HQ “An Online company with its core competency being Offline” Seattle because... <ul><li>Large high-tech work force
    17. Proximity to a large book distribution center </li></ul>
    18. Company Expansion 1997, IPO announced <ul><li>Fund used to: </li><ul><ul><li>Broaden the company
    19. Improve the product
    20. Distribution capabilities </li></ul></ul><li>70% expansion in the Seattle HQ
    21. New office in east coast </li></ul>“reduce delivery with east coast office publisher and customers”
    22. Did you know that... Douglas Hofstadter 's book holds the privilege of being the first sold book on Amazon.com
    23. Reseller Model The Associate Program was also launched in 1997 <ul><li>Webmasters could refer a book sale to Amazon
    24. Made 3-8% on book sale
    25. Amazon partnered with two US biggies
    26. Later partnerships including </li></ul>
    27. Product Expansion The Amazon Advantage program <ul><li>Sell your consignment @ 55% discount
    28. Yearly membership fee of $29.95 </li></ul>Amazon stocks, manages, delivers and at the end pays you for every book
    29. Did you know that... A glitch in Amazon.com's programming allowed writers to criticize their own works favorably on the site.
    30. Product Expansion(cont.) Amazon kids <ul><li>Catering to site demographics
    31. 100K titles for teens and kids </li></ul>Amazon music <ul><li>1998 also launched the music section with 125K titles
    32. Searchable by artist, song title, label
    33. Hear before buying (225K sound clips) </li></ul>
    34. Online bubble burst <ul><li>Jan 2000, company fired 150 workers
    35. Reported a loss of $323 million for fourth quarter '99-2000
    36. Summer of 2000, stock price dropped substantially
    37. Early 2001, Amazon reported a whopping fiscal loss of $1.4 billion </li></ul>“ Lehman Brothers warned investors that the company might run out of cash and advised them to avoid its stock”
    38. The Change <ul><li>Cut expenses and restructure business model
    39. Laying off 1,300 workers(about 15% work force)
    40. Closing two warehouses
    41. Shutting down a Seattle customer-service center </li></ul>“Bezos followed with a memo calling for the company to get the crap out and stop selling products that weren't profitable.”
    42. The Change (cont.) <ul><li>From specialty retailer into an online shopping portal
    43. Adopted eBay's auction model
    44. Selling merchandise from other retailers (apparel, etc)
    45. Does not actually take control of the inventory </li></ul>&quot;The more things they can sell to (customers) and not do the dirty work, the better the business grows,&quot; said Kate Delhagen, a retail analyst with Forrester Research.
    46. Website over the years
    47. Branding - reBranding
    48. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 1998 <ul><li>The biggest repository for information about movies and television
    49. Strengthening their plans to launch movies on Amazon portal </li></ul>
    50. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 1999 <ul><li>Every Amazon member gets a free first aid kit
    51. Acquired 46% of Drugstore.com for $44 Million
    52. Entry to the Pharmacy market segment </li></ul>
    53. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 1999 <ul><li>Access to many technology patents
    54. A ton of demographics information
    55. Opportunity for behavioral targetting </li></ul>
    56. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 2000 <ul><li>A 30 Million investment in WineShopper
    57. Access to 550 wineries in 45 States
    58. Reaching 85% of USA population </li></ul>
    59. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 2004 <ul><li>A web retailer in China, now Amazon china
    60. Purchased for $75 Million
    61. Caters mainly to books, music, video </li></ul>
    62. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 2006 <ul><li>Makers of open-source s/w used in wikipedia.org
    63. Invested in Wikia inc. series B financing
    64. Focus on User content driven development </li></ul>
    65. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 2008 <ul><li>Bought the online fabric store (amount undisclosed)
    66. Custom measures and cut fabric
    67. More to the Amazon catelog </li></ul>
    68. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 2009 <ul><li>An Online cooking encyclopedia
    69. Untapped channel to up-sell F&B
    70. Strengthen Amazon in another segment </li></ul>
    71. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 2009 <ul><li>Image recognition technology
    72. Most popular applications for iPhones and Android phones
    73. Gives image searching to Amazon mobile users </li></ul>
    74. Acquisitions “All our acquisition are specifically to gain technological edge or market-share” Year: 2009 <ul><li>Acquisition worth $1.2 Billion
    75. Biggest shoe retailer online
    76. Core competency Logistics & Supply Chain </li></ul>
    77.  
    78. Whats the strategy now? <ul><li>Plateauing growth!! </li></ul>
    79. Line Extension The Kindle <ul><ul><li>Paper like display quality
    80. Books, Newspapers, Magazine
    81. Adjustable font
    82. Huge battery life </li></ul></ul>
    83. Selling more e-books <ul><li>In 2010, for every 100 hardcover books Amazon sold 143 Kindle books
    84. The U.S. Kindle store now has more than 630,000 books available
    85. About 510,000 books available for Kindle are priced at $9.99 or less
    86. Over 1.8 million free , out-of-copyright, pre-1923 books are also available to read on Kindle </li></ul>
    87. Shift of focus <ul><li>AWS (Amazon Web Services)
    88. Mechanical Turks (Human Intelligence) </li></ul>
    89. Diversification <ul><li>From e-retailing to web services </li><ul><li>E-retailing is Retailing
    90. Gap in the Current model </li></ul></ul>
    91. AWS offering <ul><li>Compute power, storage, and other services
    92. Platform or programming model flexibility
    93. Ton of benefits </li><ul><li>Pay as you go model
    94. Scalable
    95. Comprehensive eco-system
    96. Reliable – the Dig effect </li></ul></ul>
    97. AWS usage growth <ul><li>Exponential growth </li></ul>
    98. Who else use AWS <ul><li>Every major educational institute </li></ul>
    99. Diversification (cont.) “Amazon, from web services to human intelligence” <ul><li>Issues doing it recruiting in-house </li><ul><li>Time consuming
    100. Expensive
    101. Difficult to scale </li></ul></ul>
    102. Mechanical Turks <ul><li>Amazon take 10% project fee
    103. Pay only for what you use
    104. A global, on-demand, 24 x 7 workforce </li></ul>
    105.  

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